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Author Topic: Women in Law School  (Read 2606 times)

WKRUSE

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2005, 02:56:17 PM »
Wow.  I am just glad I have a wife who loves me, does a good job of maintaining our home, did well in school and has succeeded at work.  If you are confident enough in yourself, you won't need to bash women around you who are successful. 

rapunzel

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2005, 09:33:57 PM »
Sure the divorce rate was once lower, the rate of abused women suffering in silence was also much higher. 

Yes, we need strong marriages and well parented children.  But that doesn't mean that women need to return full time to the home.  Perhaps men and women, husbands and wives, need to strive for balance in their careers and their duties as parents and spouses and the coporate world needs to recognize that top notch employees function better when they have some energy reserved for their famliy lives.  The healthy development of future generations needs a society that places real value on the family and encourages equal parenting by both parents.  Women, by their gender alone, should not be consigned to one role alone.

rick8481

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2005, 09:30:04 AM »
The problem is that no matter how hard couples may strive to balance their professional lives and roles as parents and spouses, the professional world is simply not structured to support such a balance. Schools have become day-care centers for working parents.  And as far as healthy marriages go, with two people living two lives and following two dreams, how can the concept of marriage possibly withstand the selfishness of society?  The fact is that we are quickly becoming a selfish and money hungry society.  First it was just the men.  Now it is both men and women.  Congratulations on becoming an equal part in losing touch with humanity in the hopes of attaining what culture deems as success.  We can now share our miserable and concieted day to day lives.

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rapunzel

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2005, 07:51:27 PM »
Women don't go into the workplace soley because they are greedy.  They want to use their talents to make a difference in the world, they want to provide economic value to their families, they want to have choices and autonomy.  Meanwhile an ever increasing amount of men are strengthening their ties to the home and their children, not because they do not like their work, but because they want to enjoy what they are working for.

"Society" will respond to the dictates of it's members.  The more professionals of either gender who ask their employers for flex-time, part-time, and on-site daycare, the more companies will respond to keep their talent.  We are starting to realize that we can't shift one parent to the workplace without compensating in the home.  Society has changed many times, and it will change in response to this concern.  We now have the Family Medical Leave Act and more and more men are takin advantage of it.  Instead of crying for the good old days, our generation has the oppurtunity to shape better days. 

 

jla

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2005, 10:19:58 PM »
I don't want someone who will agree with me all the time.

I agree.  Those who do not agree will likely be able to find a sale on blow-up dolls.
-My  two widow's mites that are worth their weight in air.

mucho

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2008, 12:01:25 PM »

Women don't go into the workplace soley because they are greedy.  They want to use their talents to make a difference in the world, they want to provide economic value to their families, they want to have choices and autonomy.  Meanwhile an ever increasing amount of men are strengthening their ties to the home and their children, not because they do not like their work, but because they want to enjoy what they are working for.

"Society" will respond to the dictates of it's members.  The more professionals of either gender who ask their employers for flex-time, part-time, and on-site daycare, the more companies will respond to keep their talent.  We are starting to realize that we can't shift one parent to the workplace without compensating in the home.  Society has changed many times, and it will change in response to this concern.  We now have the Family Medical Leave Act and more and more men are takin advantage of it.  Instead of crying for the good old days, our generation has the oppurtunity to shape better days. 


A professor told us women's complaints about the law school environment and corporate culture are unbased since, after all, you can never satisfy a woman. What does a woman want, he asked the question rhetorically. A woman has absolutely no idea what she wants.
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juliemccoy

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2008, 01:48:11 PM »
Old thread... but ok, I'll comment.

I disagree that a woman can "have it all" and be wife/mother AND working professional. One is going to take priority over the other. A man, however, can have it all. There's more pressure in society for a man to be professionally successful than women. While there are men who want a well-matched equal, I know plenty of others who want a wife that is there to mind the home and kids. If she works, it is a job that isn't on par with his.

If you're a woman and you want to "have it all" (that great fiction women were fed in the 70's...), then the only solution I can see is letting strangers raise your kids or hiring a live-in nanny.
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