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Author Topic: Canned Briefs  (Read 5142 times)

mfitz

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Canned Briefs
« on: June 27, 2005, 04:20:30 PM »
I just found out what my casebooks are going to be.  The bookstore hasn't received orders from my property and criminal law profs yet.  I've been looking at Legalines, Apen's canned briefs, and High Court Case Summaries, and the only casebook I have that seems to have canned briefs written for it is my civil procedure book.  I'd really like to have canned briefs for my other classes--can anyone recommend anything?

Civil Procedure, Yeazell, 6th ed.

Contracts:  Cases and Materials, Murray, 5th ed.

Tort Law, Phillips, 3rd ed.
Accepts: Akron, Washburn, Hamline, Valpo, Mercer, Baylor (Sum), Arkansas, Ohio Northern, Tennessee,  Ave Maria, U of St. Thomas, St. Louis, S Carolina, Hofstra, U Florida.
Rejects: George Mason, UGA (blah).

I'm going to Tennessee!!!!!!

dft

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2005, 05:23:12 PM »
good question

Coregram

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2005, 07:06:34 PM »
Try Casenotes Legal Briefs at Barnes and Noble's website for contracts.

For Torts, you might try one keyed to another casebook if you really think you need one.  The major tort cases are in pretty much every casebook.


swordfish

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2005, 08:36:04 PM »
What exactly are canned briefs?

slacker

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #4 on: June 27, 2005, 10:49:42 PM »
Also try ebay. Sometimes you can find used current or older editions for cheaper than new. The older editions may have a few cases missing, but will most likely be mostly complete. (On the converse - if you're buying used, confirm the edition.)

A brief is a summary of a case that breaks out info like the point of law addressed, the procedural posture, the arguments, the holding, etc. You can do this yourself, but sometimes it's helpful to have someone do the work for you -- that's where the canned briefs come in. If you're going to get these, find out what casebook you'll be using and get the edition keyed to your casebook, so that the relevant cases are included.

Krisace

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2005, 01:28:24 AM »
Tell you what...and I really do mean this...don't get canned briefs.  I can promise you right now that you'll do well in all of your classes if you read and brief every case yourself.  Just watch when halfway through the first semester people stop briefing.  You'll get the process and the material so much better than others. 

I finished top 10% and I've never been in the top third of anything, simply by doing the work: reading, briefing etc.  It may take more time but believe me, for the few people that do it, it pays.  Canned briefs will only tempt you to get lazy.

duma

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2005, 02:13:58 AM »
I finished top 10% and I've never been in the top third of anything, simply by doing the work: reading, briefing etc.  It may take more time but believe me, for the few people that do it, it pays.  Canned briefs will only tempt you to get lazy.
I second that... all of it.

Coregram

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #7 on: June 28, 2005, 09:10:31 AM »
I agree about not using the canned briefs as a substitute for your own reading.  Professors know about them and get them as well; so don't be surprised if you get asked about some facts or issues that are in the case but not in the canned brief.  Also, sometimes they miss the points the professor is emphasizing.

However, I found reading and briefing cases easier and more efficient if I read the canned brief first as a preview for the case.

And "for emergency use only," when circumstances prevent you from doing a thorough job on the reading, they give you a quick read of the case so you can follow along in class.   

rezipsa

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #8 on: June 28, 2005, 12:03:53 PM »
I finished top 10% and I've never been in the top third of anything, simply by doing the work: reading, briefing etc.  It may take more time but believe me, for the few people that do it, it pays.  Canned briefs will only tempt you to get lazy.

I dissagree to a point.  I finished in the top 10% and I used legalines only as a support.  I would quickly read the canned brief and then read the case.  ALWAYS READ THE CASES!  After reading both, I would compelte by brief (usually book brief).

Another thing to remember is to find out if your prof likes to have you recite the cases in your exams.  Example - World Wide Vokswagon, Gore v. BMW...  In those situations, you better know those cases.


slacker

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Re: Canned Briefs
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2005, 06:21:12 PM »
I dissagree to a point.  I finished in the top 10% and I used legalines only as a support.  I would quickly read the canned brief and then read the case.  ALWAYS READ THE CASES!  After reading both, I would compelte by brief (usually book brief).

Another thing to remember is to find out if your prof likes to have you recite the cases in your exams.  Example - World Wide Vokswagon, Gore v. BMW...  In those situations, you better know those cases.
Reading the canned briefs before the cases helped me a lot in Civ Pro. I still needed to read the cases, esp. as the prof. liked to call on me (a lot) and always wanted case info in excruciating detail. But reading the canned brief helped to get the primary idea down, and then I'd read/book brief.