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Author Topic: obtaining recommendations for transferring  (Read 1922 times)

jewelbomb

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obtaining recommendations for transferring
« on: July 23, 2005, 12:29:30 AM »
Question for those that have transferred successfully- How difficult was it to obtain recommendations from your 1L Profs? I would assume that if you got the grades to make transferring a viable option that the Profs would want to keep you at your original school. Further, how did you go about making a favorable impression/standing out with the majority of 1l classes being so large? Did the Profs even know who you were?

I had a policy in my undergrad of making stupid excuses to see a Prof during office hours just so they knew who I was. Even if the class was easy, I would just make up some stupid question in an attempt to stand out. Devious? A bit, but it seemed to work for me. Would this technique work in LS?

GA_Kristi

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Re: obtaining recommendations for transferring
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2005, 09:32:17 AM »
I knew I wanted to transfer from day one, so I went out of my way to get to know several professors.  Early on it was easy to tell who was approachable and who wasn't.  I picked out the professor from my favorite class because I could go in and talk to him about going into a career in that area of the law.  He got to know me very well and agreed to write a rec.  Only problem was he left our school mid-year.  I then did the same thing all over again with my new professor in that class.  It was really easy because they were both great guys and both were thrilled to talk to a student who was passionate about their subject area. 

The other prof I got a rec from was my legal writing and research prof because that class is really small and you really get to know the prof.  She's also an adjunct and only teaches that one class, so she's not as attached to the school as a tenured prof would be and was totally supportive of me transferring. 

I would just zero in on the faculty you think are most approachable and make sure you get face time in their office all year.  Getting recs really isn't that hard.
"I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is the moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious." - Vince Lombardi

jewelbomb

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Re: obtaining recommendations for transferring
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2005, 06:26:50 PM »
Thanks for the info. I too know that I want to transfer even though class does not start for about two weeks. It has less to do with the school that I will be attending and more to do with geography. Basically, after living in the Bay Area for a few months I have decided that itís overrated and annoying (just my opinion, Iím more of an East Coast kind of guy). Anyway, I donít want to tie myself to the area for the foreseeable future.

Anyone else? I know that many people on this board have transferred successfully. What were your experiences with getting recommendations?

 
 

GA_Kristi

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Re: obtaining recommendations for transferring
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2005, 11:37:46 PM »
I can totally relate.  I moved to Orange County this time last year and knew within a few weeks that I couldn't handle being out there for 3 years.  I'm from Atlanta, so not only am I an East Coast kinda girl, I'm a Southern girl!  :)  Ecstatic to be going to UF this year!

Good luck to you.  Make the most of 1L!
"I firmly believe that any man's finest hour, the greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear, is the moment when he has worked his heart out in a good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle-victorious." - Vince Lombardi

rapunzel

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Re: obtaining recommendations for transferring
« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2005, 01:23:48 PM »
I don't think it is at all devious to network.  Profs enjoy talking to smart and interested students.  You won't click with them all but if you mesh with one or two by the end of the year that's great.  I avoid the after-class line of people with questions.  I tend to show up during office hours and say something like, "Prof B, I saw the article in the paper where they quoted you about..."  People like to talk to people who are interested in what they have to say.

Many of my friends have never spoken to any of our profs.  I can't fathom why not.  I got a judicial internship through one prof and some great guidance about which firm to choose for my 2L summer.  I still stay in contact with one prof from undergrad and one from grad school with whom I became friends.  They remain valuble contacts.

tulanelawman

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Re: obtaining recommendations for transferring
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2005, 07:27:55 PM »
I too used to speak up in undergrad classes, though I admit I would even ask questions I knew to be intelligent, but slightly off base so the professor could gently correct me, but I would get credit for participation.

At first, it didn't seem worthwhile to participate in law school. First, at Tulane, at least, no credit is available for participation. (All grades are based on end-of-the-year anonymous exams) Second, you get pegged as a gunner by your fellow classmates.

In the end, I ended up participating just because I'm that sort of guy. I love to be right and to hash out the details. It is why I chose law school and not b school. I had considered transferring immediately upon gaining entrance. Tulane was my safety school and new orleans didn't interest me. New Orleans came to grow on me and it turned out that one of my professors convinced me to apply to transfer! So getting her to write me a recommendation was no problem. I felt out other professors whose class I had gotten an A in.

One indiciated that he felt conflicted and so I didn't ask him. Another was the Dean and so I figured he would be conflicted. The last was happy to do it. All or your professors will likely have gone to a top5 law school and would be happy to see you do well too.

lawgirl21

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Re: obtaining recommendations for transferring
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2005, 12:51:02 PM »
Any advice on getting LORs from profs when you plan to stay in the same area geographically?  Also, how do you approach the profs about it?  What time (chronologically) is a good time to ask? 
GPA: 3.6
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Contract2008

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Re: obtaining recommendations for transferring
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2005, 04:50:47 PM »
One indiciated that he felt conflicted and so I didn't ask him. Another was the Dean and so I figured he would be conflicted. The last was happy to do it. All or your professors will likely have gone to a top5 law school and would be happy to see you do well too.

What if none of your professors are from Top 5 law schools.  Actually none of them have gone to a Top 14 law school and about half of them are from Tier 2. (I am at a "decent" non-Tier 4 law school).

Don't law school know that all the profs have to say about you are reflected in the grade they gave you? 


istically

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Re: obtaining recommendations for transferring
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2005, 06:08:50 PM »
Quote
I had a policy in my undergrad of making stupid excuses to see a Prof during office hours just so they knew who I was. Even if the class was easy, I would just make up some stupid question in an attempt to stand out. Devious? A bit, but it seemed to work for me. Would this technique work in LS?

It'd work only if you're willing to offer a little bit more to your professor than you did in undergrad school.