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Author Topic: Psychopath attorneys  (Read 28260 times)

blackjesus

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #60 on: July 13, 2006, 05:52:09 PM »
Pretty much anywhere there's a law school!

i

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #61 on: August 14, 2006, 06:16:48 PM »


Regarding attorneys with NES, it is generally the associates who have come from the very best American law schools and have had a historical pattern of academic achievement that is nothing short of extraordinary. As I am sure you can understand from the above discussion, NES is something that can actually create the sort of superachiever who shows up to work at a major law firm. In a scholastic environment-where the attorney has the luxury of choosing most of his/her courses, can work hard and get immediate feedback via grades and in conditions where the intelligence of the attorney with NES is such that he/she can perform at such a high academic level-he/she is likely to thrive. Moreover, a goal of attending law school and becoming a powerful lawyer fits in perfectly with the fantasies of the attorney with NES.

It is very easy for me to detect NES when speaking with young attorneys. An attorney with NES generally believes that he/she should be given the type of work that he/she wants. These attorneys also tend to believe that they are extremely intelligent and valuable to their employers. In addition, these sorts of attorneys tend to be very calculating and analyze most situations vis-a-vis whether or not they are getting the upper hand. If they are criticized by their employers, they may simply leave.

As a recruiter, I can tell you that I see this happening all the time. Because our firm solicits telephone calls and interest from the highest-caliber attorneys on a daily basis, the NES attorney is one of the sorts of attorneys we often speak with most frequently. The following similarities generally define the attorneys with NES I speak with:

-They generally have not worked at a "real job" before starting as a first-year associate inside a law firm;
- They generally did exceptionally well in college and attended a top-10 law school (NES, in fact, appears to be more likely the better the law school the person attended);
- They generally come from a sheltered upper-middle-class background, or their parents were academics; and,
- They generally believe they are smarter than the people they are working with.

In essence, the attorney with NES would likely never make it into a prestigious law firm had he/she not been sheltered by school, parents, and others for so long. The artificial academic environment; the home environment of privilege; the positive feedback from academic institutions, where social dynamics are not as emphasized as academic might; and the lack of prior work experience all serve to isolate the NES attorneys and allow their conditions to grow in the absence of a "real" environment. While I would be the first to argue that a law firm is not necessarily a "real" environment, it is much more so the real world than school or an upper-middle-class upbringing is.


I don't think this is a real disease in the way the guy of the article tries to present it ..

or honor

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #62 on: September 04, 2006, 07:21:42 PM »
The typical law student and lawyer is hypomaniac: someome with an elevated mood, irritable, his thoughts racing, a tendency towards people-seeking, hypersexuality, grandiose thinking, religiosity, and pressured speech. Hypomania is a less severe form of mania without progression to psychosis. Many of the symptoms of mania are present, but to a lesser degree than in overt mania. People with hypomania are generally perceived as being energetic, euphoric, overflowing with new ideas, and sometimes highly confident and charismatic, and unlike full-blown mania, they are sufficiently capable of coherent thought and action to participate in everyday life.

Although hypomania sounds in many ways like a desirable condition, it can have significant downsides. Many of the negative symptoms of mania can be present; the primary differentiating factor is the absence of psychosis. Many hypomanic patients have symptoms of disrupted sleep patterns, irritability, racing thoughts, obsessional traits, and poor judgment. Hypomania, like mania, can be associated with recklessness, excessive spending, risky hypersexual activity, general lack of judgment and out-of-character behaviour that the patient may later regret and may cause significant social, interpersonal, career and financial problems.
If someone could figure out a way to sell placebos for profit, they'd make a lot of money. Why, GNC already does it!

morpheme

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #63 on: September 12, 2006, 11:15:54 PM »

The typical law student and lawyer is hypomaniac: someome with an elevated mood, irritable, his thoughts racing, a tendency towards people-seeking, hypersexuality, grandiose thinking, religiosity, and pressured speech. Hypomania is a less severe form of mania without progression to psychosis. Many of the symptoms of mania are present, but to a lesser degree than in overt mania. People with hypomania are generally perceived as being energetic, euphoric, overflowing with new ideas, and sometimes highly confident and charismatic, and unlike full-blown mania, they are sufficiently capable of coherent thought and action to participate in everyday life.

Although hypomania sounds in many ways like a desirable condition, it can have significant downsides. Many of the negative symptoms of mania can be present; the primary differentiating factor is the absence of psychosis. Many hypomanic patients have symptoms of disrupted sleep patterns, irritability, racing thoughts, obsessional traits, and poor judgment. Hypomania, like mania, can be associated with recklessness, excessive spending, risky hypersexual activity, general lack of judgment and out-of-character behaviour that the patient may later regret and may cause significant social, interpersonal, career and financial problems.


Sounds like someone on coke!

einszweidrei

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #64 on: September 14, 2006, 07:08:40 AM »

Eraprick?! How about eradick? Or or erapig?


benet

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #65 on: September 30, 2006, 09:20:23 AM »
The typical lawyer is an adult whose overriding desire is to belong to a higher -- or at least, richer -- social class. We are subtly introduced to the two over-riding themes of the antisocial personality disorder (still labeled by many professional authorities "psychopathy" and "sociopathy"): an overwhelming dysphoria and an even more overweening drive to assuage this angst by belonging. The psychopath is an unhappy person. He is besieged by recurrent depression bouts, hypochondria and an overpowering sense of alienation and drift. He is bored with his own life and is permeated by a seething and explosive envy of the lucky, the mighty, the clever, the have it alls, the know it alls, the handsome, the happy - in short: his opposites. He feels discriminated against and dealt a poor hand in the great poker game called life. He is driven obsessively to right these perceived wrongs and feels entirely justified in adopting whatever means he deems necessary in pursuing this goal.
"The rich," noted F. Scott Fitzgerald, "are different from you and me." "Yes," replied Ernest Hemingway, "they have money."

citgo

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #66 on: October 03, 2006, 05:22:54 AM »
Wow, benet, couln't have said it better!!!

ruegd

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #67 on: March 12, 2007, 04:37:35 PM »
The typical attorney doesn't fit any of our ruffian archetypes: the L.A. gang member, the Mafia hit man, the young street punk. He's now at an age when many people are described as fatherly/motherly. He is given to impulsivity and spectacular failure, irresponsible sexuality, employment and parenting, dramatic superficial displays, and a natural proclivity to bend the rules. There's usually a natural connection that binds son to parent which is easily exploited by the psychopath. The psychopathic attorney, with a brazen ability to con and manipulate, evades the legal radar screen.

lawschoolaw

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #68 on: March 21, 2007, 07:37:20 PM »

The typical attorney doesn't fit any of our ruffian archetypes: the L.A. gang member, the Mafia hit man, the young street punk. He's now at an age when many people are described as fatherly/motherly. He is given to impulsivity and spectacular failure, irresponsible sexuality, employment and parenting, dramatic superficial displays, and a natural proclivity to bend the rules. There's usually a natural connection that binds son to parent which is easily exploited by the psychopath. The psychopathic attorney, with a brazen ability to con and manipulate, evades the legal radar screen.


Couldn't agree more, ruegd!

my stepson my lover

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Re: Psychopath attorneys
« Reply #69 on: May 31, 2007, 07:00:54 AM »

The typical attorney doesn't fit any of our ruffian archetypes: the L.A. gang member, the Mafia hit man, the young street punk. He's now at an age when many people are described as fatherly/motherly. He is given to impulsivity and spectacular failure, irresponsible sexuality, employment and parenting, dramatic superficial displays, and a natural proclivity to bend the rules. There's usually a natural connection that binds son to parent which is easily exploited by the psychopath. The psychopathic attorney, with a brazen ability to con and manipulate, evades the legal radar screen.


Watch "A little thing called murder" for the same traits of a woman who infected her son.