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Author Topic: Petition to Get Nashville School of Law ABA Approved or Provisionally Approved  (Read 3483 times)

lawforever

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Nashville School of Law has made a new mark in the legal education here in Tennessee. The school has been operating since its founding in 1911. It is time for Nashville School of Law to be approved or provisionally approved by the American Bar Association. Nashville School of Law has a new building with excellent professors and library to accommodate student's educational experiences. Here is an email that I had written to the ABA regarding the accreditation. I hope that you all can send ABA this letter or create your own to show that Nashville School of Law is well deserved for accreditation. Please visit this site for contact information: http://www.abanet.org/legaled/accreditation/acinfo.html and here is an email that I wrote to the accreditation officials:

Dear Sir or Madam:
 
I am concerned about the requirements that American Bar Association has implemented for its accreditation of law schools. Nashville School of Law was established in 1911 for people who could not afford to go to regular daytime law school due to work. This school has produced excellent attorneys, judges, politicians, business leaders, etc... in the state of Tennessee. Nashville School of Law has tried continuously in pursuit of accreditation with the ABA. The organization has repeatedly disproved its accreditation to this school.
 
Nashville School of Law has moved to a new building with larger library and two moot court facility that accommodates students to its educational experiences. The professors at the Nashville School of Law are qualified to teach with exceptional careers in their areas of practice. Please visit www.nashvilleschooloflaw.net .
 
I want to plea to the American Bar Association to at least take a look at the campus and the teaching structure of that school. Nashville School of Law is well equipped for ABA approval compared to many law schools across the country. Recognition by major law firms in Tennessee has also boosted it credibility within the legal profession. Please inquire to our school for accreditation purpose. The ABA will not regret to approve Nashville School of Law as an accredited ABA law school.
 
I thank you for your time.
 
 
Sincerely,
 
Christopher W.

divpatel77

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I agree with Christopher.

abclaw

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Is that exactly what you sent to ABA?  

The reason I ask is that perhaps you should consider passing it by your writing professor first. The numerous grammatical errors and generally poor writing may work against your intended goal.

Good luck.

Duner

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The last thing this country needs are more aba accredited law schools. I think the aba recognizes the over abundance of lawyers produced each year and isn't about to water down the profession even further by accrediting small name schools.

I could see major state schools getting the green flag, ie. umass, delaware, or other states that don't have any public law schools. other than that...who benefits from lincoln, nashville, etc. gaining accreditation?

divpatel77

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ABCLAW, what in the heck does that have to do with the issue concerning ABA and Nashville School of Law? I agree with Christopher on this matter.

abclaw

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Do you really fail to see the relevance of a well-written document to support a cause???  The ability to convey a position in a well-organized, consise, persuasive writing is 90 percent of what lawyering is all about.

jacy85

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Is that exactly what you sent to ABA? 

The reason I ask is that perhaps you should consider passing it by your writing professor first. The numerous grammatical errors and generally poor writing may work against your intended goal.

Good luck.

While I may or may not agree with the purpose behind the letter, I absolutely agree with abclaw on the point of grammar and writing skills.  When trying to attain accredation, a school wants to show that it produces graduates that will add to the profession, and such attorneys generally have adequate to excellent writing skills.  Sending a letter of support with mistakes throughout suggests otherwise about Nashville's students.

jhafstrom

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It seems that the school itself is not seeking full approval.  A cursory reading of the website provided the following statement-


In order to continue to fulfill its mission of providing high quality legal education at an affordable tuition, Nashville School of Law has never applied for ABA approval.

Danimal

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I live and work in Nashville. Not only is Nashville School of Law a total dump, but their graduates are universally regarded as the worst of the worst. ABA Accreditation is NOT on the horizon for Nashvul Skool O' Flaw

http://home.att.net/~cdnorman/words/law.html

Nashville School of Law Sucks

Nashville School of Law's hideous progeny breed within the Tennessee justice system, and promulgate its sucking evil into the very heart and soul of every citizen in the state.

by c.d. norman

The Cookeville Herald-Citizen is up to its old tricks -- only telling half the story. The following question appeared in the H-C's "I'd Like To Know" column on February 23.

    I saw a news clip on a Nashville TV station which said that attorneys graduating from the Nashville School of Law can not practice law outside of the State of Tennessee. Is this true? I have heard that several Cookeville attorneys, including attorneys in the DA's office, have their degrees from that school. Does this mean we are in the hands of unqualified attorneys?

To answer the question, columninst Ann Johnson turned to that paragon of legal virtue, District Attorney Bill Gibson. Gibson insisted that Nashville School of Law graduates are well qualified, and listed several present or former judges and politicians as examples of the school's fine product.

What Johnson's column did not tell you is that Bill Gibson, who barely got through high school, is a graduate of the Nashville School of Law. So what do you think he's going to say when asked if Nashville School of Law graduates are qualified? "Uh, gee, Ann....No, we're NOT qualified....In fact, I oughta be kicked out of here and sent back to the Holiday Inn to wash dishes. Except they wouldn't have me because I couldn't tell the hot water faucet from the cold water faucet."

And neither Johnson nor Gibson ever answered the reader's first question regarding the abililty of Nashville School of Law graduates to practice outside Tennessee.

The answer: Probably not. In most states, they can't practice immediately after graduation because the Nashvul Skool o' Law is not approved by the American Bar Association, or is not accredited by that state.

I'm sure that the Nashville School of Law has turned out many fine lawyers. But if you assume that the ABA's approval is a valid benchmark of the school's quality, then you must also assume that, on average, the school's graduates are less qualified than those who graduate from approved programs.

Because they cannot practice outside Tennessee, and because private law firms have no desire to take on under-qualified attorneys, the Nashville School of Law's graduates invariably enter public service. Billy Boy (or Billy Girl) hires on as an assistant DA, gets his name in the local paper a few times, then runs for district attorney or (even worse) a judge's office.

If Billy Boy plays the game and kisses up to the local bosses, his election will be assured. As a DA, Billy Boy hires other Nashville School of Law graduates to work as his assistant DAs (you don't think he'd hire someone smarter than himself, do you?). In time, his assistants go out into the world, as DAs and judges, where their legal bumblings affect the lives of ordinary people like you and me.

Thus, the Nashville School of Law's hideous progeny breed within the Tennessee justice system, and promulgate its sucking evil into the very heart and soul of every citizen in the state.

And you won't read THAT in the Herald-Citizen.

 

MADTowner

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I just checked out the webstie and that place looks ridiculous.  Take a look at the faculty they are predominately from that school and Vanderbilt.  I just don't understand why an attorney who graduates from a good school and has a decent career would waste their time teaching at this school. You think it would put a blemish on their career.