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Author Topic: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.  (Read 5129 times)

notanyothergirl

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Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« on: February 03, 2005, 05:33:53 PM »
So my essays were like, A's, and my Multiple Choice exams were like, C's.  Know of any great ways to overcome a multiple choice aversion?  Any particular study aids that seem to work? ???

Dean Prosser

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2005, 05:50:00 PM »
CALI CALI CALI!

rapunzel

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2005, 05:55:23 PM »
I have the same problem.  CALI is very good.  The profs practice exams if you can get them.

I find objective testing very frustrating.  Give me an essay and I can "lawyer" away at it and do very well.  I don't know what happens when the same information shows up in multiple choice.

I want to be a bit cranky about it and insist that in the real world there will never be multiple choice.  But in the real world there won't be frantic issue spotting in three hour bursts either, so I'll quit my grumbling.

duma

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2005, 11:00:09 PM »
There are plenty of MC study aides out there. Practice... practice.... practice.

rapunzel

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2005, 09:08:30 PM »
I know, but so frustrating.  I tried to study Evidence with PMBR multiple choice questions.  I got about 30% of the questions right.  Meanwhile I'm the in trial ad class and can actually argue an objection better than anyone who wasn't studying trial tactics I'm sure.  In other words I know the material very well and something happens in the mutiple choice computation that sends it all awry.

I have created a forced regimine of mc study for my tax class, but I have very little hope of success.

dtonsing

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2005, 08:26:31 AM »

How to Study for Multiple Choice Examinations

The advice suggested (above) by Prosser, Duma and Rapunzel (use CALI, practice, practice, practice) is excellent.  But wait, there’s so much more you can do!

Take a look at the information I’ve assembled for our students at this link:
http://www.dennistonsing.com/FAQS_LINKS.html#Multiple.  You will you find several superb study aids described there, as well as the detailed study & strategy analysis by University of Missouri at Kansas City Law School’s Professor Rogelio A. Lasso (it’s linked to the website).  That article is very helpful. 

Rapunzel writes (above) that she “…know the material very well,” yet has difficulty scoring well on multiple choice questions.  Here’s why: knowing the material is essential, but students also need to, as Professor Lasso explains, “…understand the unique way in which these multiple-choice questions are asked.”  Once that understanding is achieved, students need to practice answering using specific strategic methods. 

Rapunzel also adds: “I want to be a bit cranky about it and insist that in the real world there will never be multiple choice.  But in the real world there won't be frantic issue spotting in three hour bursts either, so I'll quit my grumbling.”  Of course she is right … but the “real world” of lawyers includes that little speed bump known as the bar examination.  Guess what: 200 multiple choice questions stand between you and your career.  If you are able to master multiple choice exam answering during law school, you will substantially lessen your bar exam anxiety, and enhance your likelihood of passing the bar exam the first time around.

By the way, Professor Lasso’s fine article is based on Michael Josephson’s work, “Evaluation and Grading in Law School” (1984) with additional material by University of Dayton School of Law Professor Vernellia Randall.  Professor Josephson used to operate Josephson’s Bar Review Course in the 1970s (I took his course to help me pass the California Bar in 1974), and Professor Randall is often referred to as the “Godmother of Academic Support” – that is, you couldn’t ask for better advice.

If you find more helpful information about multi-choice studying, send me an email and I’ll add it to my site.  Thanks!

Dean of Students
Academic Support Program Director
Roger Williams University School of Law
Bristol, RI
Recent Publication: "1000 Days to the Bar -- But the Practice of Law Begins Now" (Wm. S. Hein & Co., Inc., 2003)

Esq

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2005, 08:55:32 AM »
One point about using the PMBR questions to study for a law school Evidence test.  The PMBR questions are geared for the Multistate Bar Exam ("MBE").  Of the six topics on the MBE, the Evidence questions are generally regarded as the most "tricky." Also, the PMBR practice questions only test on the Federal Rules of Evidence because the MBE only tests on the Federal Rules of Evidence. I do believe the PMBR practice questions are essential for studying for the MBE portion of the bar exam; however, if you only worked 50 or 100 evidence questions for a law school exam and found yourself getting 30 percent right, that would not be unusual because most people who start using the PMBR questions to study for the bar exam do not do better than 40 percent correct on the Evidence questions in the first few weeks of study. PMBR recommends that you do 50 MBE questions a day, every day, while studying for the bar exam. It takes this much practice because all the questions on the MBE are tricky but the the Evidence questions are very tricky.
 

rapunzel

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2005, 07:54:57 PM »
Thanks, Esq., the whole experience was demoralizing. But it is nice to know it is demoralizing to all.

 And thank you Mr. Tonsing, I'm going to try some of the strategies on your link.  My tax prof's advice on the whole matter was "Well, work harder."  Meanwhile the only person to break into the A minus range on her midterm was a CPA who does tax work at his job.  I LOVE tenured professors!

EASTWEST

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2005, 06:10:12 PM »
I have the same problem as you. Recently, i started to realize that because i understand the material better than most that i have been overanalyzing the MC questions. Go with your intuition, and don't try to "lawyer" each of the answers into being an acceptable response.

footlong

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Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2005, 08:02:20 PM »
For a multiple choice exam you've to get a commercial outline and memorize the black letter law -- do not read cases in your textbook like a stupid would do!