Law School Discussion

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Which of these guys would you love to be with??

Matt Damon- yummy
 2 (22.2%)
Ben Affleck- ya, no more Jennifer
 2 (22.2%)
Richard Gere, Who cares about the gerbil
 1 (11.1%)
Denzel Washington, hmm hmm good
 0 (0%)
George Clooney, i'll take you away from being single
 1 (11.1%)
Donald Trump, lets go shopping
 0 (0%)
My current boyfriend , husband, fiance
 3 (33.3%)
My Ex, why can't we be together still
 0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 8

Author Topic: Best study method  (Read 8823 times)

carrie

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2005, 09:31:46 PM »
Yeah, where is LawGirl??????

Lawgirl, where do you go that prepped you so well in terms of exam-taking?

Mary

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2005, 09:40:15 PM »
I wonder the same thing! :(


Yeah, where is LawGirl??????

Lawgirl, where do you go that prepped you so well in terms of exam-taking?

rezipsa

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #12 on: April 08, 2005, 07:36:42 PM »
Yeah, where is LawGirl??????


She is too busy trying to study the "black letter law."

lawgirl

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #13 on: April 08, 2005, 08:44:27 PM »
Yeah, where is LawGirl??????


She is too busy trying to study the "black letter law."

I'm not sure why you would have a problem with that. It has served me well so far so I am happy with it.

Aside from that, I just finished doing an appellate brief, an appellate oral argument, and assisting in some mock criminal trials on top of my regular homework. That's why I haven't been around much.

birddog

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2005, 12:56:56 PM »
I've said this elsewhere, but if you find that outlining doesn't work for you, don't feel that you have to do it just because everyone else is.  I've never outlined and I've done very well in school.  I have a friend who only outlines if the exam is in class (rather than a take home) because he only needs to have quick access for an in class exam.  Others feel that they really learn the stuff when they have to outline to go over it.

I don't outline because I just find myself typing things in mindlessly - sometimes copying straight from the book which doesn't help me.  I tend to go through my notes (handwritten) and highlight important points, sometimes writing those points into another, more condensed notepad.  For example, for my first amendment exam I just wrote out the rules on separate pieces of paper and added notes about how to best apply them.

I'd add a few other pieces of advice: if you do buy hornbooks I'd read them during the semester - you run out of time at the end.  For example, when you start discovery in Civ Pro, I'd read the chapter on discovery in the E&E (most people say the E&E for Civ Pro is the best).  That way you get a good overview and see how the pieces fit together.

I'd also suggest writing at least one practice exam before your first set of exams.  At least for me, there was just something about that blank piece of paper and figuring out how to best structure an answer.  I know people use IRAC or whatever, but you still have to come up with the words and with that first sentence.  I remember looking around during my first exam and a full half the class couldn't figure out what to start with.

Finally, I liked reading through sample exam questions (from the prof are best though those are limited) and answers.  CrunchTime series usually has good ones for a lot of courses.  That helps you figure out how to apply the law - it isn't just about knowing the black letter law.  Most of your class will enter the exam knowing the same black letter law that you do.  To distinguish yourself you'll have to apply it well.

All I can think of now... perhaps I should get back to my own exam studies...

il Principe

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2005, 02:04:14 AM »
Outlining, no doubt.
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rapunzel

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2005, 08:19:17 AM »
I never formally outline.  It just doesn't help me.  I do practice exams.  You can't make it through a pratice exam without articulating the appropriate law.  (I usually have the book, my notes, an upperclassmen's old outline and a commercial outline at hand as I do this.  And maybe a study group member or two).  But unlike an outline, a practice exam gives you practice with the application.  Time is a huge factor on law school exams, so it is a great help if you have already pondered how to organize answers for the type of questions you will get.  Plus a prof's old exams give you a lot of clues to the way that they think and what areas they might focus on. 

I think outlining alone works well for people who have a natural facility for legal analysis and an innate sense of organization.  But I also think that I have seen a lot of hardworking law students sacrifice themselves at the altar of outlining for very mediorce results.  Most people need to learn how to write an exam.  So outlining alone is generally not sufficient.  Problem is that, apparently, for many profs it was enough.  So they tell generation after generation of law students that if they would only spend hours and hours outlining their courses from scratch, they would be sure to succeed.  Unfortunately, that is simply not true for the majority who represent a wide variety of learning styles unrepresented by this formalistic approach.

LawJockey

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #17 on: November 09, 2005, 08:10:49 PM »
4 out of 5 law school grads I've asked have said outlining is the best study method.
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mikey4400

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2005, 02:50:03 AM »
My torts exam is an open book exam. Should I state the law straight from the casebook or from how my professor defines it?

jd2b06

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Re: Best study method
« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2006, 03:50:42 AM »
I've said this elsewhere, but if you find that outlining doesn't work for you, don't feel that you have to do it just because everyone else is.  I've never outlined and I've done very well in school.  I have a friend who only outlines if the exam is in class (rather than a take home) because he only needs to have quick access for an in class exam.  Others feel that they really learn the stuff when they have to outline to go over it.

I don't outline because I just find myself typing things in mindlessly - sometimes copying straight from the book which doesn't help me.  I tend to go through my notes (handwritten) and highlight important points, sometimes writing those points into another, more condensed notepad.  For example, for my first amendment exam I just wrote out the rules on separate pieces of paper and added notes about how to best apply them.

I'd add a few other pieces of advice: if you do buy hornbooks I'd read them during the semester - you run out of time at the end.  For example, when you start discovery in Civ Pro, I'd read the chapter on discovery in the E&E (most people say the E&E for Civ Pro is the best).  That way you get a good overview and see how the pieces fit together.

I'd also suggest writing at least one practice exam before your first set of exams.  At least for me, there was just something about that blank piece of paper and figuring out how to best structure an answer.  I know people use IRAC or whatever, but you still have to come up with the words and with that first sentence.  I remember looking around during my first exam and a full half the class couldn't figure out what to start with.

Finally, I liked reading through sample exam questions (from the prof are best though those are limited) and answers.  CrunchTime series usually has good ones for a lot of courses.  That helps you figure out how to apply the law - it isn't just about knowing the black letter law.  Most of your class will enter the exam knowing the same black letter law that you do.  To distinguish yourself you'll have to apply it well.

All I can think of now... perhaps I should get back to my own exam studies...


So how exactly did you study if you didn't outline?  I know for most people it is an incredible time commitment to outline... how else did you allocate your broad study time if not to outline?  The reason why I ask is because I don't think outlining will work for me either... or help me "think" through and learn the material.  I'll just end up copying verbatim from some commercial outline... waste my time and at the end of it have learned nothing.  I think a lot of people are scared to admit that outlining just isn't for them... simply because EVERYONE and their dog does it.