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Author Topic: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT  (Read 3929 times)

Slyone

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #20 on: January 15, 2005, 11:48:02 PM »
Yes, and your criticism of NSL and its students was exceptionally acute, discerning and enlightened.
I've found that recycling works well with bullyboy slag.
In the immortal words of Bob Dylan "Don't criticize what you can't understand".
AMFYOYO

I like how you recycle my dig at you without changing anything aside from the agent of ridicule. This is clearly the mark of an accomplished intellect.

HTH.
If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought, not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.
Oliver Wendell Holmes

DOWNY

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2005, 12:37:53 AM »
My "criticism" was a mere relaying of facts by virtue of performing calculations in light of NSL's index number calculation formula, which is publically available on its website.

I provided numbers only- you are free to draw your own conclusions from them.

And yes, there are elements of NSL that I do not understand.

I truly HTH.

Slyone

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2005, 08:01:13 AM »
Those calculations were incorrect weren't they?
I don't think you understand NSL at all. You don't understand the reason for its existence nor its mission.
Of course you can make foul accusations and assumptions but you still don't get it.......
No hard feelings.
AMFYOYO
My "criticism" was a mere relaying of facts by virtue of performing calculations in light of NSL's index number calculation formula, which is publically available on its website.

I provided numbers only- you are free to draw your own conclusions from them.

And yes, there are elements of NSL that I do not understand.

I truly HTH.
If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought, not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.
Oliver Wendell Holmes

DOWNY

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2005, 09:50:11 PM »
Those calculations were incorrect weren't they?

No, they were not.

HTH

Slyone

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #24 on: January 16, 2005, 10:18:10 PM »
from ebol's post supra:
"Let me make a few corrections:

1) Someone who gets a 125 on the LSAT is not smart enough to get a 4.0 in college.  In my opinion you need to be in the 130+ range before you are smart enough to get As even at the lamest major in the worst college in the country.

2) In order to get a 125 on the LSAT you need to get over 20 questions correct. (http://www.powerscore.com/lsat/help/scale.htm) In fact, 0-15 questions correct will not even get you past 120.  It is only once you are past about 15 correct questions that your score starts moving up.   So it is not correct that blindly marking A for every question would yield a higher score, although it would be close."
 
 
 
If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought, not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.
Oliver Wendell Holmes

DOWNY

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2005, 11:30:34 PM »
1. There is no data to support this argument. He is merely making the claim, subjectively and without data, that someone with a 4.0 would NEVER score a 125 on the LSAT. Sure, it may be unlikely, but even so that does not disprove the model relayed by the numbers, which is that NSL will accept super-low LSAT scores as per its own index number target.

This does not disprove anything. It is the mere argument that it is unlikely for a 4.0 student to get a 125 on the LSAT. Even if that's true, it in no way mitigates the criticism of NSL's POTENTIAL to accept 125 LSAT scorers. If you still don't think that statistic is relevant, look at Cooley, which requires a 143 LSAT, EVEN IF the applicant is at a 4.0. See the difference?

And, while not common, people with close to 4.0's and LSAT's in the 120-130 range do apply to schools. Go look at the LSAC data for schools like Cooley and Thurgood Marshall. Some people get high GPAs at TTTs and then tank the LSAT.

Also, even assuming that the argument was correct that a 125 cannot fit with a 4.0, it is still irrelevant. Why? Because earlier in my original post I performed a calculation showing that a 3.0 and a 140 could be admitted- here there is very little disparity in GPA and LSAT. The point is the same, even if the MOST EXTREME example, while still mathematically accurate, may be unlikely.

2. This is irrelevant. Maybe a 125 is 20 questions instead of 5. SO WHAT? The point is that it is easy to score a 125, and hypothetically someone who does can get into NSL. It is of no import whatsoever if 20 questions are needed for a 125 versus 5.

Finally, this in no way disputes any of the calculations I performed, as the numbers (from NSL's) site would still permit someone with a 125 to get in. It doesn't matter in the least how many questions need to be answered correctly for this to happen.

You are not very good at interpreting the relevant implications of either math or verbal arguments.

HTH.

Slyone

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #26 on: January 18, 2005, 12:09:14 PM »
Well I had a 117 on the LSAT and and 2.3 undergrad and I was admitted.
Is it cold up there today Downy?
If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought, not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.
Oliver Wendell Holmes

camelbx

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #27 on: January 18, 2005, 02:23:49 PM »
"Well I had a 117 on the LSAT and and 2.3 undergrad and I was admitted.
Is it cold up there today Downy?"

Is this supposed to make you sound better? What is the point of saying that you made a score below the possible range? Are you so stupid LSAC invented a score for you? Really, DOWNY doesn't have to try very hard with you people does he?

Carbolic

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #28 on: January 18, 2005, 06:05:26 PM »
who cares?  look up the professional board of responsibility in michigan and you'll see there are just as many douchebags being disbarred and censured from cooley as there are yale, harvard, or any other law school.

and by the way, lansing is a dump too.  the only reason anybody lives there is because people from michigan can't get into that third world country bazaar of a dump in ann arbor and they have to settle for msu.  the farmboy college.  if you ever get a chance to drive through ann arbor, make sure you bring an interpreter.

if you look at us news and world reports, cooley is fourth-tier-toilet, so don't sit around pretending you know how to add numbers.

Slyone

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Re: NSL: Chronicles of a TTT
« Reply #29 on: January 18, 2005, 09:22:11 PM »
No. No point. Yes. No.

Is this supposed to make you sound better? What is the point of saying that you made a score below the possible range? Are you so stupid LSAC invented a score for you? Really, DOWNY doesn't have to try very hard with you people does he?
If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought, not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.
Oliver Wendell Holmes