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Author Topic: Canned Briefs  (Read 5017 times)

btideroll

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2005, 05:16:24 PM »
Tell you what...and I really do mean this...don't get canned briefs.  I can promise you right now that you'll do well in all of your classes if you read and brief every case yourself.  Just watch when halfway through the first semester people stop briefing.  You'll get the process and the material so much better than others. 

I finished top 10% and I've never been in the top third of anything, simply by doing the work: reading, briefing etc.  It may take more time but believe me, for the few people that do it, it pays.  Canned briefs will only tempt you to get lazy.

what if you don't understand a part of the case, or can't identify its correct parts. What do you, or how do you figure it out the correct material so that you aren't studying an incorrect brief?

jacy85

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2005, 05:36:19 PM »
I've heard pretty much what has been said from a lot of students.  The way I see it, using canned briefs to prep you for reading your case will help ensure that you're on the right track, but should never be a crutch.  And there will definitely be days where you don't have the time to read and brief on your own.  I'm sure legal rsrch and writing due dates get in the way of usual study, and I'd rather go in with something than nothing so I have a least a basic idea of what's being discussed.

colforbin

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2005, 05:47:30 PM »
I have and plan to read and brief all of the cases. If I get stuck, I'll consult the canned brief, just as a supplement, not as a replacement.

birddog

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2005, 06:27:52 PM »
I'm fairly certain that there is something canned for Yeazell.  Go to Barrister's Books.com to see what's out there.  Then see if you can find them cheaper elsewhere. 

dkast

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2005, 08:42:36 PM »

I finished top 10% and I've never been in the top third of anything, simply by doing the work: reading, briefing etc.  It may take more time but believe me, for the few people that do it, it pays.  Canned briefs will only tempt you to get lazy.

I disagree, if you have an aptitude in which you are able to spot the issues, rules of law and how they are applied to the case, canned briefs will be helpful in class participation.

If you usually annotate the material facts while reading the case, canned briefs will enable you to recite them to your professor in a much more orginized manner.  I'm not saying don't read the cases and spot the issues, rules of law and reasoning, merely the canned briefs will save you the time "wasted" organizing them when called upon to recite them to your professor.


lincolnsgrandson

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2005, 08:59:49 PM »
Yeah krisace - you have to stop this attitude that goes, "I'm in the top 10% I did it this way, and therefore you should do everything the way I did.  Did I mention that I'm in the top ten percent?"

Students can be successful studying in different ways.

For the record, I'm not a fan of canned briefs - they often just add up to more reading and blurring of issues.  But sometimes it's convenient to peek at them, if you get them as hand me downs.  And I've known several good students who use them.

Better to get used to using LexisNexis and WestLaw. 

sharmaine73

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2005, 10:11:42 PM »
lincolnsgrandson:

Are you saying Lexis and Westlaw has case briefs? 

lincolnsgrandson

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #17 on: August 22, 2005, 10:40:36 PM »
No, not "case briefs" in the way legallines does.

Lexis and Westlaw have "headnotes" (that list all the rules established and reaffirmed in the case) and summaries to introduce the cases. 
Your school might only give you limited access to the online legal database systems, but you would still be able to look cases up by their citation. 
It also helps where it's sometimes a pain to determine basic facts from your casebook - like, for instance, who is the plaintiff and defendant. 

Give it a try - I think there were a number of first year students in my class that studied this way, but I didn't figure it out until second year. 

If you have full access to the databases, even better - you can get used to Shepardizing cases and doing legal research, while at the same time preparing you for the class.
Warning - I know that most first year students prefer to use the casebook than study with Lexis or Westlaw.  But I have found it the best way to study for classes, and at the same time better preparation for any other legal work I have done.

dft

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #18 on: August 22, 2005, 11:36:52 PM »
I'm fairly certain that there is something canned for Yeazell.  Go to Barrister's Books.com to see what's out there.  Then see if you can find them cheaper elsewhere. 

there is. i have it.

($)

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2005, 01:51:35 PM »
I dissagree to a point.  I finished in the top 10% and I used legalines only as a support.  I would quickly read the canned brief and then read the case.  ALWAYS READ THE CASES!  After reading both, I would compelte by brief (usually book brief).

Another thing to remember is to find out if your prof likes to have you recite the cases in your exams.  Example - World Wide Vokswagon, Gore v. BMW...  In those situations, you better know those cases.
Reading the canned briefs before the cases helped me a lot in Civ Pro. I still needed to read the cases, esp. as the prof. liked to call on me (a lot) and always wanted case info in excruciating detail. But reading the canned brief helped to get the primary idea down, and then I'd read/book brief.

The problem with canned briefs is that you have to figure out some way to place them ... I mean, it's not such a good idea to bring the actual Legalines or Casenotes to class, unless you tear the pages and place the particular pages you're be reading inside some other book ... alternatively, you can scan canned briefs and then read directly from your laptop if your name is called.