Law School Discussion

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Author Topic: Does anyone else think law school is alot easier than you thought it would be?  (Read 7047 times)

celarkobri

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Oh well, Jacy, this has been discussed before at great length, I'm not going to repeat it again.

I've been around on these boards for a while, and actually have never once heard this suggestion.

[...]


http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,28345.msg416169.html#msg416169

The thread on the impossibility of objective grading in law school and the way grades are distributed can be found here

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/topic,915.0.html

Is that first thread not simply the same argument you're having here with no one proffering any evidence in support of this "impossibility?"

jacy85

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I read those threads.


In each one, ONE person said that professors read your admissions file and use it in grading your exam.  No one commented on the statement here on the student board, and no one agreed with the comment on the pre-law board.

Last I checked, just because one person says something on an internet discussion board doesn't make it true.  It's a well known fact that at the vast majority of schools grading is done blindly.  Especially with using laptops in finals now, the possiblity of recognizing handwriting is practically non-existant.  Also, in a first year class, the exam is it.  No papers, or any other academic work, that's graded.  There's nothing for the professor to compare your exam with to determine who wrote it.

And that's fine if you choose to be a paranoid conspiracy theorist and believe this crap.  Granted, I don't think you should believe everything you read or are told.  But the theory of blind grading and admissions stats is just a little too far fetched for me (and apparently most others).

be10dwn

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I read those threads.


In each one, ONE person said that professors read your admissions file and use it in grading your exam.  No one commented on the statement here on the student board, and no one agreed with the comment on the pre-law board.

Last I checked, just because one person says something on an internet discussion board doesn't make it true.  It's a well known fact that at the vast majority of schools grading is done blindly.  Especially with using laptops in finals now, the possiblity of recognizing handwriting is practically non-existant.  Also, in a first year class, the exam is it.  No papers, or any other academic work, that's graded.  There's nothing for the professor to compare your exam with to determine who wrote it.

And that's fine if you choose to be a paranoid conspiracy theorist and believe this crap.  Granted, I don't think you should believe everything you read or are told.  But the theory of blind grading and admissions stats is just a little too far fetched for me (and apparently most others).

I agree. It is about the stupidist thing I have heard on here, and that's saying something.

antwan

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Grading is done anonomously (at least at my school). Even if it was't, to think that a professor would research you lsat, undergrad school, ant UGPA as he or she graded exams is the absolute dumbest, ridiculous thing I have ever heard. Think about the time that would entail, and for what? How did you morons get into law school?

eray01

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I agree. It sounds absurd. I suppose it's possible, but it's definitely not probable.

dft

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Well...

It wouldn't be impossible for a professor to somehow get access to a list of students with their LSATs next to it. This would explain the correlation between the LSAT and first-year law school grades. This is a pretty far fetched, paranoid, conspiracy theory though.

Profs are probably annoyed enough to have to grade 95 bluebooks (sections are 95 in my school, except crim (45) and lps (15-20)). They aren't going to want to put any more time into than they have to.

Grading is done anonomously (at least at my school). Even if it was't, to think that a professor would research you lsat, undergrad school, ant UGPA as he or she graded exams is the absolute dumbest, ridiculous thing I have ever heard. Think about the time that would entail, and for what? How did you morons get into law school?

manila

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(sections are 95 in my school, except crim (45) and lps (15-20)).

You should consider using [], dear mp!

[sections are 95 in my school, except crim (45) and lps (15-20)].

;)

jacy85

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There really isn't that strong of a correlation to just the lsat OR 1L grades.  Law schools invariably use the combination of gpa and lsat for 1L grades.

And I don't think that it's ridiculous that someone who did very well in undergrad AND had a very good lsat score is also likely to do well their first year of law school.

And the fact that the correlation isn't perfect tells me the system is working.  Not every person does as well as "expected" and many people do better than their scores would indicate.  The numbers and correlation allow for this.

There's absolutely no need for professors to have lsat scores or gpas, and I think if they asked admissions for them, they'd get laughed out of the office.

dft

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i know. i considered it. next time...

Quote
(sections are 95 in my school, except crim (45) and lps (15-20)).

You should consider using [], dear mp!

[sections are 95 in my school, except crim (45) and lps (15-20)].

;)

lipper

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This is how its done at my school. Prof. grades exams - students put anonymous numbers on exams so profs do not know whose exam belongs to who. prof submits exam grades to registrar, and registrar matches the grade to the student using the number. then registrar gives the grades back to the prof one final time, so the prof can figure in class participation. prof re-submits final grades to registrar. however, i think the prof is limited in how much they can lower or increase a students grade - i believe it is a third of a letter grade.
check the footnotes ya'll