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Author Topic: Supreme Court Rules Junevile Death Penalty Unconstitutional  (Read 7355 times)

m e t a n o i a

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Re: Supreme Court Rules Junevile Death Penalty Unconstitutional
« Reply #30 on: November 24, 2008, 09:48:36 PM »

[...] They are often convinced that the celebrity is sending them cryptic messages intended only for them to understand. Erotomanic delusions last an average of 10 years.


I can just imagine what hell the chased person must have gone through during those 10 years!


Horrible indeed! The core of the syndrome is that the affected person has a delusional belief that another person, usually of higher social status, is secretly in love with them. The sufferer may also believe that the subject of their delusion secretly communicates their love by subtle methods such as body posture, arrangement of household objects and other seemingly innocuous acts (or, if the person is a public figure, through clues in the media). The object of the delusion usually has little or no contact with the delusional person, who often believes that the object initiated the fictional relationship. Erotomanic delusions are typically found as the primary symptom of delusional disorder, or in the context of schizophrenia.

Occasionally the subject of the delusion may not actually exist, although more commonly, the subjects are media figures such as popular singers, actors and politicians. Erotomania has been cited as one cause for stalking or harassment campaigns. The assassination attempt of Ronald Reagan by John Hinckley, Jr. was reported to have been driven by an erotomanic delusion that the death of the president would cause actress Jodie Foster to publicly declare her love for Hinckley. Late night comedian David Letterman and retired astronaut Story Musgrave were the targets of delusional Margaret Mary Ray. Other reported celebrity targets of erotomania include Madonna, Steven Spielberg, Zachary Quinto, Britney Spears, Barbara Mandrell, and Linda Ronstadt.
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Tic-Tac-Toe

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He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not (2003)
« Reply #31 on: November 25, 2008, 07:00:53 PM »


"He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not" is a clever French film that begins as a romance and ends up as a thriller. I personally like this kind of story, in which nothing you see at the beginning is what it seems. [The most famous example, perhaps, is Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo"] While this movie might prove too deceptive and cynical [or even a bit cruel] for some viewers, I think it wll prove rewarding for those who like films that `think outside the box'. The movie begins much like any standard romance. Angelique [Audrey Tautou], a promising young artist, is madly in love with Loic [Samuel Le Bihan], a successful cardiologist. She sends some flowers and a painting she did to his office to show her affections. She is house sitting for a family who has gone away for a year. Her life seems almost perfect until it dawns on her that the doctor doesn't keep the promises he makes to her -- he doesn't show up for dates, he refuses to leave his wife, etc. Slowly, she sinks into a depression. She later plots her revenge against her `unfaithful' man. But what is really going on between these two?

Tautou is the French actress who charmed audiences around the world a while back as "Amelie." Here, she proves she is more than a big smile, wide eyes and an odd hairdo; in fact, she looks completely different. She is a most accomplished actress. Samuel Le Bihan is first rate as the object of her affection. The movie is in French with English subtitles. These do not bother me in the least, but I am well aware that some people refuse to watch a movie in a foreign language. I say that that's their loss.
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unexceptionabl

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" la folie... pas du tout"
« Reply #32 on: December 11, 2008, 09:33:42 PM »


"He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not" is a clever French film that begins as a romance and ends up as a thriller. I personally like this kind of story, in which nothing you see at the beginning is what it seems. [The most famous example, perhaps, is Alfred Hitchcock's "Vertigo"] While this movie might prove too deceptive and cynical [or even a bit cruel] for some viewers, I think it wll prove rewarding for those who like films that `think outside the box'. The movie begins much like any standard romance. Angelique [Audrey Tautou], a promising young artist, is madly in love with Loic [Samuel Le Bihan], a successful cardiologist. She sends some flowers and a painting she did to his office to show her affections. She is house sitting for a family who has gone away for a year. Her life seems almost perfect until it dawns on her that the doctor doesn't keep the promises he makes to her -- he doesn't show up for dates, he refuses to leave his wife, etc. Slowly, she sinks into a depression. She later plots her revenge against her `unfaithful' man. But what is really going on between these two?

Tautou is the French actress who charmed audiences around the world a while back as "Amelie." Here, she proves she is more than a big smile, wide eyes and an odd hairdo; in fact, she looks completely different. She is a most accomplished actress. Samuel Le Bihan is first rate as the object of her affection. The movie is in French with English subtitles. These do not bother me in the least, but I am well aware that some people refuse to watch a movie in a foreign language. I say that that's their loss.


I'm British and am not really supposed to like the French -- I'm not sure why, I think it's something to do with Agincourt, Napoleon and the Eurovision Song Contest. Despite this I am frankly enamored with them because they're so much cooler than we could ever be. It is because they are so comfortable in their own skin that they can get away with movies which would be embarrassing if made by the British and ghastly if made by the Americans. " la folie... pas du tout" falls into this category. Sartre had a gift for doing philosophy in a hip, wine drinking, story telling, bohemian way. This movie has done a disturbing, psychological, tragic romance in a beautiful, sumptuous, fist-bitingly lovely way. I'm sure it's something to do with being French.

The only thing that irked me was that the script and plot were both repeatedly, albeit momentarily, clumsy. For a movie so graceful in terms of acting and direction it was sad that the screenplay couldn't quite keep pace. On the upside the acting was great. I'm probably biased as it's only a profound laziness that stops me stalking Audrey Tautou, but she was marvelous. The story moved quickly and even the marginally avant garde perspective shift was beautifully achieved. The conclusion is wonderfully dark and leaves you feeling that the plot has been going somewhere and that you've arrived there quite unexpectedly.

Had the script been a little more polished I'd have given it more marks. Having said that I don't expect that anybody involved in the movie will be crying themselves to sleep because some random internet bloke has given them 8 out of 10.

Orietta

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Re: Supreme Court Rules Junevile Death Penalty Unconstitutional
« Reply #33 on: January 19, 2009, 06:19:59 AM »

They say, "Murder is, by definition, a crime of passion." The question is who's passionate. 
 

LOL quantum - "The Deadly Look of Love"!


Indeed, one, the movie is kinda funny!

analemma

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TWISTED SISTERS (1992)
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2009, 10:12:54 AM »
In Final Analysis, Richard Gere stars as Isaac Barr, a San Francisco psychiatrist whose alluring patient Diana Baylor (Uma Thurman) is being treated for traumatic memories. In order to find out more about her trauma, Diana suggests that Isaac speak to her sister and question her about what went on between them in the past. But when Isaac sets eyes on Diana's sister Heather (Kim Basinger), they become involved in a torrid and steamy sex affair. Unfortunately, Heather is married to psychotic sadist Jimmy Evans (Eric Roberts).



When you consider how smoothly made it is, how crammed with tricks and reversals and loop-the-loops, the movie would seem to offer audiences the chance for a first-rate emotional whiplash. Yet there's an oddity about this particular roller coaster: The more you stay on it, the more it feels as if you're still climbing that first big hill - still waiting for the plunge, the rush. Early on, there are funny, teasing therapy sessions between the scrupulous Dr. Barr (Gere) and Diana (Uma Thurman), a mysterious young woman who appears to be shielding herself from some forgotten horror. Then Barr agrees to meet with her older sister, Heather (Kim Basinger), and an atmosphere of desperate romance develops. He's lonely and placid, too obsessed with his work, and she's an emotionally fragile sexpot married to a crooked and sadistic contractor (Eric Roberts). Not only that, but she suffers from the Hitchcockian-sounding ailment of "pathological intoxication" - one or two sips of alcohol, and she goes psycho. Final Analysis isn't predictable or even particularly implausible (as this sort of thing goes); it's a methodical piece of middle-grade trash. Still, there's a spark of exhilaration missing. The picture is like Hitchcock without the spryness, the wit: You feel as if you're on a guided tour of a thriller. Look over there - it's the courtroom scene! And the double cross, and the femme fatale who's so, so cold!

Joanou has a gift with actors, which means that his two rather bland leads seem less bland than usual. Gere, cast against type, plays the shrink as a courtly, likable healer, a guy so focused on other people's thoughts he seems dissociated from his own. Basinger works hard to act luminous and unstable, but she remains a fundamentally unexciting actress; she's like a stand-in for the real star. The most gripping performers are on the sidelines: Eric Roberts, a master of hyperbolic sliminess (he's like Cagney playing a pimp on steroids), and Uma Thurman, who brings her underwritten role a hundred shades of curiosity, brattishness, and hopeless romantic fervor. She couldn't be a stand-in if she tried.

Callixena

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Re: Supreme Court Rules Junevile Death Penalty Unconstitutional
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2009, 10:39:54 AM »

LOL quantum - "The Deadly Look of Love"!


Indeed, one, the movie is kinda funny!


What's so funny about it, Orietta?

prima materia

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Re: Supreme Court Rules Junevile Death Penalty Unconstitutional
« Reply #36 on: May 05, 2009, 02:42:56 PM »

In Final Analysis, Richard Gere stars as Isaac Barr, a San Francisco psychiatrist whose alluring patient Diana Baylor (Uma Thurman) is being treated for traumatic memories. In order to find out more about her trauma, Diana suggests that Isaac speak to her sister and question her about what went on between them in the past. But when Isaac sets eyes on Diana's sister Heather (Kim Basinger), they become involved in a torrid and steamy sex affair. Unfortunately, Heather is married to psychotic sadist Jimmy Evans (Eric Roberts).



When you consider how smoothly made it is, how crammed with tricks and reversals and loop-the-loops, the movie would seem to offer audiences the chance for a first-rate emotional whiplash. Yet there's an oddity about this particular roller coaster: The more you stay on it, the more it feels as if you're still climbing that first big hill - still waiting for the plunge, the rush. Early on, there are funny, teasing therapy sessions between the scrupulous Dr. Barr (Gere) and Diana (Uma Thurman), a mysterious young woman who appears to be shielding herself from some forgotten horror. Then Barr agrees to meet with her older sister, Heather (Kim Basinger), and an atmosphere of desperate romance develops. He's lonely and placid, too obsessed with his work, and she's an emotionally fragile sexpot married to a crooked and sadistic contractor (Eric Roberts). Not only that, but she suffers from the Hitchcockian-sounding ailment of "pathological intoxication" - one or two sips of alcohol, and she goes psycho. Final Analysis isn't predictable or even particularly implausible (as this sort of thing goes); it's a methodical piece of middle-grade trash. Still, there's a spark of exhilaration missing. The picture is like Hitchcock without the spryness, the wit: You feel as if you're on a guided tour of a thriller. Look over there - it's the courtroom scene! And the double cross, and the femme fatale who's so, so cold!

Joanou has a gift with actors, which means that his two rather bland leads seem less bland than usual. Gere, cast against type, plays the shrink as a courtly, likable healer, a guy so focused on other people's thoughts he seems dissociated from his own. Basinger works hard to act luminous and unstable, but she remains a fundamentally unexciting actress; she's like a stand-in for the real star. The most gripping performers are on the sidelines: Eric Roberts, a master of hyperbolic sliminess (he's like Cagney playing a pimp on steroids), and Uma Thurman, who brings her underwritten role a hundred shades of curiosity, brattishness, and hopeless romantic fervor. She couldn't be a stand-in if she tried.


The tyrant sister basically had taken the place of the over-I [superego] in the other sister, Diane, and she stayed there. What Heather offered to her sister was a new, psychological dispensation.

theme

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Re: Supreme Court Rules Junevile Death Penalty Unconstitutional
« Reply #37 on: May 15, 2009, 10:45:03 AM »

[...] They are often convinced that the celebrity is sending them cryptic messages intended only for them to understand. Erotomanic delusions last an average of 10 years.


Does the person substitute for it with a new one? For instance, does s/he become obsessed with another celebrity?


A quick Google search does not provide any off-hand answers. Anyone?

Wolsey

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Re: Supreme Court Rules Junevile Death Penalty Unconstitutional
« Reply #38 on: November 29, 2011, 10:44:39 PM »

They say, "Murder is, by definition, a crime of passion." The question is who's passionate.
 

LOL quantum - "The Deadly Look of Love"!


Delusional stalkers frequently have little, if any, contact with their victims. They have major mental illnesses like schizophrenia, manic-depression or erotomania, and come from an abusive or emotionally barren family background with a poor sense of their own identity.  They hold tight to some false belief that keeps them tied to their victims. In erotomania, the stalker's delusional belief is that the victim loves him. This type of stalker actually believes that he is having a relationship with his victim, even though they might never have met. The woman stalking David Letterman, the stalker who killed actress Rebecca Schaeffer and the man who stalked Madonna are all examples of this. Another type of delusional stalker believes he is destined to be with someone, and that if he only pursues her hard enough and long enough, she will come to love him as he loves her. These stalkers know they are not having a relationship with their victims, but firmly believe that they will some day. John Hinckley Jr. and his obsession with Jodi Foster is an example of this type of stalker.

Delusional stalkers are typically unmarried and socially immature loners who are unable to establish or sustain close relationships with others. They rarely date and have had few, if any, sexual relationships. Since they are both threatened by and yearn for closeness, they often pick victims who are unattainable in some way; married women, a therapist, clergyman, doctor or teacher. Those in the helping professions are particularly vulnerable to delusional stalkers. Any kindness shown to this kind of stalker will be blown out of proportion into a delusion of intimacy. What these stalkers cannot attain in reality is achieved through fantasy. While some seek out a victim of higher status (doctors, lawyers, teachers), others seek out celebrities. Celebrity stalkers often psychotically "hear" or "see" something in the words or appearances of the victim. They are often convinced that the celebrity is sending them cryptic messages intended only for them to understand. Erotomanic delusions last an average of 10 years.


erand, does the woman/man of the movie qualify as erotomanic or not?


Another bad example of how American culture makes heroes out of criminals ..

Flatbush

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Re: Supreme Court Rules Junevile Death Penalty Unconstitutional
« Reply #39 on: February 27, 2012, 04:36:10 PM »

[...] They are often convinced that the celebrity is sending them cryptic messages intended only for them to understand. Erotomanic delusions last an average of 10 years.


I can just imagine what hell the chased person must have gone through during those 10 years!


Horrible indeed! The core of the syndrome is that the affected person has a delusional belief that another person, usually of higher social status, is secretly in love with them. The sufferer may also believe that the subject of their delusion secretly communicates their love by subtle methods such as body posture, arrangement of household objects and other seemingly innocuous acts (or, if the person is a public figure, through clues in the media). The object of the delusion usually has little or no contact with the delusional person, who often believes that the object initiated the fictional relationship. Erotomanic delusions are typically found as the primary symptom of delusional disorder, or in the context of schizophrenia.

Occasionally the subject of the delusion may not actually exist, although more commonly, the subjects are media figures such as popular singers, actors and politicians. Erotomania has been cited as one cause for stalking or harassment campaigns. The assassination attempt of Ronald Reagan by John Hinckley, Jr. was reported to have been driven by an erotomanic delusion that the death of the president would cause actress Jodie Foster to publicly declare her love for Hinckley. Late night comedian David Letterman and retired astronaut Story Musgrave were the targets of delusional Margaret Mary Ray. Other reported celebrity targets of erotomania include Madonna, Steven Spielberg, Zachary Quinto, Britney Spears, Barbara Mandrell, and Linda Ronstadt.


There's a not-very-accurate belief that the delusional disorder (paranoia) is almost always linked with homosexuality. That's not really the case. Take a look at this post:


[...] The paranoid preoccupation with homosexuality has sometimes been explained as reflecting "unconscious homosexual impulses." This locution is misleading, in that it is not usually genital urges that stimulate homophobia; it is loneliness and the wish for a soulmate. Because as children we were comfortable with peers of the same sex before we became comfortable with opposite-sex peers, and because people of the same sex are more like us than people of the opposite sex, when we are withdrawn from everyone, we are attracted to someone of the same sex. Unfortunately, the patient becomes aware of this attraction, misinterprets it as homosexuality, and this sets off the defenses. In other words, at the core of the self-experience of paranoid people is a profound emotional isolation and need for a "consensual validation" from a "chum."