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Author Topic: Women in Law School  (Read 2650 times)

Tortfeasor07

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Women in Law School
« on: February 22, 2005, 09:11:36 PM »
To the guys out there in law school...does your stock really rise significantly after law school? Does the quality of hot chicks get a lot better w/ a JD? These whoremongers in law school w/ me are too argumentative. What ever happened to the women from my Mom's generation who had kids, cleaned the home, and knew how to shut the hell up when needed?


Jackie O

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2005, 10:15:41 PM »
You MEN have no idea what it's like to be a woman in a male dominated environment. We're the modern day black face. As they struggled in the 60's, we still struggle today in the professional world.
If I'm in sweats, I go unnoticed, but if I'm in jeans that look as if they've been painted on, then I'm loved. I have learned how to manipulate the system and am leveling the playing field by using what I have.
Being that this is so snonymous, I'll even go as far as to say that I've played my Torts professor like a fiddle, which set me up to possibly make journal. So, 15 mins to him will probably amount to a lifetime of success for me! In the end who got the better deal? I thought so...

unlvcrjchick

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2005, 04:54:53 AM »
Seems to me that Tortfeasor is just a troll who wants to cause trouble on these boards.  Get your mindset out of the 1930s and get well acquainted with the 21st century.  I'm so glad that women of this generation refuse to put up with the having-children-pleasing-the-husband antiquated bull. You no doubt want the women to shut up because you probably know, deep down, that the women of which you complain possess legal abilities of the caliber that put yours to shame; what's the matter, afraid to be one-uped by a woman?   

rick8481

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2005, 01:24:18 PM »
Hey unlvcrjchick,

What is so antiquated with wanting to have kids and please spouses?  Are you suggesting that it is not possible for a woman to have children, please her husband, and be professionally successful?  The problem with the "women of this generation" is that they think functioning in a maternal role, which is a unique and vital social quality women possess, is somehow at odds with professionalism.  I want a wife who wants to have kids and please me just as she would probably want a husband who wants to have kids and please her.

Tortfeasor07 is probably just in a dry spell and desperately needs some action, or purposefully trying to get a reaction out of us.  (the last sentence gives him away) 

He probably wants his women to shut up because he hasn't met or isn't interested in meeting someone he enjoys having a conversation with.

I think tortfeasors stupid comment at the end inspired a reactionary argument from you that doesn't make much sense either.
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Wild Jack Maverick

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2005, 01:31:03 PM »
What ever happened to the women from my Mom's generation who had kids, cleaned the home, and knew how to shut the hell up when needed?

I think those women adapted from a society where Dads supported their families, marital rape and abuse was hush-hush, and the prisons weren't overcrowded, to the new society where marital rape and abuse hasn't yet become a big legal issue, 50% of marriages end with divorce, and plenty of dads would rather go to prison instead of working and supporting the kids.

Since all of the men are on vacation, the women must step in, get an education, and work.

The year is now 2005.
"I enjoy being in school. I've learned so much already, with taking economics and law, and I have marketing and statistics coming up next."

x

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2005, 05:19:11 PM »
You MEN have no idea what it's like to be a woman in a male dominated environment. We're the modern day black face. As they struggled in the 60's, we still struggle today in the professional world.
If I'm in sweats, I go unnoticed, but if I'm in jeans that look as if they've been painted on, then I'm loved. I have learned how to manipulate the system and am leveling the playing field by using what I have.
Being that this is so snonymous, I'll even go as far as to say that I've played my Torts professor like a fiddle, which set me up to possibly make journal. So, 15 mins to him will probably amount to a lifetime of success for me! In the end who got the better deal? I thought so...

You're not really comparing the plight of women today to that of blacks in the 60s...are you?

unlvcrjchick

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2005, 01:06:38 AM »
Rick,

I am in no way suggesting that women can't both be married mothers and have successful professional endeavors; where do you think I stated this?  What I was referring to when I used the term antiquated was the notion that women's primary function in today's society is to get married, have kids, please her husband, and that's it.  Let's face it, this was the state of society for innumerable years, and change has only come about in this regard as recently as the 1960s.  Granted, there were women before the 60s who were professionals as well as married mothers, but this was not the norm.

Frankly, I'm sick of those women who feel that their lives are incomplete until they have children, and thus, fulfill their "vital social quality," as you call it, for the benefit of the community.  Well, reproduction is no longer the vital role that it once was.  If you think it is just as vital as it used to be, try to tell yourself that when you're stuck in rush-hour traffic.

Instead of fulfilling my "vital social quality" role as a mother, I prefer to exercise responsibility through population control; besides, who wants to raise a child in this day and age anyway?  Certainly not me, and if my prospective future husband has any qualms about my decision, I'll continue to stay single and happy.

duma

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2005, 01:59:16 AM »
Personally, I love women with spice. I don't want someone who will agree with me all the time.

rapunzel

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2005, 04:47:12 PM »
That is because you are strong enough in your own abilities so as not to feel threatened by a woman with brains.

It's usually the men who can't compete that pine for the good old days of subservience.

special cupcake

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Re: Women in Law School
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2005, 09:45:39 PM »
What I was referring to when I used the term antiquated was the notion that women's primary function in today's society is to get married, have kids, please her husband, and that's it.  Let's face it, this was the state of society for innumerable years, and change has only come about in this regard as recently as the 1960s.  Granted, there were women before the 60s who were professionals as well as married mothers, but this was not the norm.

When this was the "state of society" (i.e., pre- Women's Liberation movement), divorce rates were much lower.  9.2 women per 1000 married women over the age of 15 got divorced in 1960.  In 1970, that number grew to 14.9, and a decade later to 22.6. (source: http://www.hec.ohio-state.edu/famlife/divorce/demo.htm#demographic%20trends)  Perhaps it's abstract to make a connection between the rise of broken families and the embrace of the 'liberated' woman (though I think there are grounds for this argument).  However, my point is that women who choose to embrace the "antiquated bull" of getting married, raising children, and pleasing her husband - without pursuing a professional career as well - are in fact central to the healthy development of future generations.  Furthermore, women who feel their lives would be fuller if they had a family to spend it with usually go the "antiquated bull" route for personal happiness, not because they feel they need to fill some "societal role."