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Author Topic: Outlining...  (Read 972 times)

Godot

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Outlining...
« on: July 05, 2005, 02:08:32 PM »
How do you make your outlines? What do you put in them? How often do you work on them?

Tell me about outlines...I'm a 1L and looking for suggestions of methods that have worked for others.

Thanks!
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Krisace

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Re: Outlining...
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2005, 01:17:00 AM »
In my opinion, I think that keeping your outlines short and simple is the best way to go. 

Firts of all I wouldnt wait around to start; I started the first week.  Every Sunday I would go through whatever secions in each class we'd studied, put a heading, and put in each rule of law or test that was the essence of each case we read.  There shouldn't be more than one or two things that you should be getting out of each case because each one is in the casebook for a special reason.  (i.e. I realized in halfway through the first smester that in Torts when we were studying negligence that I didn't have to have written down the definition of "misrepresentaion" that was mentioned in the case).

Anyways, keep it simple.  I then made flashcards each Sunday for each rule of law and studied each week as I went.  Studying for finals was then no sweat.  I know it sounds like a lot but if you read and brief every case, outline/flashcard (if flashcarding works for you...for some it doesn't) every week, and do about 10 practice tests for each class I guarantee a successful year.

I've never been in the top 1/3 of any school HS or college and just finished somewhere in the top 5-10%.  The hardest workers reap the rewards in law school.  Good luck!.

aryeal

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Re: Outlining...
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2005, 10:15:50 AM »
Working on outlines every week is a must in my opinion.  I put off outlining until I was preparing for finals and my grades were mediocre.  My reaction time on exams was slower than it should have been because I didn't have data firmly entrenched in my brain. This year it's a whole new ballgame.