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Author Topic: Getting state residency while in school  (Read 3902 times)

jomolungma

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Getting state residency while in school
« on: April 05, 2005, 07:22:16 PM »
I've heard this is exceedingly difficult in Pennsylvania.  However, I was wondering if anyone knew for sure whether owning a house and having your wife work in Pittsburgh, in addition to being registered to vote, having your car registered in PA, your license in PA, filing taxes in PA and other little things, will guarantee residency by 2L assuming these were in place for a year by then.  Anyone?

SleepyGuyYawn

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Re: Getting state residency while in school
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2005, 12:44:48 AM »
I don't think it would guarantee it, but I'm pretty sure you'll have a good chance.  I have a friend at Pitt who said that she knows people who've gotten in-state after the first year.  I don't think it's impossible, and you seem to have as good a claim as anyone.

seankenn

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Re: Getting state residency while in school
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2005, 12:05:34 PM »
I am in the same boat.  I am hoping to get in-state.  It's a gamble, but I like to let it ride.  I think you have a great shot.  A wife and a house are great starts.  I don't think I will have either of those next year.  So you definitely have a leg up on me.  First thing I am going to do when I get settled is to register my car, get a PA license, and register to vote. If your wife has a job you will file in-state taxes, so I think you have a much better outlook than I do.

Good Luck! 

rapunzel

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Re: Getting state residency while in school
« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2005, 10:21:59 PM »
When I moved to Pittsburgh to go to grad school at Pitt my husband had a job in PA.  That was sufficient to get in-state tuition.  I had to fill out a form to have them consider my request.  We bought a condo in Regent Square a few months later, but that wasn't necessary to acquiring the status.  We also had PA driver's licenses and had paid income taxes in PA the year before.

So if your wife has a PA job I think you should be good to go.  Without that it could be more difficult.

thediesel32

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Re: Getting state residency while in school
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2005, 12:26:47 AM »
I am also out of state and want to get state tuition for 2L. I thought you just had to live in the state for 8-9 months beforehand to get the tuition? Since 1L are not allowed to work- i dont know how i will be be filing income taxes unless its some sort of investment.

jomolungma

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Re: Getting state residency while in school
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2005, 07:24:56 AM »
This is why I've heard it is so hard in PA.  For some reason they don't just go by time lived in state and primary residence like most other states do.  I haven't scoured the PA code to see if there are actual guidelines in there, my guess is that it's a common law thing, but apparently the review board at Pitt is pretty strict in adhering to these guidelines.

SleepyGuyYawn

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Re: Getting state residency while in school
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2005, 10:06:38 AM »
Well, I know in Michigan it's really difficult to get in-state tuition.  In fact, I have a friend who followed all of the rules to the letter to get residency for the University of Michigan as an undergrad.  He worked in Michigan for over a year, he registered to vote, changed his licence, paid state income taxes, got utilities in his name -- did everything.  And he still was denied with no reason given. 

He appealed though and he was given residency on appeal.  And I've heard of more than just my friend having a similar experience at the U of Mich.  It's like they just deny everybody who's even borderline and see if they appeal. 

My point is that if you aren't given residency and you think you've fufilled the requirements, you should appeal.

joshie

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jomolungma

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Re: Getting state residency while in school
« Reply #8 on: April 19, 2005, 02:47:59 PM »
http://www.bc.pitt.edu/students/tuitionguide.php

enjoy.
I've read this before.  I've also called and emailed the individual that overseas the tuition eligibility.  However, nobody was able to give me a definitive answer, and I don't suppose one is available.  You just have to appeal and see what happens.  I don't have any of the "lock" type things, like prior 12-month residency, continuing contacts, military, etc.  I will just have a lot of the asterisked things.  So I guess it's a crapshoot.

joshie

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Re: Getting state residency while in school
« Reply #9 on: April 19, 2005, 04:42:02 PM »
well, as I can see from the petition, there are two arguments to make:

1.  you have been in PA for at least a year for a purpose other than going to school.
2.  you intend to remain in PA after graduation.

You would make the second argument.  you would prove that you intend to remain in PA after graduation by submitting documentation relating to you purchasing a home in PA.  The fact that you have bought a home in PA is solid evidence supporting your contention that you plan on living in PA after you graduate.  You would also submit your marriage certificate as well as proof that your wife has lived here for x amount of  years. 

Important to note that any student could say they plan on living in PA.  This is not the burden of proof: you need to convince them that it would be crazy for you not to live in PA after you graduate.  your situation is different because you can actually prove intent, rather than just asserting that you intend to live in PA.

of course there is no definitive answer, they do it on a case by case basis.