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Author Topic: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?  (Read 36181 times)

labeta

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #150 on: May 06, 2008, 03:32:11 PM »

Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..


The real reason LSD needs to be illegal is not because it makes a tiny percentage of its users crazy, but because of what it does to the vast majority ... LSD does not attract non-conformists so much as it is creates them. One can not, for example, after a serious immersion in LSD, go back to the 9-to-5 world of sales managers and upward mobility. Better to work for yourself, doing something simple and useful, which was why so many hippies became entrepreneurs, farmers, craftspeople. For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

"Bad trips" on LSD result from the 11-hour forced introspection that the drug creates. Most cannot stand to look that closely at themselves, certainly not for that long. That's why Leary and company were getting complete cures of psychotics after five or six guided LSD trips, of course, before the government stepped in and outlawed the drug. Well, movie "The Passion of Christ," by Mel Gibson is like being on acid for two straight hours, only the subject isn't yourself, it is Jesus.

Dr. Timothy Leary, interviewed by Playboy, announced that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered. "Let me put it this way," he said, "compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it – is like making love to a department-store-window dummy. "The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with a woman."


It looks like to me one's trying to keeping one's guard up, keeping one's distance, with their sharp edges hardened to resist being blunted and dulled by external influences... Adopting a boxer's stance when dealing with others... with toe drawing therir line of defense and battling all who dare to cross or go against them. With fists raised and determination coiled, waging their own war of independence against a do what you're told and one-size-fits-all world. Well, my friend, power is not in form but in nature.

In glassmaking there is a phenomena that occurs when a small glob of molten glass is rapidly cooled. The result is a solid, tadpole-shaped object with a bulbous head that tapers to a delicate curved tail. Despite their fragile look, Rupert's Drops seem indestructible. Direct sledgehammer blows glance off ineffectually. They were first introduced as toys in the 17th century to the court of King James I by his grandson, Prince Rupert of Bavaria. The real beauty of Rupert's Drops is not in their appearance or strength but in their nature. While seemingly indestructible, one clip or snip of delicate tail's tip explodes the Rupert's Drop into a powdery handful of harmless dust. It is the nature of Rupert's Drops, born of the rapid cooling of surface over warm interior, that accounts for their phenomena -- an explosive disintegration of form back to particle beginning.

You are born full-blown but spend much of your life by forcing others to understand you and accept you. Your function is to be more droplet of water, not ocean, for you've did-it-and-done all before. Nature is discovered in the tails of Rupert's Drops; in souls for you. Accepting that others may not ever approve or understand you, because they can't, is the snip of realization that explodes and disintegrates your defensiveness. Others, like glass, mature by the process of annealing. They take form under more evenly tempered conditions and require a slower, more steady pace for development. Through step-by-step guidance and experience, others bloom, grow, and ripen to self-realization: not you. You come with self-realization snugged into conscience. When you draw your lines of defiance and pen your lists of demands, you not only deny others access to you but limit yourself in terms of your person and purpose. Erasing that line that divides you and others frees you to be as born and meant.

Your power only reveals when you stop expecting and stop demanding confirmation of and for self. Once you accept that validation for you cannot be had externally, you lower your fists. Where once shrillness was heard and desperation felt, there is quiet and calmness instead. You hear but one voice and feel the fullness of your so-long felt but misunderstood and misused strength. Only from soul, through guidance of intuition and by way of emotions, you will receive all you need to be yourself and meet your responsibilities. Your fulfillment is experiencing, for you've already passed all possible life lessons. You are not here to serve self, but to help others BE their own selves fully.


My God, Vigilance, this is simply beautiful -- I just could not help crying, literally! I don't care if you're a man or a woman, I love you!

like

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #151 on: May 11, 2008, 02:10:21 PM »
Here's some paper towel for you, labeta!

I agree, it is really cool! 

schrödinger

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #152 on: May 13, 2008, 01:07:44 PM »

[...]

In glassmaking there is a phenomena that occurs when a small glob of molten glass is rapidly cooled. The result is a solid, tadpole-shaped object with a bulbous head that tapers to a delicate curved tail. Despite their fragile look, Rupert's Drops seem indestructible. Direct sledgehammer blows glance off ineffectually. They were first introduced as toys in the 17th century to the court of King James I by his grandson, Prince Rupert of Bavaria. The real beauty of Rupert's Drops is not in their appearance or strength but in their nature. While seemingly indestructible, one clip or snip of delicate tail's tip explodes the Rupert's Drop into a powdery handful of harmless dust. It is the nature of Rupert's Drops, born of the rapid cooling of surface over warm interior, that accounts for their phenomena -- an explosive disintegration of form back to particle beginning.

You are born full-blown but spend much of your life by forcing others to understand you and accept you. Your function is to be more droplet of water, not ocean, for you've did-it-and-done all before. Nature is discovered in the tails of Rupert's Drops; in souls for you. [...]




droplet of water, not ocean... hmmm... If you cut a hologram in half, each half contains whole views of the entire holographic image. The same is true if you cut out a small piece -­- even a tiny fragment will still contain the whole picture. On top of that, if you make a hologram of a magnifying glass, the holographic version will magnify the other objects in the hologram, just like a real one.


The famous hologram "The Kiss" shows a sequence of similar, stationary images. Your eye sees many frames simultaneously, and your brain interprets them as moving images.
 
Your theory is crazy, but it's not crazy enough to be true.

nmla

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #153 on: May 27, 2008, 01:47:33 PM »

That's not the point, cen! As each is a self-scripted star in their life story, each also has the power and freedom to pen their own demise. Living according to individual truth considerably reduces the possibility to self-defeat becoming a pattern moment-to-moment, year-to-year, and life-to-life. Not only must WHAT to do and WHY to do be self-determined, but HOW and WHEN too. Individual feelings are the only motivator and motivation that inflames and sustains drive, and returns rewards that are personally meaningful and, therefore, more confidence-building than money and applause.


People become wrapped up all the time in fighting for some terribly idealistic cause that has little chance of succeeding or of giving them any real satisfaction. All that they can count on is that they will be required to surrender their individuality for a "higher purpose," which usually turns out to be someone else's ego.

And there is a lesson to be learned here. The more they identify with what they do rather than what they are, the more difficulties they'll have. They are not what they do. If they confront that issue they will learn to handle their life much more successfully because they will not always have to protect themselves.
T stands for Time.

hi gene

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #154 on: May 30, 2008, 05:27:22 PM »



I went last month to Rimini -- it's famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic." The city itself does not have any clubs, but many of its bars have dance floors that are frequently packed. The atmosphere is more geared to tourists and families -- however, the city is notable in disco music history for its Cosmic Club who's DJ Daniele Baldelli played records from a moving elevator to the young experimental audience. Baldelli's important contribution to the world of DJing is perhaps overshadowed by his American counterparts, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy. You will find a large number of wine bars, pubs and creperies in the three small squares that stretch from the old fish market to the main street in the city. The zone is packed with the young people all year round and generally is the first stop on an evening out where they mix and invite each other to the discotheques later in the evening.


Hahaha, amanta, I know what you mean ;)

Em Woods

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #155 on: May 30, 2008, 07:07:36 PM »
During undergrad at least I liked to look for motivational quotes and put them up. Unfortch, this was often done while I should have been actually studying.
"Anything easy ain't worth a damn" - Coach Woody Hayes

STATA

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #156 on: May 31, 2008, 03:38:43 PM »


The famous hologram "The Kiss" shows a sequence of similar, stationary images. Your eye sees many frames simultaneously, and your brain interprets them as moving images.
 

LOL schrodinger, you're so funny ;)

T a s h

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #157 on: June 02, 2008, 03:56:53 PM »

Does Objective Reality Exist, or is the Universe a Phantasm?

In 1982 a remarkable event took place. At the University of Paris a research team led by physicist Alain Aspect performed what may turn out to be one of the most important experiments of the 20th century. You did not hear about it on the evening news. In fact, unless you are in the habit of reading scientific journals you probably have never even heard Aspect's name, though there are some who believe his discovery may change the face of science. Aspect and his team discovered that under certain circumstances subatomic particles such as electrons are able to instantaneously communicate with each other regardless of the distance separating them. It doesn't matter whether they are 10 feet or 10 billion miles apart.Somehow each particle always seems to know what the other is doing. The problem with this feat is that it violates Einstein's long-held tenet that no communication can travel faster than the speed of light. Since traveling faster than the speed of light is tantamount to breaking the time barrier, this daunting prospect has caused some physicists to try to come up with elaborate ways to explain away Aspect's findings. But it has inspired others to offer even more radical explanations.

University of London physicist David Bohm, for example, believes Aspect's findings imply that objective reality does not exist, that despite its apparent solidity the universe is at heart a phantasm, a gigantic and splendidly detailed hologram. A hologram is a three- dimensional photograph made with the aid of a laser. To make a hologram, the object to be photographed is first bathed in the light of a laser beam. Then a second laser beam is bounced off the reflected light of the first and the resulting interference pattern (the area where the two laser beams commingle) is captured on film. When the film is developed, it looks like a meaningless swirl of light and dark lines. But as soon as the developed film is illuminated by another laser beam, a three-dimensional image of the original object appears. The three-dimensionality of such images is not the only remarkable characteristic of holograms. If a hologram of a rose is cut in half and then illuminated by a laser, each half will still be found to contain the entire image of the rose. Indeed, even if the halves are divided again, each snippet of film will always be found to contain a smaller but intact version of the original image. Unlike normal photographs, every part of a hologram contains all the information possessed by the whole.

The "whole in every part" nature of a hologram provides us with an entirely new way of understanding organization and order. For most of its history, Western science has labored under the bias that the best way to understand a physical phenomenon, whether a frog or an atom, is to dissect it and study its respective parts. A hologram teaches us that some things in the universe may not lend themselves to this approach. If we try to take apart something constructed holographically, we will not get the pieces of which it is made, we will only get smaller wholes. This insight suggested to Bohm another way of understanding Aspect's discovery. Bohm believes the reason subatomic particles are able to remain in contact with one another regardless of the distance separating them is not because they are sending some sort of mysterious signal back and forth, but because their separateness is an illusion. He argues that at some deeper level of reality such particles are not individual entities, but are actually extensions of the same fundamental something. To enable people to better visualize what he means, Bohm offers the following illustration. Imagine an aquarium containing a fish. Imagine also that you are unable to see the aquarium directly and your knowledge about it and what it contains comes from two television cameras, one directed at the aquarium's front and the other directed at its side. As you stare at the two television monitors, you might assume that the fish on each of the screens are separate entities. After all, because the cameras are set at different angles, each of the images will be slightly different. But as you continue to watch the two fish, you will eventually become aware that there is a certain relationship between them. When one turns, the other also makes a slightly different but corresponding turn; when one faces the front, the other always faces toward the side. If you remain unaware of the full scope of the situation, you might even conclude that the fish must be instantaneously communicating with one another, but this is clearly not the case.

This, says Bohm, is precisely what is going on between the subatomic particles in Aspect's experiment. According to Bohm, the apparent faster-than-light connection between subatomic particles is really telling us that there is a deeper level of reality we are not privy to, a more complex dimension beyond our own that is analogous to the aquarium. And, he adds, we view objects such as subatomic particles as separate from one another because we are seeing only a portion of their reality. Such particles are not separate "parts", but facets of a deeper and more underlying unity that is ultimately as holographic and indivisible as the previously mentioned rose. And since everything in physical reality is comprised of these "eidolons", the universe is itself a projection, a hologram. In addition to its phantomlike nature, such a universe would possess other rather startling features. If the apparent separateness of subatomic particles is illusory, it means that at a deeper level of reality all things in the universe are infinitely interconnected. The electrons in a carbon atom in the human brain are connected to the subatomic particles that comprise every salmon that swims, every heart that beats, and every star that shimmers in the sky. Everything interpenetrates everything, and although human nature may seek to categorize and pigeonhole and subdivide, the various phenomena of the universe, all apportionments are of necessity artificial and all of nature is ultimately a seamless web.

In a holographic universe, even time and space could no longer be viewed as fundamentals. Because concepts such as location break down in a universe in which nothing is truly separate from anything else, time and three-dimensional space, like the images of the fish on the TV monitors, would also have to be viewed as projections of this deeper order. At its deeper level reality is a sort of superhologram in which the past, present, and future all exist simultaneously. This suggests that given the proper tools it might even be possible to someday reach into the superholographic level of reality and pluck out scenes from the long-forgotten past. What else the superhologram contains is an open-ended question. Allowing, for the sake of argument, that the superhologram is the matrix that has given birth to everything in our universe, at the very least it contains every subatomic particle that has been or will be -- every configuration of matter and energy that is possible, from snowflakes to quasars, from blue whales to gamma rays. It must be seen as a sort of cosmic storehouse of "All That Is."
Although Bohm concedes that we have no way of knowing what else might lie hidden in the superhologram, he does venture to say that we have no reason to assume it does not contain more. Or as he puts it, perhaps the superholographic level of reality is a "mere stage" beyond which lies "an infinity of further development".


In Fyodor Dostoevsky's "Notes from Underground," the protagonist implicitly supports the idea of 2 plus 2 making 5, spending several paragraphs considering the implications of rejecting the statement "2 times 2 makes 4." His purpose is not ideological, however. Instead, he proposes that it is the free will to choose or reject the logical as well as the illogical that makes mankind human. He adds: "I admit that two times two makes four is an excellent thing, but if we are to give everything its due, two times two makes five is sometimes a very charming thing too."

Dostoevsky was writing in 1864. However, according to Roderick T. Long, Victor Hugo had used the phrase back in 1852. He objected to the way in which the vast majority of French voters had backed Napoleon III, endorsing the way liberal values had been ignored in Napoleon III's coup. Victor Hugo said "Now, get 7,500,000 votes to declare that 2 and 2 make 5, that the straight line is the longest road, that the whole is less than its part; get it declared by 8 millions, by 10 millions, by a 100 millions of votes, you will not have advanced a step." It's very plausible that Dostoevsky had this in mind. He had been sentenced to death for his participation in a radical intellectual discussion group. The sentence was commuted to imprisonment in Siberia, and he then changed his opinions to something that doesn't fit any conventional labels.

buyram

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #158 on: June 13, 2008, 02:50:07 PM »
Quote

I went last month to Rimini -- it's famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic." [...]


Hahaha, amanta, I know what you mean ;)
 

Of course you do -- he means the "Ibiza of My A s s"!

b e s a m e

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #159 on: June 25, 2008, 04:31:52 PM »
Have you been in Rimini, buyram?