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Author Topic: Knowing what you know now, What would you do differently before law school?  (Read 2726 times)

ElizaB

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Re: Knowing what you know now, What would you do differently before law school?
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2005, 02:53:57 PM »
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NearBurned

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Re: Knowing what you know now, What would you do differently before law school?
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2005, 05:56:34 PM »
I would fix my credit to obtain more student loans so that I didn't have to go to LS part-time and work full-time.

midjeep

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I would fix my credit to obtain more student loans so that I didn't have to go to LS part-time and work full-time.

Oh great, now I am getting worried  :-\

I had a deliquent credit card (long story but I paid off a credit card, moved, but didn't cancel the card....had a fraudulent charge added but didnt know, and it went unpaid for three years). The deliquency was taken care of, but I am still in the process of cancelling more cards I didn't even know I had.

Another thing to add to my list of things to do before law school. This is almost starting to feel like a "things I would like to do before I die" kinda list  ;)
The Internet is for porn and Lexis points.

angelalex

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Definitely perfect your typing skills. Read a lot, including some boring *&^%, just for practice. Go to a law school section in a bookstore (law SCHOOL section, not real law stuff) and just get familiar with all the supplements and study aids. After that, it depends on your major.
     If you majored in pre-law or you've been around lawyers your entire life, relax and hit keg parties all summer.
     I majored in philosophy and minored in English. I'm not sure when all that "deep thinking" is supposed to come in handy.... Law school readings (mostly cases) can be long and hard and boring, but once the rules are sifted out, it's all memorization. Compared to people who majored in areas like accounting and math, I need MEMORIZATION skills--which require a high tolerance for repetition, something I lack. This summer, I will work on memorization!
     At my school, the impact of writing skills is minimal the first year--one 3-hour class first semester, and I now know that legal writing breaks most of the rules of "good" writing in other academic fields.
     So...if I were doing it all over, I would work on memorization and read something like Law School Without Fear. Twice. Maybe once in July and once in August.
     I would also watch Law and Order often. Seriously. It'll give you a context for your criminal law class.

menses

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Not really!

insidedition

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Skimming
« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2006, 12:25:43 AM »

Oh great, now I am getting worried  :-\

I had a deliquent credit card (long story but I paid off a credit card, moved, but didn't cancel the card....had a fraudulent charge added but didnt know, and it went unpaid for three years). The deliquency was taken care of, but I am still in the process of cancelling more cards I didn't even know I had.

Another thing to add to my list of things to do before law school. This is almost starting to feel like a "things I would like to do before I die" kinda list  ;)


Be careful of skimmers: it's the theft of credit card information by a dishonest employee of a legitimate merchant, manually copying down numbers, or using a magnetic stripe reader on a pocket-sized electronic device. Common scenarios for skimming are restaurants or bars where the skimmer has posession of the victim's credit card out of their immediate view. The skimmer will typically use a small keypad to unobtrusively transcribe the 3 or 4 digit Card Security Code which is not present on the magnetic stripe.

Cards in countries such as the UK are issued featuring a smart chip with public key encryption. The chip cannot be copied, but the card number, expiry date and security code can be, and this set of data is often sufficient to use the the victim's credit card account for fraudulent purposes with so-called "card not present" transactions, i.e. over the telephone or internet.