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Author Topic: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?  (Read 15207 times)

nesty

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #60 on: September 30, 2005, 03:09:42 PM »

In the real world, say in a big law firm, the atmosphere is not like that. It's the law school that is the most challenging time period of lawyers' life.

HA, this is truly beautiful!

COrox

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #61 on: October 02, 2005, 06:47:03 PM »
Law students want pretty much to eat each-other. Beacuse they are in fierce competition with one-another (courtesy of the artificially introduced forced curve) they tend to disregard their empathy and cooperative aspects of their personality.
Wow. This is so not my school.  But then again, the collegial environment is why I chose to attend. 

I agree with COrox.  What school are you at?  My school is nothing like this...

Colorado. It's very humane.

Mon Ami Gabi

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #62 on: October 07, 2005, 04:50:29 PM »

In the real world, say in a big law firm, the atmosphere is not like that. It's the law school that is the most challenging time period of lawyers' life.

HA, this is truly beautiful!

Indeed it is! Anyway, I've got to go now and study a bit Property -- I have that crazy stuff to nail down RAP and Wait and See Doctrine!
"Tear down that female dog of a bearing wall and put a window where it OUGHT to be!"

jjason

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #63 on: October 10, 2005, 06:59:43 PM »
But Mary... I don't like you..









JK

chlorineblitch

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #64 on: November 08, 2005, 01:32:38 PM »
Quote
What was the hardest thing about your 1L?

The candy-assed classmates.

lawgirl21

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #65 on: November 09, 2005, 10:31:49 AM »
I defeintely have to say the way that everyone stares around the class and tries to figure out who are the top students....  so that they can beat them on the exam...

Plus those annoying girls who flirt with the professors in class...  Sure they're nice to look at..  Sure they take up class time..  And sure the flirting won't help their grade..   But it is still annoying, especially when you are discussing about a subject you actually like.. ... 

But mostly the passive agressive way in which people pick your brain to see how smart you really are!!!!!!!!! 
GPA: 3.6
LSAT: 154, then 159

175

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #66 on: November 13, 2005, 11:19:26 PM »
The hardest thing is seeing constantly miserable faces that pretend they are not.

emc

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #67 on: January 12, 2006, 06:12:44 AM »

In Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four there is a particularly chilling scene in which, after the director of the Ministry of Love has subjected Winston Smith to intense physical tortures, he employs another strategy in the process of Smith's gradual re-education.

"This time it will not hurt," [O'Brien] said. "Keep your eyes fixed on mine."
   At this moment there was a devastating explosion, or what seemed like an explosion.... A terrific, painless blow had flattened [Smith] out. Also something had happened inside his head ... somewhere or other there was a large patch of emptiness, as though a piece had been taken out of his brain.
   "It will not last," said O'Brien. "Look at me in the eyes.... Just now I held up the fingers of my hand to you. You saw five fingers. Do you remember that?"
   "Yes."
   O'Brien held up the fingers of his left hand, with the thumb concealed.
   "There are five fingers there. Do you see five fingers?"
   "Yes."
   And he did see them, for a fleeting instant ... there had been a moment -- he did not know how long, thirty seconds, perhaps -- of luminous certainty, when each new suggestion of O'Brien's had filled up a patch of emptiness and become absolute truth, and when two and two could have been three as easily as five, if that were what was needed ...
   "You see now," said O'Brien, "that it is at any rate possible."


Compare this passage to Karl Llewellyn's famous description of the student's first year of law school: "The hardest job of the first year is to lop off your commonsense, to knock your ethics into temporary anesthesia. Your view of social policy, your sense of justice -- to knock these out of you along with woozy thinking, along with ideas all fuzzed along their edges."

Bot of course when we undertake the resolution of hard issues it will always be the case that the relevant legal concepts, the demands of social policy, and the ideal of justice will by necessity appear to sensitive interpreters to be "fuzzed along their edges." That very same formal, empirical, and ethical fuzziness is, after all, what makes hard issues hard. A successful legal education therefore both sharpens and desensitizes the adept's sense of analytical complexity, sharpening it so that the advocate can identify various plausible arguments, and then deadening it for the purpose of making and (especially) deciding between such arguments. This  characteristic doubleness of the legal mind produces the doubleness of the literal sophomore -- of the brilliant simpleton who understands and exploits and at appropriate times forgets -- the evidentiary problems, conceptual incommensurabilities, and ethical dilemmas that always characterize legal issues. To be trained to think like a lawyer is to be taught how to evoke all the chaotic complexity of law, and then how to repress the intolerable doubt that same evocation can produce by going on to achieve the "luminous certainty" required of the advocate or judge.   


Wow, pretty strong statements here!

ApproachTheBench

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #68 on: January 12, 2006, 10:24:30 AM »
Yeah, I really think stuff like this is kinda silly:

 "The hardest job of the first year is to lop off your commonsense, to knock your ethics into temporary anesthesia. Your view of social policy, your sense of justice -- to knock these out of you along with woozy thinking, along with ideas all fuzzed along their edges."

I have no idea why anyone would suggest doing that.  It's just school.  Just some classes you go to to learn how things work, really.  In the grand scheme of things I don't think it's all that important or really all that difficult (once you figure out how to give the profs what they want.) 

Why I'd have to do anything with my ethics, view of social policy or sense of justice is beyond me.
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Highway

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Re: What was the hardest thing about your 1L?
« Reply #69 on: January 12, 2006, 12:38:49 PM »
The hardest thing is trying to write papers in the proper format. I don't think in TRAC, and I sure a hell don't like to write that way. I have always done very well in writing classes in the past, but having to now write in TRAC format (or whatever you want to call it at your school) is very painful. I made a mistake on my second paper and wrote it more like a term paper (basically just forgot what I was doing). The professor tore it apart, but I still think it was a very well written paper that addressed the topic quite thoroughly. I remain, to this day, very satisfied with the work I did on that paper, and I think it is better than anything else I have written using TRAC format.

I also know somebody who actually taught legal writing for a few semesters, and she told me that it wasn't until she had been out of school for five years that she finally "got it." She still doesn't like it, though, and is taking creative writing courses at a local college to help her balance it out.