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Author Topic: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?  (Read 36143 times)

ismile

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #140 on: April 05, 2008, 04:04:57 PM »

Indeed Alma! LSD is very useful for mediation. [...]

[...] developed some qualities in mediation that are very useful in environmental work, such as being able to focus on the process rather than the goal.


I am assuming in these two other cases you also meant meditation rather than mediation, did you not mucho?! :)

nolover

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #141 on: April 07, 2008, 05:21:35 PM »

Ketanmine is a very promising drug for occasional use -- trippy almost like LSD, yet lasts only about 2 hours, which is good if you get a bad trip.


Interesting DunD!

o l i v e r

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #142 on: April 16, 2008, 10:41:39 AM »
.
God does not play dice with the universe.

superpartner

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #143 on: April 16, 2008, 01:03:46 PM »

A claim frequently heard about the San Pedro experience is that the user embarks on a flight of a telepathic nature being transported across time and space. A user who embarks on this "astral journey" may perceive events happening in distant parts of the world, or in metaphysical realms. This flight phenomenon, which I have not encountered in my experience with San Pedro, may result from solanaceous plants which are frequently included in the San Pedro brew and contain the Belladonna alkaloids.


Stanislav Grof feels the holographic paradigm offers a model for understanding many of the baffling phenomena experienced by individuals during altered states of consciousness. In the 1950s, while conducting research into the beliefs of LSD as a psychotherapeutic tool, Grof had one female patient who suddenly became convinced she had assumed the identity of a female of a species of prehistoric reptile. During the course of her hallucination, she not only gave a richly detailed description of what it felt like to be encapsuled in such a form, but noted that the portion of the male of the species's anatomy was a patch of colored scales on the side of its head. What was startling to Grof was that although the woman had no prior knowledge about such things, a conversation with a zoologist later confirmed that in certain species of reptiles colored areas on the head do indeed play an important role as triggers of sexual arousal. The woman's experience was not unique. During the course of his research, Grof encountered examples of patients regressing and identifying with virtually every species on the evolutionary tree (research findings which helped influence the man-into-ape scene in the movie Altered States). Moreover, he found that such experiences frequently contained obscure zoological details which turned out to be accurate.

Regressions into the animal kingdom were not the only puzzling psychological phenomena Grof encountered. He also had patients who appeared to tap into some sort of collective or racial unconscious. Individuals with little or no education suddenly gave detailed descriptions of Zoroastrian funerary practices and scenes from Hindu mythology. In other categories of experience, individuals gave persuasive accounts of out-of-body journeys, of precognitive glimpses of the future, of regressions into apparent past-life incarnations. In later research, Grof found the same range of phenomena manifested in therapy sessions which did not involve the use of drugs. Because the common element in such experiences appeared to be the transcending of an individual's consciousness beyond the usual boundaries of ego and/or limitations of space and time, Grof called such manifestations "transpersonal experiences", and in the late '60s he helped found a branch of psychology called "transpersonal psychology" devoted entirely to their study. Although Grof's newly founded Association of Transpersonal Psychology garnered a rapidly growing group of like-minded professionals and has become a respected branch of psychology, for years neither Grof or any of his colleagues were able to offer a mechanism for explaining the bizarre psychological phenomena they were witnessing. But that has changed with the advent of the holographic paradigm. As Grof recently noted, if the mind is actually part of a continuum, a labyrinth that is connected not only to every other mind that exists or has existed, but to every atom, organism, and region in the vastness of space and time itself, the fact that it is able to occasionally make forays into the labyrinth and have transpersonal experiences no longer seems so strange.

The holographic paradigm also has implications for so-called hard sciences like biology. Keith Floyd, a psychologist at Virginia Intermont College, has pointed out that if the concreteness of reality is but a holographic illusion, it would no longer be true to say the brain produces consciousness. Rather, it is consciousness that creates the appearance of the brain -- as well as the body and everything else around us we interpret as physical. Such a turnabout in the way we view biological structures has caused researchers to point out that medicine and our understanding of the healing process could also be transformed by the holographic paradigm. If the apparent physical structure of the body is but a holographic projection of consciousness, it becomes clear that each of us is much more responsible for our health than current medical wisdom allows. What we now view as miraculous remissions of disease may actually be due to changes in consciousness which in turn effect changes in the hologram of the body. Similarly, controversial new healing techniques such as visualization may work so well because, in the holographic domain of thought, images are ultimately as real as "reality".

Even visions and experiences involving "non-ordinary" reality become explainable under the holographic paradigm. In his book "Gifts of Unknown Things," biologist Lyall Watson describes his encounter with an Indonesian shaman woman who, by performing a ritual dance, was able to make an entire grove of trees instantly vanish into thin air. Watson relates that as he and another astonished onlooker continued to watch the woman, she caused the trees to reappear, then "click" off again and on again several times in succession. Although current scientific understanding is incapable of explaining such events, experiences like this become more tenable if "hard" reality is only a holographic projection. Perhaps we agree on what is "there" or "not there" because what we call consensus reality is formulated and ratified at the level of the human unconscious at which all minds are infinitely interconnected. If this is true, it is the most profound implication of the holographic paradigm of all, for it means that experiences such as Watson's are not commonplace only because we have not programmed our minds with the beliefs that would make them so. In a holographic universe there are no limits to the extent to which we can alter the fabric of reality.

What we perceive as reality is only a canvas waiting for us to draw upon it any picture we want. Anything is possible, from bending spoons with the power of the mind to the phantasmagoric events experienced by Castaneda during his encounters with the Yaqui brujo don Juan, for magic is our birthright, no more or less miraculous than our ability to compute the reality we want when we are in our dreams. Indeed, even our most fundamental notions about reality become suspect, for in a holographic universe, as Pribram has pointed out, even random events would have to be seen as based on holographic principles and therefore determined. Synchronicities or meaningful coincidences suddenly makes sense, and everything in reality would have to be seen as a metaphor, for even the most haphazard events would express some underlying symmetry. Whether Bohm and Pribram's holographic paradigm becomes accepted in science or dies an ignoble death remains to be seen, but it is safe to say that it has already had an influence on the thinking of many scientists. And even if it is found that the holographic model does not provide the best explanation for the instantaneous communications that seem to be passing back and forth between subatomic particles, at the very least, as noted by Basil Hiley, a physicist at Birbeck College in London, Aspect's findings "indicate that we must be prepared to consider radically new views of reality". 

slightlybehind

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #144 on: April 17, 2008, 10:25:56 AM »

.


Tagging the thread, oliver? Or you just did not make it to post what you wanted to? Just curious, you know :)

ex nihilo

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HA!
« Reply #145 on: April 21, 2008, 02:35:22 PM »
If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

spotonjane

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #146 on: April 24, 2008, 03:20:07 AM »
45 minutes examples and explanations... 15 minutes air guitar.

R E M

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #147 on: May 05, 2008, 11:44:08 AM »

If you're not gay, a druggie, a fag hag or a whore, don't even think about going to Crobar -- you'll be treated as a nuisance.
 

crobar appears to be like law school


LOL r e g g i e ;)




I went last month to Rimini -- it's famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic." The city itself does not have any clubs, but many of its bars have dance floors that are frequently packed. The atmosphere is more geared to tourists and families -- however, the city is notable in disco music history for its Cosmic Club who's DJ Daniele Baldelli played records from a moving elevator to the young experimental audience. Baldelli's important contribution to the world of DJing is perhaps overshadowed by his American counterparts, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy. You will find a large number of wine bars, pubs and creperies in the three small squares that stretch from the old fish market to the main street in the city. The zone is packed with the young people all year round and generally is the first stop on an evening out where they mix and invite each other to the discotheques later in the evening.

amantadine

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #148 on: May 05, 2008, 12:13:20 PM »



I went last month to Rimini -- it's famous for its nightlife, and is known as the "Ibiza of the Adriatic." The city itself does not have any clubs, but many of its bars have dance floors that are frequently packed. The atmosphere is more geared to tourists and families -- however, the city is notable in disco music history for its Cosmic Club who's DJ Daniele Baldelli played records from a moving elevator to the young experimental audience. Baldelli's important contribution to the world of DJing is perhaps overshadowed by his American counterparts, Frankie Knuckles and Ron Hardy. You will find a large number of wine bars, pubs and creperies in the three small squares that stretch from the old fish market to the main street in the city. The zone is packed with the young people all year round and generally is the first stop on an evening out where they mix and invite each other to the discotheques later in the evening.


Can you easily find X there?

Vigilance

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Re: What can you do to push and motivate yourself?
« Reply #149 on: May 06, 2008, 02:51:17 PM »

Nothing beats LSD .. the insight you gain during the introspection of just one trip is worth years of self-exploring and soul-searching. Law school and lawyering, with its snobism, pretentiousness and fake arrogance, will seem funny to you afterwards ..


The real reason LSD needs to be illegal is not because it makes a tiny percentage of its users crazy, but because of what it does to the vast majority ... LSD does not attract non-conformists so much as it is creates them. One can not, for example, after a serious immersion in LSD, go back to the 9-to-5 world of sales managers and upward mobility. Better to work for yourself, doing something simple and useful, which was why so many hippies became entrepreneurs, farmers, craftspeople. For most, the psychedelic experience dealt a serious blow to their desire for power, and all those buttresses to the power urge that go by the name ambition. The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less cocksure, happier but less self satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance, yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable Mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.

"Bad trips" on LSD result from the 11-hour forced introspection that the drug creates. Most cannot stand to look that closely at themselves, certainly not for that long. That's why Leary and company were getting complete cures of psychotics after five or six guided LSD trips, of course, before the government stepped in and outlawed the drug. Well, movie "The Passion of Christ," by Mel Gibson is like being on acid for two straight hours, only the subject isn't yourself, it is Jesus.

Dr. Timothy Leary, interviewed by Playboy, announced that LSD was the most powerful aphrodisiac ever discovered. "Let me put it this way," he said, "compared with sex under LSD, the way you have been making love -- no matter how ecstatic the pleasure you think you get from it is like making love to a department-store-window dummy. "The three inevitable goals of the LSD session are to discover and make love with God, to discover and make love with yourself, and to discover and make love with a woman."


It looks like to me one's trying to keeping one's guard up, keeping one's distance, with their sharp edges hardened to resist being blunted and dulled by external influences... Adopting a boxer's stance when dealing with others... with toe drawing therir line of defense and battling all who dare to cross or go against them. With fists raised and determination coiled, waging their own war of independence against a do what you're told and one-size-fits-all world. Well, my friend, power is not in form but in nature.

In glassmaking there is a phenomena that occurs when a small glob of molten glass is rapidly cooled. The result is a solid, tadpole-shaped object with a bulbous head that tapers to a delicate curved tail. Despite their fragile look, Rupert's Drops seem indestructible. Direct sledgehammer blows glance off ineffectually. They were first introduced as toys in the 17th century to the court of King James I by his grandson, Prince Rupert of Bavaria. The real beauty of Rupert's Drops is not in their appearance or strength but in their nature. While seemingly indestructible, one clip or snip of delicate tail's tip explodes the Rupert's Drop into a powdery handful of harmless dust. It is the nature of Rupert's Drops, born of the rapid cooling of surface over warm interior, that accounts for their phenomena -- an explosive disintegration of form back to particle beginning.

You are born full-blown but spend much of your life by forcing others to understand you and accept you. Your function is to be more droplet of water, not ocean, for you've did-it-and-done all before. Nature is discovered in the tails of Rupert's Drops; in souls for you. Accepting that others may not ever approve or understand you, because they can't, is the snip of realization that explodes and disintegrates your defensiveness. Others, like glass, mature by the process of annealing. They take form under more evenly tempered conditions and require a slower, more steady pace for development. Through step-by-step guidance and experience, others bloom, grow, and ripen to self-realization: not you. You come with self-realization snugged into conscience. When you draw your lines of defiance and pen your lists of demands, you not only deny others access to you but limit yourself in terms of your person and purpose. Erasing that line that divides you and others frees you to be as born and meant.

Your power only reveals when you stop expecting and stop demanding confirmation of and for self. Once you accept that validation for you cannot be had externally, you lower your fists. Where once shrillness was heard and desperation felt, there is quiet and calmness instead. You hear but one voice and feel the fullness of your so-long felt but misunderstood and misused strength. Only from soul, through guidance of intuition and by way of emotions, you will receive all you need to be yourself and meet your responsibilities. Your fulfillment is experiencing, for you've already passed all possible life lessons. You are not here to serve self, but to help others BE their own selves fully.