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Author Topic: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?  (Read 6092 times)

OGRonC

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2006, 02:39:14 AM »
It depends on the T2.  In NYC, that poster is absolutely right--if you're not top 25% and you're in debt to a local LS below Fordham, time to apply for food stamps.

Newbie,

Don't listen to some of the crazy posters on this thread. They have nothing better to do then screw around on the law school board (guess you can tell what kind of social life they have). If I were you, I would choose Hofstra. NY is a very competitive legal market place-- ls rankings count. BTW, most lawyers have not gone to T1 law schools and have done very well for themselves. It is simply ridiculous to believe that you would find a good job if you attend one of the 164 (non-T1). If that were true, 164 law schools would cease to exist. Go with Hofstra, you'll be fine.



THIS IS ABSOLUTELY WRONG.  Most lawyers who hae "done very well"--in the country, not just NYC--come from the first tier, specifically the T14.  The other 164 law schools either exist to serve smaller secondary markets or to milk money from naive students like the OP who are about to have their lives ruined.

Most lawyers in New York in decent jobs (and by decent I mean enough to support yourself) are from the T14, and to some degree, Fordham.

If these are your choices and you don't want to leave New York, PLEASE DON'T GO TO LAW SCHOOL.  You will regret it when you're 150K in debt and your unemployment benefits have run out.  For people who want to be NYC lawyers but didn't graduate at the top of their class at their expensive TTT, bankruptcy and a lifetme of menial jobs are a more likely outcome than any sort of legal career.

remapin

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2006, 08:32:23 PM »

It depends on the T2. In NYC, that poster is absolutely right -- if you're not top 25% and you're in debt to a local LS below Fordham, time to apply for food stamps.


I'd say top 5% and it has to be a T1! Otherwise, time for food stamps!

chapeer

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2006, 02:44:17 AM »
It depends on the T2.  In NYC, that poster is absolutely right--if you're not top 25% and you're in debt to a local LS below Fordham, time to apply for food stamps.

Newbie,

Don't listen to some of the crazy posters on this thread. They have nothing better to do then screw around on the law school board (guess you can tell what kind of social life they have). If I were you, I would choose Hofstra. NY is a very competitive legal market place-- ls rankings count. BTW, most lawyers have not gone to T1 law schools and have done very well for themselves. It is simply ridiculous to believe that you would find a good job if you attend one of the 164 (non-T1). If that were true, 164 law schools would cease to exist. Go with Hofstra, you'll be fine.



THIS IS ABSOLUTELY WRONG.  Most lawyers who hae "done very well"--in the country, not just NYC--come from the first tier, specifically the T14.  The other 164 law schools either exist to serve smaller secondary markets or to milk money from naive students like the OP who are about to have their lives ruined.

Most lawyers in New York in decent jobs (and by decent I mean enough to support yourself) are from the T14, and to some degree, Fordham.

If these are your choices and you don't want to leave New York, PLEASE DON'T GO TO LAW SCHOOL.  You will regret it when you're 150K in debt and your unemployment benefits have run out.  For people who want to be NYC lawyers but didn't graduate at the top of their class at their expensive TTT, bankruptcy and a lifetme of menial jobs are a more likely outcome than any sort of legal career.

Absolutely OG! Here it is a post pointing to the same conclusion your draw ,

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/topic,1925.msg27188.html#msg27188

Erapitt

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2006, 06:52:53 AM »
Hofstra Law is a puss filled toilet.  I had a friend or two unfortunate enough to go there and they got out asap.  They had nothing good to say about the school.  Any school that contacts me for a full scholarship strictly based on an LSAT score without any solicitation on my part makes me question their credibility.
Attending GW in Fall '06

369

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #24 on: March 01, 2006, 04:24:21 AM »
Any school that contacts me for a full scholarship strictly based on an LSAT score without any solicitation on my part makes me question their credibility.

Those schools are called LSAT whores, E!
Sooorry!

entitlement

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2006, 07:15:16 AM »
Approximately 3 out of 4 lawyers practiced privately, either as partners in law firms or in solo practices. Most salaried lawyers held positions in government or with corporations or nonprofit organizations. The greatest number of lawyers working in government were employed at the local level. In the Federal Government, lawyers work for many different agencies, but are concentrated in the Departments of Justice, Treasury, and Defense. Many salaried lawyers working outside of government are employed as house counsel by public utilities, banks, insurance companies, real estate agencies, manufacturing firms, and other business firms and nonprofit organizations. Some also have part-time independent practices, while others work part time as lawyers and full time in another occupation.

Growth in demand for lawyers will be limited as businesses, in an effort to reduce costs, increasingly use large accounting firms and paralegals to perform some of the same functions that lawyers do. For example, accounting firms may provide employee-benefit counseling, process documents, or handle various other services previously performed by a law firm. Also, mediation and dispute resolution increasingly are being used as alternatives to litigation. Competition for job openings should continue to be keen because of the large number of students graduating from law school each year. Perhaps as a result of competition for attorney positions, lawyers are increasingly finding work in non-traditional areas for which legal training is an asset, but not normally a requirement—for example, administrative, managerial, and business positions in banks, insurance firms, real estate companies, government agencies, and other organizations.

As in the past, some graduates may have to accept positions in areas outside of their field of interest or for which they feel overqualified. Some recent law school graduates who have been unable to find permanent positions are turning to the growing number of temporary staffing firms that place attorneys in short-term jobs until they are able to secure full-time positions. This service allows companies to hire lawyers on an "as-needed" basis and permits beginning lawyers to develop practical skills while looking for permanent positions.

The number of self-employed lawyers is expected to decrease slowly, reflecting the difficulty of establishing a profitable new practice in the face of competition from larger, established law firms. Moreover, the growing complexity of law, which encourages specialization, along with the cost of maintaining up-to-date legal research materials, favors larger firms. Employment growth for lawyers will continue to be concentrated in salaried jobs, as businesses and all levels of government employ a growing number of staff attorneys and as employment in the legal services industry grows.

For lawyers who wish to work independently, establishing a new practice will probably be easiest in small towns and expanding suburban areas. In such communities, competition from larger, established law firms is likely to be less keen than in big cities, and new lawyers may find it easier to become known to potential clients.

amba

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #26 on: March 11, 2006, 08:15:08 AM »

As in the past, some graduates may have to accept positions in areas outside of their field of interest or for which they feel overqualified. Some recent law school graduates who have been unable to find permanent positions are turning to the growing number of temporary staffing firms that place attorneys in short-term jobs until they are able to secure full-time positions. This service allows companies to hire lawyers on an "as-needed" basis and permits beginning lawyers to develop practical skills while looking for permanent positions.


Great career prospectives!

8

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #27 on: May 10, 2006, 06:37:04 PM »
Hofstra got screwed in the ass this year .. tier 3
Only sick music makes money today.

jtech

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #28 on: May 16, 2006, 08:58:19 PM »
Ignorant brats make the majority of these posts; they simply regurgitate what they heard while hanging out at Starbucks.

I realize "big law" implements an unofficial caste system. The foundation of this system is law school rankings and class rank. Regardless of this fact, I know many successful attorneys that attended tier 3 and 4 law schools. I define success based on income and these individuals are easily making over 300k a year. Anyone who completes a J.D. program and passes the bar exam is empowered with enormous knowledge and credibility. This gives them a competitive advantage over the majority of society. Therefore, if an attorney is not successful, its not because their school sucked its because they don't have what it takes.

If you are going to be a lawyer start thinking for yourself. Don't fall into the trap of thinking the only way you can make money is by working for a big firm. Otherwise, you will be nothing more then a robot and robots are not good lawyers.

seine

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Re: Confused.... Accepted into Hofstra, NY Law and Pace ... which one?
« Reply #29 on: September 09, 2006, 07:19:27 AM »
Anything in the NYC ranking lower than Fordham should be disregarded period.