Law School Discussion

State residency?

State residency?
« on: March 30, 2005, 09:57:57 AM »
If attending school out of state, will schools allow you to apply for residency (qualify for in-state tuition)after 1L?

Re: State residency?
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2005, 10:41:10 AM »
Some will, some won't. I know New Jersey allows this. But Illinois does not. You'd have to speak with the amissions office or fin aid office of each school. Or at least one from each state.

Re: State residency?
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2005, 07:55:48 PM »
UC schools will allow it, if you move over the summer you will have a year of residency when the financial aid and tuition is set for the next year.  You have to prove that CA will be your "permanent" place of residence though which is a little stickier.

ormachea

Re: State residency?
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2005, 09:33:00 PM »
Texas is REALLY tricky from what I hear...

manserunt

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Re: State residency?
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2005, 02:15:36 PM »
I also read that, for acceptable California residency, you have to maintain a California mailing address during the summer.  I think they consider you no longer a resident if you, say, decide to have a summer associateship in NY...

bruin

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Re: State residency?
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2005, 02:20:06 PM »
I believe that is true. But CA seems to be the easiest state to get residency in. Michigan and Virginia will not allow you to apply for residency after 1L, Texas IS tricky, like michigan and virginia, I believe.

ormachea

Re: State residency?
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2005, 02:25:29 PM »
Unless you buy land, TX and VA are damn near impossible. Even if you buy land they're tricky.

Marco

Re: State residency?
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2005, 12:44:27 PM »
Colorado allows it after 1st year...states it in their catalog and I asked on the phone to make sure...but they denied me so that really makes no difference now!

U of Utah allows it after 40 hours...so your first year and a summer (summer rates are all in state by the way if i'm not mistaken)...then you are a resident. 

Tennessee, like many others I think, never give you a straight answer.  It is possible, but it takes more than changing your driver's license.  Some factors include buying a house, having a job offer after your second year, marrying a resident. 

Re: State residency?
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2005, 08:07:02 AM »
I hear PA is difficult... was wondering if anyone has experience with PA residency and if buying a home would impact your chances of gaining residency for 2L and 3L