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Author Topic: Legal Reasoning  (Read 171821 times)

leadhu me token

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Re: Legal Reasoning
« Reply #440 on: February 27, 2009, 02:31:36 PM »

marshallah, is this the original video - I mean, I did a simple Google search and all I found was this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kt1csFO4pDM&feature=related

As you can see the woman in black is "stolen" at the end by the man on the horse, while your link leaves the woman unmoved, so to speak, by that man. This simple fact attracted my attention because gia's avatar shows them both on the horse.




When it comes to Greek music, there is one princess only: ANNA VISSI: listen to this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Owj8e1A7hsk


René, you've the wrong URL.

cpl

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All is One: Zeno Paradoxes
« Reply #441 on: February 28, 2009, 03:21:15 PM »


Ouroboros, Chrysopeia: the center reads "Hen to Pan, all is one"

Indeed. Jung saw the ouroboros as an archetype and the basic mandala of alchemy. He believed that alchemists, who in their own way know more about the nature of the individuation process than we moderns do, expressed this paradox through the symbol of the ouroboros, the snake that eats its own tail. In the age old image of the ouroboros lies the thought of devouring oneself and turning oneself into a circulatory process, for it was clear to the most astute alchemists that the prima materia of the art was man himself. The ouroboros is a dramatic symbol for the integration and assimilation of the opposite, i.e. of the shadow self. This feedback process is at the same time a symbol of immortality, since it is said of the ouroboros that he slays himself and brings himself to life again, fertilizes himself and gives birth to himself. This is much like the cycle of the Phoenix, the feminine archetype. Ouroboros symbolizes The One, who proceeds from the clash of opposites, and therefore constitutes the secret of the prima materia which unquestionably stems from man's unconsciousness.


Zeno's paradoxes are a set of problems generally thought to have been devised by Zeno of Elea to support Parmenides's doctrine that "all is one" and that, contrary to the evidence of our senses, the belief in plurality and change is mistaken, and in particular that motion is nothing but an illusion. Zeno's arguments are perhaps the first examples of a method of proof called reductio ad absurdum also known as proof by contradiction. They are also credited as a source of the dialectic method used by Socrates.

Achilles and the Tortoise

In a race, the quickest runner can never overtake the slowest, since the pursuer must first reach the point whence the pursued started, so that the slower must always hold a lead.
—Aristotle, Physics VI:9, 239b15


In the paradox of Achilles and the Tortoise, Achilles is in a footrace with the tortoise. Achilles allows the tortoise a head start of 100 feet. If we suppose that each racer starts running at some constant speed (one very fast and one very slow), then after some finite time, Achilles will have run 100 feet, bringing him to the tortoise's starting point. During this time, the tortoise has run a much shorter distance, for example 10 feet. It will then take Achilles some further time to run that distance, in which time the tortoise will have advanced farther; and then more time still to reach this third point, while the tortoise moves ahead. Thus, whenever Achilles reaches somewhere the tortoise has been, he still has farther to go. Therefore, because there are an infinite number of points Achilles must reach where the tortoise has already been -- he can never overtake the tortoise. Of course, simple experience tells us that Achilles will be able to overtake the tortoise, which is why this is a paradox.

The Dichotomy Paradox

"That which is in locomotion must arrive at the half-way stage before it arrives at the goal."
—Aristotle, Physics VI:9, 239b10


Suppose Homer wants to catch a stationary bus. Before he can get there, he must get halfway there. Before he can get halfway there, he must get a quarter of the way there. Before traveling a fourth, he must travel one-eighth; before an eighth, one-sixteenth; and so on.




This sequence also presents a second problem in that it contains no first distance to run, for any possible (finite) first distance could be divided in half, and hence would not be first after all. Hence, the trip cannot even begin. The paradoxical conclusion then would be that travel over any finite distance can neither be completed nor begun, and so all motion must be an illusion. This argument is called the Dichotomy because it involves repeatedly splitting a distance into two parts. It contains some of the same elements as the Achilles and the Tortoise paradox, but with a more apparent conclusion of motionlessness. It is also known as the Race Course paradox. Some, like Aristotle, regard the Dichotomy as really just another version of Achilles and the Tortoise.

Jon Jay

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Re: Bad Bedfellows
« Reply #442 on: March 10, 2009, 03:19:12 PM »

The ordinary religion of the law school classroom is a moral relativism tending toward nihilism, a pragmatism tending toward an amoral instrumentalism, a realism tending toward cynicism, an individualism tending toward atomism, and a faith in reason and democratic processes tending toward mere credulity and idolatry.


Well, gangsters and cops alike are neither black nor white; they represent the color of gray. A hidden identity between good and evil. The symbiotic relationship of hunter and hunted, embodied by men with guns pointed, arms at full extension, winding around each other in a distinctly homoerotic pas de deux.


Watch Face/Off for the same conclusion that can be drawn from:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTmgpst1I6w&feature=related

in_plain_english

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Re: Bad Bedfellows
« Reply #443 on: March 17, 2009, 06:34:57 PM »

Watch Face/Off for the same conclusion that can be drawn from:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTmgpst1I6w&feature=related


Hahaha - I am You and You are Me, who am I and who are You?

;)

e.pauli

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Don't blame Germany's school shooting on a video game
« Reply #444 on: March 18, 2009, 04:36:32 PM »

[...] Unfortunately, through the media we are also conditioning children to kill; and when they are frightened and angry, the conditioning kicks in.

[...]


Just do not exaggerate the role of the media on people and children - for instance, a hell of a lot of people tried to blame the latest Germany school shooting on video games. Read the DT's article for an interesting take on the issue:

Nobody understands serial killers, and blaming computer games for violence makes as much sense as blaming Hamlet, says Michael Deacon.


In the frame: the video game Counter Strike

Forgive me for the groaning obviousness of this statement, but I am not in the least qualified to explain the behavior of a serial killer. I would venture to suggest that nobody else is, either. But I am a journalist, and journalists pride themselves on their ability to offer explanations for all manner of things they can't possibly understand. Take the German newspaper Die Welt. After the 17-year-old Tim Kretschmer shot 15 people dead in Germany last week, Die Welt used this headline: "Gun rampager played violent video games" (in German, anyway). Other newspapers made the same observation. It's said that one of Kretschmer's favourites was the shooting game Counter Strike. Just as it was said, in 1999, that the teenage gunmen at Columbine were fans of the shooting game Doom. Indeed, it's common for stories about teenage murderers to mention their love of gory games or rock lyrics.

It puzzles me, this implication that violent "low art" is to blame. "High art" often contains shocking violence, too, yet one never reads an article that implies a connection between "high art" and murder. Nobody, I feel fairly sure, would suggest that Shakespeare is a dangerous influence on the young. Nobody would fret that reading Hamlet might encourage an adolescent loner to murder his uncle, or that Titus Andronicus might prompt him to butcher 2 men, bake their remains in a pie and feed it to the men's mother. Nobody is campaigning for the removal from the national curriculum of Romeo and Juliet on the grounds that it glamorises suicide. Like video games, literature has a habit of presenting vile characters in a favorable light. The narrator of A Clockwork Orange is a rapist – a witty, intelligent rapist. The narrator of Lolita is a paedophile – a witty, intelligent paedophile. While I was a teenager, I managed to read both these books without a horrified teacher, parent or indeed journalist dashing them from my hand. Maybe I'm naïve. Maybe one's taste in entertainment can influence one's behavior. Maybe there are devotees of Nintendo's Super Mario games who, short of cash in the recession, are butting bricks in the expectation that gold coins will emerge. Super Mario does it all the time. A facile argument, you may snort. But I'm not sure it's any more facile than the idea that a murderer's actions can be attributed to video games. Video games are a recent phenomenon. Murder is not. We can't hope to understand the latter activity, but we might try to be more understanding about the former.

* Blogs have been seething about the Performing Right Society for Music, which has had the temerity to tell YouTube that, if it wishes to continue showing music videos, it should pay more money for them.

According to a survey, you see, 61% of under-25s believe that music should be free of charge. Never mind that the creation and availability of music depends on the hard work of many people, be they musicians or record label staff. Why should they be paid for their efforts? I think this is an exciting economic model. Food, clothes, cars, houses – all these things should be free, too. Of course, in order to provide them, everybody in the world will have to work without pay, but I'm sure the survey's respondents will be happy to do their share.

* Facebook is rolling out a new design. In a bid to fend off its rival, Twitter, it has made itself look remarkably like... Twitter.

All I can say is: @facebook UR making UR site look a h8ful mess & every1 sez they R leaving U. K thx bai.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/4991340/Dont-blame-Germanys-school-shooting-on-a-video-game.html

S u z y s

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Re: Legal Reasoning
« Reply #445 on: March 22, 2009, 05:53:54 PM »

Better to abstain than to error - case in point, major 19th-century Western philosophers such as Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Schlegel, Hegel misinterpreted the Buddha's teaching of nirvana as a life-detesting and negative annihilation of the the individual. They imagined Buddhism as a religion that was, as Nietzsche put it, a "negation of the world" - such portrayals were more a reflection of what was happening in Europe at the time when the collapse of traditional European hierarchies and values, the specter of atheism, and the rise of racism and social revolts were shaking European societies, rather than an accurate description of Buddhist thought.


No, not really Nora!
All power is derived from the consent of the governed.

rider

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Re: Legal Reasoning
« Reply #446 on: March 22, 2009, 06:32:41 PM »

Better to abstain than to error - case in point, major 19th-century Western philosophers such as Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Schlegel, Hegel misinterpreted the Buddha's teaching of nirvana as a life-detesting and negative annihilation of the the individual. They imagined Buddhism as a religion that was, as Nietzsche put it, a "negation of the world" - such portrayals were more a reflection of what was happening in Europe at the time when the collapse of traditional European hierarchies and values, the specter of atheism, and the rise of racism and social revolts were shaking European societies, rather than an accurate description of Buddhist thought.


No, not really Nora!


What do you mean Suzys that Schopenhauer/Nietzsche & Co. got it right when they depicted Buddhism as a "negation of the world" religion?

abethcop

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Re: All is One: Zeno Paradoxes
« Reply #447 on: April 03, 2009, 06:59:09 PM »


This sequence also presents a second problem in that it contains no first distance to run, for any possible (finite) first distance could be divided in half, and hence would not be first after all. Hence, the trip cannot even begin. The paradoxical conclusion then would be that travel over any finite distance can neither be completed nor begun, and so all motion must be an illusion. This argument is called the Dichotomy because it involves repeatedly splitting a distance into two parts. It contains some of the same elements as the Achilles and the Tortoise paradox, but with a more apparent conclusion of motionlessness. It is also known as the Race Course paradox. Some, like Aristotle, regard the Dichotomy as really just another version of Achilles and the Tortoise.

newb poster, but I remember this one.  I can't recall the name right now, but the listener to this paradox politely responded to this argument by kicking a stone with his foot.  As the stone moved some feet ahead, he said something like, "Look, it moved."  I remember that from one of my first philosophy classes and I thought it was hilarious.  In situations like this, it is only our mind that gets in the way from accepting the reality of the situation.  That's what I gather anyway.
Incoming Lewis & Clark 1L

Q.Stud.

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Re: The Seamless Monument
« Reply #448 on: April 04, 2009, 09:18:36 PM »

Is this similar to what you'd come to realize were you to hold a mirror up to a mirror?


Great signature graft! Interesting avatar as well!
Plan to be spontaneous tomorrow.

phreejazz

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Re: Legal Reasoning
« Reply #449 on: April 20, 2009, 07:43:47 PM »

Better to abstain than to error - case in point, major 19th-century Western philosophers such as Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Schlegel, Hegel misinterpreted the Buddha's teaching of nirvana as a life-detesting and negative annihilation of the the individual. They imagined Buddhism as a religion that was, as Nietzsche put it, a "negation of the world" - such portrayals were more a reflection of what was happening in Europe at the time when the collapse of traditional European hierarchies and values, the specter of atheism, and the rise of racism and social revolts were shaking European societies, rather than an accurate description of Buddhist thought.


No, not really Nora!


Of course, treating Buddhism like it's a monolithic religion is a mistake.  Some strands of Buddhism are definitely more world/life-negating than others, some quite radically so.  Same goes for Nietzsche, for that matter: his thought "dances" and spins.  What he means with world negation, nihilism, etc. isn't a stright-forward proposition.