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Author Topic: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?  (Read 35172 times)

NoelleMyBelle

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #30 on: May 17, 2005, 01:05:47 PM »
Nope. :)

SavoyTruffle

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #31 on: May 17, 2005, 04:46:16 PM »
Nope. :)

Too bad, a glass of wine a day is good for you.  Far healthier than a lot of the additives in your food, anyway.

NoelleMyBelle

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #32 on: May 18, 2005, 06:48:15 PM »
Alcohol is also expensive and high in calories. And wine tastes bad.

rezipsa

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #33 on: May 18, 2005, 07:34:13 PM »
Alcohol is also expensive and high in calories. And wine tastes bad.
Expensive...Alcohol is worth it. 
High in calories...that's why we work out.
Wine taste...that's why I drink TnTs or raz. vodka and tonic.

Anyone need a drink?

rezipsa

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #34 on: May 19, 2005, 12:56:16 PM »
And wine tastes bad.

Either you've destroyed your palate with cheap beer and bad mixed drinks, or you've never tried a decent glass of wine.  Yes, you do need to develop a taste for it, but that's true for almost all alcohol.
Don't get me wrong, I'll drink a nice glass of wine with dinner, relaxing or trying to read cases.  But I prefer mixed drinks.

NoelleMyBelle

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #35 on: May 20, 2005, 12:04:45 PM »
I don't like anything that I have to "develop a taste for"--there are enough things to spend money on and add calories to my diet that  I like naturally (like chocolate!!).  Why add more?

Coffee, wine, caviar...blech. Developing a taste is a waste of time.  :)

Danielle

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #36 on: May 22, 2005, 11:34:07 PM »
Yes, wine has real snob appeal for those who do develop their palate and knowledge of wine tasting.  Right, Jacy?

maney

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The Legal Profession's Hidden Secret: Substance Abuse
« Reply #37 on: June 23, 2005, 09:34:37 PM »
Some people do drugs, which is the stupidest thing one can do.

People go to law school believing that they are there for the sole purpose of learning the skills necessary to become lawyers. In addition to this obvious agenda, law students are also exposed to a hidden agenda; to start the process of becoming acculturated to the norms and standards of the legal profession. This legal culture, which law students hope to join, will make rigorous demands upon them. They will be required to use analytical skills in disregard to their emotional reactions, advocate positions that may clash with personal beliefs, and place client’s interests above societal interests. Some lawyers will pay a personal price in emotional terms for engaging in this difficult and complex role of being a lawyer. Law students need to be exposed to and better understand not only the professional pressures they will face after graduation, but also how these pressures can impact their personal lives. One such potential pressure that places law students at great future risk is alcohol or drug abuse.

If the only concern in understanding drug and alcohol abuse among lawyers was the destructive impact on their personal welfare, the issue would be one of great importance. However, the concern becomes even more significant when it is acknowledged that for every lawyer who struggles with addiction issues, the interests of many clients who have reposed trust in their lawyer are endangered. Research clearly establishes that lawyers are at greater risk for alcohol and drug problems than the general population. "Few professions and academic pursuits are as demanding and stressful as the practice of law or studying to become a lawyer."

Research further demonstrates that law students tend to increase their use of alcohol and drugs during their law school careers. Law schools cannot ignore the realities of this research. Law students and lawyers need to receive further education and information about the problem and consequences of alcohol and drug abuse. The lack of interest by legal educators and among members of the Bar may be a factor as to why it has been estimated that a high percentage of disciplined lawyers suffer from addiction issues. From time to time, a brave lawyer will come forward and write about how drug and alcohol abuse negatively impacted her or his personal and professional life.5 Since lawyers are generally concerned about their reputation, some lawyers will only disclose this type of personal account anonymously. The value of storytelling is that the reader can learn through the personal struggles of another lawyer that a better life can exist if the addicted lawyer seeks help. The Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program of the State Bar of Michigan offers assistance and encouragement to lawyers who suffer from chemical dependency problems. Recent statistics indicate that the number of lawyers seeking such help has dramatically increased.

With support from the Oakland County Bar Foundation, I have produced a 33-minute video documentary to help raise the level of awareness regarding chemical addiction among law students and lawyers. It is my intention to provide every accredited law school in the United States with a copy of this program so that it can be aired and discussed in a Professional Responsibility course. Legal educators owe law students the obligation of providing useful information about drug and alcohol abuse. This video program opens and closes with people who have expertise in the area of chemical dependency within the legal profession. John Berry, Executive Director of the State Bar of Michigan, who also chairs the Professionalism Committee of the American Bar Association, conveys the damage that an addicted lawyer can cause to the lawyer’s own life as well as the lives of clients. Robert Edick, Deputy Grievance Administrator, Michigan Attorney Grievance Commission, speaks to how the disciplinary system can assist some addicted lawyers in seeking treatment rather than suffering the normal consequences of discipline. Psychologist Bill Livingston, Director of the Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program, discusses the unique problems faced by lawyers that causes the high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse among lawyers.

The most compelling portion of the video consists of conversations with four Michigan lawyers who are successfully recovering from drug and alcohol addictions. Each lawyer has a unique and personal story to tell.

Steve, in his early 50s, was suspended for three years from the practice of law for misusing client trust funds. His real problem was severe drug and alcohol addiction. Approaching death and having lost everything that meant anything to him in his life, including his family, law license, and assets, Steve sought help and has been drug free over the past decade. During that time, he has been reinstated as a lawyer and has gained the respect of lawyers and judges throughout Michigan for his zealous desire to help other lawyers who suffer from substance abuse.

Roger, in his early sixties, has been in practice for over 30 years and has never been disciplined. However, he almost died as a result of alcohol addiction that did not occur until he was almost 40 years old. He has not consumed any alcohol since he came out of a coma induced by his alcohol consumption 14 years ago.

David, in his mid-30s, currently practices law with a large corporate law firm. He is a transactional and litigation lawyer. Drunk driving charges brought him within the disciplinary system. Although he has not been disciplined, he articulates the impact that his battle against the use of drugs and alcohol has had on his personal and professional life.

Catherine, a lawyer for the past five years, had her alcohol problem accelerate while a law school student. She has been plagued by a drinking problem throughout her adult life. A grievance was filed against her when she came to court appearing to be under the influence of alcohol. She received probation and retained her right to practice law upon her willingness to submit to various conditions including constant drug testing. She has been successful in her recovery and her life has dramatically improved.

One can only have great respect and admiration for the recovering lawyers who agreed to tell their stories so that law students and lawyers could become more conscious of the danger signals presented by drug and alcohol use and abuse and the help that is available to those in need. These lawyers have become positive role models for all lawyers who are willing to confront their issues with chemical dependency. Although the program is not designed to solve the problem of substance abuse among members of the legal profession, hopefully it will provide the start for a discussion about a subject that has been kept under wraps for too long.

http://www.michbar.org/journal/pdf/pdf4article745.pdf

Mary

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Re: The Legal Profession's Hidden Secret: Substance Abuse
« Reply #38 on: June 24, 2005, 07:13:52 PM »
Uh, ok. :-\

Some people do drugs, which is the stupidest thing one can do.

People go to law school believing that they are there for the sole purpose of learning the skills necessary to become lawyers. In addition to this obvious agenda, law students are also exposed to a hidden agenda; to start the process of becoming acculturated to the norms and standards of the legal profession. This legal culture, which law students hope to join, will make rigorous demands upon them. They will be required to use analytical skills in disregard to their emotional reactions, advocate positions that may clash with personal beliefs, and place client’s interests above societal interests. Some lawyers will pay a personal price in emotional terms for engaging in this difficult and complex role of being a lawyer. Law students need to be exposed to and better understand not only the professional pressures they will face after graduation, but also how these pressures can impact their personal lives. One such potential pressure that places law students at great future risk is alcohol or drug abuse.

If the only concern in understanding drug and alcohol abuse among lawyers was the destructive impact on their personal welfare, the issue would be one of great importance. However, the concern becomes even more significant when it is acknowledged that for every lawyer who struggles with addiction issues, the interests of many clients who have reposed trust in their lawyer are endangered. Research clearly establishes that lawyers are at greater risk for alcohol and drug problems than the general population. "Few professions and academic pursuits are as demanding and stressful as the practice of law or studying to become a lawyer."

Research further demonstrates that law students tend to increase their use of alcohol and drugs during their law school careers. Law schools cannot ignore the realities of this research. Law students and lawyers need to receive further education and information about the problem and consequences of alcohol and drug abuse. The lack of interest by legal educators and among members of the Bar may be a factor as to why it has been estimated that a high percentage of disciplined lawyers suffer from addiction issues. From time to time, a brave lawyer will come forward and write about how drug and alcohol abuse negatively impacted her or his personal and professional life.5 Since lawyers are generally concerned about their reputation, some lawyers will only disclose this type of personal account anonymously. The value of storytelling is that the reader can learn through the personal struggles of another lawyer that a better life can exist if the addicted lawyer seeks help. The Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program of the State Bar of Michigan offers assistance and encouragement to lawyers who suffer from chemical dependency problems. Recent statistics indicate that the number of lawyers seeking such help has dramatically increased.

With support from the Oakland County Bar Foundation, I have produced a 33-minute video documentary to help raise the level of awareness regarding chemical addiction among law students and lawyers. It is my intention to provide every accredited law school in the United States with a copy of this program so that it can be aired and discussed in a Professional Responsibility course. Legal educators owe law students the obligation of providing useful information about drug and alcohol abuse. This video program opens and closes with people who have expertise in the area of chemical dependency within the legal profession. John Berry, Executive Director of the State Bar of Michigan, who also chairs the Professionalism Committee of the American Bar Association, conveys the damage that an addicted lawyer can cause to the lawyer’s own life as well as the lives of clients. Robert Edick, Deputy Grievance Administrator, Michigan Attorney Grievance Commission, speaks to how the disciplinary system can assist some addicted lawyers in seeking treatment rather than suffering the normal consequences of discipline. Psychologist Bill Livingston, Director of the Lawyers and Judges Assistance Program, discusses the unique problems faced by lawyers that causes the high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse among lawyers.

The most compelling portion of the video consists of conversations with four Michigan lawyers who are successfully recovering from drug and alcohol addictions. Each lawyer has a unique and personal story to tell.

Steve, in his early 50s, was suspended for three years from the practice of law for misusing client trust funds. His real problem was severe drug and alcohol addiction. Approaching death and having lost everything that meant anything to him in his life, including his family, law license, and assets, Steve sought help and has been drug free over the past decade. During that time, he has been reinstated as a lawyer and has gained the respect of lawyers and judges throughout Michigan for his zealous desire to help other lawyers who suffer from substance abuse.

Roger, in his early sixties, has been in practice for over 30 years and has never been disciplined. However, he almost died as a result of alcohol addiction that did not occur until he was almost 40 years old. He has not consumed any alcohol since he came out of a coma induced by his alcohol consumption 14 years ago.

David, in his mid-30s, currently practices law with a large corporate law firm. He is a transactional and litigation lawyer. Drunk driving charges brought him within the disciplinary system. Although he has not been disciplined, he articulates the impact that his battle against the use of drugs and alcohol has had on his personal and professional life.

Catherine, a lawyer for the past five years, had her alcohol problem accelerate while a law school student. She has been plagued by a drinking problem throughout her adult life. A grievance was filed against her when she came to court appearing to be under the influence of alcohol. She received probation and retained her right to practice law upon her willingness to submit to various conditions including constant drug testing. She has been successful in her recovery and her life has dramatically improved.

One can only have great respect and admiration for the recovering lawyers who agreed to tell their stories so that law students and lawyers could become more conscious of the danger signals presented by drug and alcohol use and abuse and the help that is available to those in need. These lawyers have become positive role models for all lawyers who are willing to confront their issues with chemical dependency. Although the program is not designed to solve the problem of substance abuse among members of the legal profession, hopefully it will provide the start for a discussion about a subject that has been kept under wraps for too long.

http://www.michbar.org/journal/pdf/pdf4article745.pdf

pro_se

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Substance Abuse Among Lawyers
« Reply #39 on: July 08, 2005, 06:25:10 AM »
Incidence: "A study sponsored by the Washington State Bar Association reported that as many as 18% of the lawyers in that state may be alcohol dependent."

"...[A]lcoholism among the male attorneys is likely to be occurring at the same rate in the two states [Washington and Arizona]."

"13% [of lawyers] said they drink 6+ alcoholic beverages a day."

"It is estimated that nationwide there are 50,000 lawyers and judges who are alcoholic."

--> Compared to the General Population:

(i) Alcohol -

"About 95 million Americans drink alcohol in one form or another. About 10-13% of the general population is alcoholic, but estimates for professionals, including lawyers, range from 30 times the average for lay people."

"Some studies...suggest the incidence of chemical dependency in legal professionals might be as much as 50% higher than for the general population."

"18% of the lawyers were problem drinkers. This percentage is almost twice the approximate 10% alcohol abuse and/or dependency prevalence rates estimated for adults in the United States."

"There are statistics estimating that 15% of all lawyers are alcoholic, compared to 10% in the general population, indicating 95,000 alcoholic lawyers."

(ii) Cocaine -

Less than 1% of attorneys have abused cocaine. The national average of cocaine abuse is 3% of the adult population. "On the other hand, 26% of our sample [all lawyers] have used cocaine at some point in their lives, compared to 12% for the general population."

c) "Addiction is a progressive disease that takes time to develop:"

"Self-concern about recent alcohol use among Arizona subjects significantly increased during the course of law school and the early career years (pre-law-8%, first year-15%, third year 24%, and alumni 26%)"

"While approximately 18% of the lawyers who practiced 2-20 years had developed problem drinking, 25% of those lawyers who practiced 20 years or more were problem drinkers."

Lawyers and Depression

"They tend to be more troubled than other professionals by severe depression and drug and alcohol abuse, studies say. 11% of lawyers polled in North Carolina in 1991 admitted they consider taking their lives once a month."

"10% of the occupations: typist (n = 112), lawyer (n = 178), and other teachers and counselors (pre-kindergarten and special education teachers, education and vocational counselors) (n = 98) meet the criteria for DIS/DSM-III major depressive disorder. These occupations have decidedly higher levels of depression than the 3%-5% found by the ECA among the general population."

"One fifth of both states' [Washington and Arizona] young lawyers developed depression levels that exceeded two standard deviations above the normal population mean."

"Compared with the 3-9% of individuals in Western industrialized countries who suffer from depression, 19% of the Washington lawyers suffered from statistically significant elevated levels of depression. Of these individuals, most were experiencing suicidal ideation."

Law Students

a) Substance Abuse:

"The Committee's survey of American law school students indicates that, within the past 30 days, 81.7% of students have used alcohol, 8.2% have used marijuana, and 8% have used some other illicit drug. Scientific research has demonstrated that the '30 day test' is a valid predictor of regular use."

"Self-concern about recent alcohol use among Arizona subjects significantly increased during the course of law school and the early career years (pre-law-8%, first year-15%, third year 24%, and alumni 26%)". 

b) Depression:

"One tenth of the pre-law students were depressed before they matriculated. As previously reported, this finding approximates the level of depression found among Western industrialized populations." "Thereafter, depression far exceeded that norm. Whereas only 3-9% of individuals in Western industrialized countries suffer from depression, by late spring of the first year of law school, 32% of the students were depressed." "The percentage increased again by late spring of the 3d year when 40% of the class reported significantly elevated depression levels. Two years after law school, 17% of the same subjects were still reporting that they were depressed. Thus, for the limited samples studied, law students and lawyers suffered from depression at a rate twice to four times what would be expected in the general population."