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Author Topic: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule  (Read 5208 times)

bkbk5

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Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« on: June 15, 2005, 01:14:50 PM »
I took a friend's priceless advice and bought Planet Law School II.  I was up until 12:00am last night reading it.  I couldn't put it down; it has totally changed my perspective!  :o  I knew law school was going to tough, but I had NO IDEA how much I was going to be relying on myself to learn the law.  WOW!  Talk about an eyeopeing experience last night. I've committed myself to a (modified) PLS2 6-8 week prep course.
Anyway, I just purchased Delany's "Learning Legal Reasoning" and next paycheck I'll be purchasing a set of E&E Primers and the LEEWS program.  How useful is "Learning Legal Reasoing?"  I want to read as much as I can, but I also want to study smart (I'm such an Atticus Falcon protege).
So, what is the concensus about Delany's "Learning Legal Reasoning?" and the PLS2 prep schedule?

jdohno

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2005, 02:00:44 PM »
I wrote you a PM. Also look at another thread that I think was titled PLS2. http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/students/index.php/topic,1935.0.html
HTH

I took a friend's priceless advice and bought Planet Law School II.  I was up until 12:00am last night reading it.  I couldn't put it down; it has totally changed my perspective!  :o  I knew law school was going to tough, but I had NO IDEA how much I was going to be relying on myself to learn the law.  WOW!  Talk about an eyeopeing experience last night. I've committed myself to a (modified) PLS2 6-8 week prep course.
Anyway, I just purchased Delany's "Learning Legal Reasoning" and next paycheck I'll be purchasing a set of E&E Primers and the LEEWS program.  How useful is "Learning Legal Reasoing?"  I want to read as much as I can, but I also want to study smart (I'm such an Atticus Falcon protege).
So, what is the concensus about Delany's "Learning Legal Reasoning?" and the PLS2 prep schedule?

lincolnsgrandson

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2005, 07:05:39 AM »
dude, relax.
Planet Law School is a good book, and a good counterpart to Law School Confidential.
But all that stuff you are doing before you begin classes won't help a lot.  Almost no one takes prep courses before starting, and yet we've done okay.
No matter how prepared you are or think you are when you begin in August, the other students will catch up to you soon enough. 
It's good to some reading about law over the summer, but I don't think any of us would recommend reading casebooks or assignments.

I recommend reading books from the recommending summer reading list (if your school, doesn't have one, look at another school's.  Most of them have many of the same books), law review and law journal articles from your school, and other law related stuff. 

And remember, if you do any reading or preparation at all, it will more than most of the other students.

jdohno

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2005, 10:12:56 AM »
You are entitled to your opinion. But if more law students were aware that prepping in the summer was available or helpful then more people would do it and get higher GPAs then merely doing okay. Prepping is helpful because learning the law is about seeing the black letter law and fact patterns many many times. Estates and Future Interests was pretty manageable and a little fun in school after I struggled through it in the summer when prepping. You don't get the repeated exposure to the law in class and in school you have to do a lot of teaching yourself and studying on your own. Also you are not prepping by reading the casebooks, you are prepping using the E&Es which almost every law school students uses in school. The E&Es do a great job of explaining the law in plain language instead of the chasing the tail spin of the casebooks. By the time, my classmates discovered the E&Es, commerical outlines, etc, it was near exam time and I had been working with the books for about 5 to 7 months before them. I was worried that they had caught up but my concern was unfounded. Aside from the few people who discover the E&Es quickly and work the examples dilgently, I found most people get the study aids too late and then don't use them or use them properly.

The summer reading lists are a joke. Schools really like for you to relax and come in unprepared. They also like to give you that line that grades don't matter, etc in orientation and most times it's not until you are studying for your exams or after your grades come back that you are told that grades do matter. It help me very much knowing before I started school that first year grades determine the type of opportunities that you will have and that grades are largely based on exams.

You're right prepping is more than what the other law students will do. And that's the great thing about it. While my classmates were struggling to get into their studying or trying to figure out what was going on, I adjusted well to school. I already had a system in place from the summer. After about two weeks of minor adjustments at the beginning of the semester getting used to my professors, I was back on track. Also with the prepping, you have to realize that even though you are learning, for example, the defintion of battery one way, your professor might have a different definition. As long as you are aware that your professor's nuances are what you used on your exams and make the proper adjustments then you're fine. Also there are a few 6 week prep programs given through various law schools that aren't probably really that helpful since they tend to be for borderline candidates. But the fact that they exist suggests that some law schools believe that you can prepare for law school. It depends on your goals. I had to do extremely well this year because I wanted to transfer from my school even before I started. I wanted to do something that would increase the odds in my favor. PLS2 gave me a great starting point and I worked extremely hard and I achieved a great deal.
dude, relax.
Planet Law School is a good book, and a good counterpart to Law School Confidential.
But all that stuff you are doing before you begin classes won't help a lot.  Almost no one takes prep courses before starting, and yet we've done okay.
No matter how prepared you are or think you are when you begin in August, the other students will catch up to you soon enough. 
It's good to some reading about law over the summer, but I don't think any of us would recommend reading casebooks or assignments.

I recommend reading books from the recommending summer reading list (if your school, doesn't have one, look at another school's.  Most of them have many of the same books), law review and law journal articles from your school, and other law related stuff. 

And remember, if you do any reading or preparation at all, it will more than most of the other students.

Brooklaw

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2005, 10:57:45 AM »
I'm already well into the E&E series books on Contract, Property, Civ Pro, etc. I am so glad that i followed PLS2 advice. I think that if i do this the right way over the summer, i will have less stress during my first semester. I don't expect to know everything just from summer prep, but i won't be bombarded with everything at once when i start school. To the OP, i say go for it. I've already done two of the briefs from Delaney's Legal Reasoning book, and i can already see where i've gone wrong, which will help me know the right way to do it.

Good luck

Mary

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2005, 11:08:01 AM »
For some reason, I think you are the author (atticus falcon) going under this alias.


You are entitled to your opinion. But if more law students were aware that prepping in the summer was available or helpful then more people would do it and get higher GPAs then merely doing okay. Prepping is helpful because learning the law is about seeing the black letter law and fact patterns many many times. Estates and Future Interests was pretty manageable and a little fun in school after I struggled through it in the summer when prepping. You don't get the repeated exposure to the law in class and in school you have to do a lot of teaching yourself and studying on your own. Also you are not prepping by reading the casebooks, you are prepping using the E&Es which almost every law school students uses in school. The E&Es do a great job of explaining the law in plain language instead of the chasing the tail spin of the casebooks. By the time, my classmates discovered the E&Es, commerical outlines, etc, it was near exam time and I had been working with the books for about 5 to 7 months before them. I was worried that they had caught up but my concern was unfounded. Aside from the few people who discover the E&Es quickly and work the examples dilgently, I found most people get the study aids too late and then don't use them or use them properly.

The summer reading lists are a joke. Schools really like for you to relax and come in unprepared. They also like to give you that line that grades don't matter, etc in orientation and most times it's not until you are studying for your exams or after your grades come back that you are told that grades do matter. It help me very much knowing before I started school that first year grades determine the type of opportunities that you will have and that grades are largely based on exams.

You're right prepping is more than what the other law students will do. And that's the great thing about it. While my classmates were struggling to get into their studying or trying to figure out what was going on, I adjusted well to school. I already had a system in place from the summer. After about two weeks of minor adjustments at the beginning of the semester getting used to my professors, I was back on track. Also with the prepping, you have to realize that even though you are learning, for example, the defintion of battery one way, your professor might have a different definition. As long as you are aware that your professor's nuances are what you used on your exams and make the proper adjustments then you're fine. Also there are a few 6 week prep programs given through various law schools that aren't probably really that helpful since they tend to be for borderline candidates. But the fact that they exist suggests that some law schools believe that you can prepare for law school. It depends on your goals. I had to do extremely well this year because I wanted to transfer from my school even before I started. I wanted to do something that would increase the odds in my favor. PLS2 gave me a great starting point and I worked extremely hard and I achieved a great deal.
dude, relax.
Planet Law School is a good book, and a good counterpart to Law School Confidential.
But all that stuff you are doing before you begin classes won't help a lot.  Almost no one takes prep courses before starting, and yet we've done okay.
No matter how prepared you are or think you are when you begin in August, the other students will catch up to you soon enough. 
It's good to some reading about law over the summer, but I don't think any of us would recommend reading casebooks or assignments.

I recommend reading books from the recommending summer reading list (if your school, doesn't have one, look at another school's.  Most of them have many of the same books), law review and law journal articles from your school, and other law related stuff. 

And remember, if you do any reading or preparation at all, it will more than most of the other students.

lincolnsgrandson

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2005, 11:27:30 AM »
Of course commercial outlines and Examples and Explanations are necessary tools for law school.  But I don't think it's such a hot idea to read them over the summer.  Prep courses might have helped you.  I'm willing to bet that there's no correlation to prep courses and year end grades. 
I just recommended reading general books about law, like Gideon's Trumpet or A Civil Action, if you're going to read anything in the summer at all.  Most students, of course, enter law school as cold as glaciers.

And trying to understand stuff like future interests over the summer can be disastrous. It will frustrate most students.  You have to wait until you know about your professor, or else you won't know what to concentrate on.  For instance, I could tell that my property professor was not going to emphasize future interests or rule against perpetuities on the test.  I knew that eminent domain, however, was crucial.  So I just kept a chart of future interests with me to the exam, instead of killing my brain trying to understand it.

I cannot speak to the merits of summer prep courses, because I don't know any student who did it.  What was it like?


jdohno

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2005, 11:29:34 AM »
No way. Besides I'm a female. I don't like everything in PLS. Believe me. But it was a great starting point for resources. I don't think I did well this year without being exposed to a lot of those books. If people want to do well in school then I'm going to discuss what helped me. I'm also a fan of Leews and the two Delaney books. I just feel very lucky that I found a lot of these things before school started. Not everyone wants to be at the top of their class in school. Some people have other obligations. But I really wanted to transfer from my school and I knew I had to do well so I'm extremely grateful that I have the chance to. Since you're not in law school yet, maybe you will find another method. I have met a few people who are just naturals when it comes to the law. Personally, I don't care what people do to prepare for law school. But I always tell people not to go in blind and to do something in the summer. Also I don't think people should be criticized for reading PLS2, Getting to Maybe or Law School Confidental before they go to law school.

For some reason, I think you are the author (atticus falcon) going under this alias.



jdohno

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2005, 11:38:52 AM »
Well I agree with you on the prep courses correlation. But I didn't do prep courses. I did prepping through the E&Es. It was hard to do them in the summer but extremely helpful when school started. I agree with you about A Civil Action and similar books. I also agree with you that too many people enter law school cold.

EFI over the summer wasn't bad. If I had your professor, I would have just made an adjustment. Just because your professor doesn't emphasize EFI doesn't mean you don't have to know it. The state I plan to take the Bar in has a few killer EFI questions I am told. So there's no harm in knowing EFI. I wish I could have bought notes into my exams. My professors didn't allow anything in. I know someone who had open book exams in her first year.  >:(

I don't know about summer courses. But prepping in the summer was hard. But like I said it helped me eased into school pretty well. It depends on the person. I didn't come to law school from college so I hadn't been in an academic environment for a couple of years. So prepping helped put me back in academic mode. I'm just glad this year is over. So many 3Ls have told me that second year is much better.


Of course commercial outlines and Examples and Explanations are necessary tools for law school.  But I don't think it's such a hot idea to read them over the summer.  Prep courses might have helped you.  I'm willing to bet that there's no correlation to prep courses and year end grades. 
I just recommended reading general books about law, like Gideon's Trumpet or A Civil Action, if you're going to read anything in the summer at all.  Most students, of course, enter law school as cold as glaciers.

And trying to understand stuff like future interests over the summer can be disastrous. It will frustrate most students.  You have to wait until you know about your professor, or else you won't know what to concentrate on.  For instance, I could tell that my property professor was not going to emphasize future interests or rule against perpetuities on the test.  I knew that eminent domain, however, was crucial.  So I just kept a chart of future interests with me to the exam, instead of killing my brain trying to understand it.

I cannot speak to the merits of summer prep courses, because I don't know any student who did it.  What was it like?



lincolnsgrandson

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Re: Planet Law School II Preparation Schedule
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2005, 11:54:00 AM »
I agree that no one should be criticized for any reading or preparation they do over the summer.  But I do recommend keeping it on the downlow.

Prepping might also help a student get bad habits out of the way early on, like briefing cases.  Everyone eventually stops briefing cases, that's why it helps to break the habit before the real stuff begin.  I used that first week in law school - what do they call it, legal process? - to do everything the law school way. Then I was able to ditch it quickly with my real assigments. 

Let me make one suggestion about Law Student Confidential - don't do the multiple highlighter thing.  It's too much frustration, and all you get it out of it is an eight pound coloring book.  It was a good idea for the pre-laptop era.  In this century, you should be taking notes on your laptop.