Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: The study habits of others...  (Read 3457 times)

Trancer

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1262
  • Conan the Republican!!!
    • View Profile
The study habits of others...
« on: September 06, 2005, 09:40:52 PM »
I heard a million and one times never look at the study habits of your colleagues but sometimes i feel like such a slacker when i look at the effort some of my classmates apply to class... personally, im an attentive listener in class but i rarely take notes.  I highlight my cases right in the book (book brief) then writing a sentence or two in the margins to give myself an idea of wtf the case is about.  I noticed, however, that some people go all out with long sets of typed notes and they type up all their briefs... does anyone feel that this works better for them??
Its not the size of the army that counts, its the fury of the onslaught.
Seton Hall, August 05

Jackson Smith

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2005, 10:16:33 PM »
Ive typed up all of my briefs so far, but I am starting to feel that it is pointless and a waste of time.
3.5/160
In: UK($$), UArkansas($$), UPitt, UAkron($$)
Out: UDub, ND
Pending: Too many to list

dividedsky

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 121
  • 160 LSAT, 2.73 UGPA
    • View Profile
    • all bisco all the time
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2005, 11:32:43 PM »
I actually have a class that requires us to do a typed brief of every case.  Does this seem weird to anyone?
(I dont brief for any of my other classes, but I attribute that to personal laziness)

_retired_

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 448
    • View Profile
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2005, 11:37:47 PM »
Only Nazi profs "require" you to brief. I've heard of some requiring you to actually hand them in. 

That just sucks if thats you.  :-\

Leaf2001br

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 526
  • My two cents.
    • AOL Instant Messenger - Leaf2001br
    • View Profile
    • Isaac Online
    • Email
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2005, 01:54:43 AM »
My contracts prof. requires briefs, and he is going to collect them next week.  He doesn't care how informal they are though, and he just wants to be sure we're doing them because he believes they help.  It's not for a grade and he won't collect them again.  He certainly is no Nazi, in fact he's probably my favorite prof.

So obviously I do them for that class, but as far as the others, I have typed the briefs for most cases but that may change soon.  I have started experimenting with a couple of alternatives that I think I prefer:

I think that when I type briefs I include way too much information and the typing is wasting time.  I have found that when I handwrite the brief in my notebook, It stays extremely concise and yet I feel the key points remain clearly intact.  For my torts class I use yet another speed method.  After reading the case and book-briefing, I read the treatise my prof. wrote on tort law where it relates to the area (the treatise is practically an outline in itself), and I make sure to bring a copies of the canned briefs to class (actually they aren't commercial briefs, they were compiles last year by a 2L friend).

Just some ideas.  I guess only time will tell if I live to regret briefing in this way.  For one thing, outlining probably is easier if you type all your briefs, but I do feel more efficient now and I have more time to spend understanding the cases instead of typing.
"What is Legal?  What is Illegal?  What is 'Barely Legal'?"  - Ali G

_retired_

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 448
    • View Profile
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2005, 08:14:03 AM »
I dont think you will regret it.  In fact, Id be willing to bet you stop all together this semester and never look back.  Briefing is, and frankly, maticulous case reading is a waste of time.  When you start looking at old exams, it will dawn on you too.




tacojohn

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 989
  • "I voted. P. Diddy told us to vote"
    • ICQ Messenger - 176834534
    • MSN Messenger - tacojohniu@msn.com
    • AOL Instant Messenger - TacoJohnIU
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - tacojohniu@yahoo.com
    • View Profile
    • Fearfully Optimistic
    • Email
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2005, 11:30:55 AM »
I'm a firm believer in the idea that law school is just school.  Sure it's different concepts, different teaching techniques, different skills taught and emphasized, etc. but you still are just learning a lot of stuff.  So do whatever got you here.  Just realize you probably need to do more of it than in undergrad.

I'm still typing up elaborate briefs, in addition to briefing the LSC way, which I find as helpful in class as advertised, especially in torts where if you start scrolling through typed notes on the laptop, the prof flips out.  But the motivation is slipping.  I think when I start outlining, I'm going to jettison the briefs and stick to highlighting and writing notes in the margins.

lawgirl21

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 37
    • View Profile
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2005, 12:36:32 PM »
I say brief to the point that you understand the rule of law that the court is sythesizing from the facts of the case and the rules in other cases..

Unless it is of paramount importance to the courts reasoning, do you think a prof really is going to ask you about procedural history on and exam???  The only time I see this as relevant is if you have a prof that likes to ask about it in class, otherwise know if it is an appellate or trial case and move on..

Personally, the students that I see furiously working on briefs and typing elaborate class notes, often know the least about what we are actually learning.  Moreover, they usually never know how to apply the rules we derive..  Seems to me they are not studying smart..  I'm continually amazed at their naivete..  Maybe that's why I'm trying to transfer  ;)

GPA: 3.6
LSAT: 154, then 159

tacojohn

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 989
  • "I voted. P. Diddy told us to vote"
    • ICQ Messenger - 176834534
    • MSN Messenger - tacojohniu@msn.com
    • AOL Instant Messenger - TacoJohnIU
    • Yahoo Instant Messenger - tacojohniu@yahoo.com
    • View Profile
    • Fearfully Optimistic
    • Email
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2005, 02:27:42 PM »
I would really hesitate to criticize other's methods until grades come out.  The person you think is the dumbest or the most behind, or the most naive may get the best grades.

Trancer

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1262
  • Conan the Republican!!!
    • View Profile
Re: The study habits of others...
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2005, 07:24:22 PM »
Taco, i hope my initial post didnt bring you to the conclusion that i think that about my classmates.  I actually think the opposite that my method is the one that needs reconsidering.
Its not the size of the army that counts, its the fury of the onslaught.
Seton Hall, August 05