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Author Topic: Professor Lewis' LSAT  (Read 12933 times)

duma

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Re: Professor Lewis' LSAT
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2005, 12:07:41 AM »
If it could be done, I would have done it.

There is a 0.01% chance that someone could score a 180. So, you could have scored it.. but like everyone else that has taken the exam, you didn't.

jslick

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Re: Professor Lewis' LSAT
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2005, 01:08:20 AM »
I was told Lewis made a 180 on the LSAT and had to retake it as he was accused of cheating...
took it again and again got a 180. Went to Georgetown. Thank God there are intelligent people who enjoy teaching the law. We have some really high calibur professors!

If the original question pertains to Mr. Lewis' initial LSAT test prior to admission to law school, then (assuming he went to school prior to the early 1990's) he could not have scored 180 because prior to that period, the LSAT scale only reached 48.

This is a petty observation, and the real question is whether he achieved a perfect score at all.  Whether he did so one or more times is immaterial, as he has certainly earned the right to speak, not only from the lectern, but also from the bench as an interim judge (according to the NSL handbook).

Most students have probably realized, (hopefully before taking the LSAT), that the test is not necessarily an infallible indicator of academic or professional acumen.
Below is a link to a well-documented discussion of scandal surrounding the LSAT.  The author's bio cites his undergrad work: "B.S.F.S., International Affairs, Georgetown Univ. School of Foreign Service, 1966"

http://www.apxbothwell.com/publications/articles/law%20review%20article%20002.htm

If you think education's expensive, try ignorance.

Slyone

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Re: Professor Lewis' LSAT
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2005, 07:58:22 AM »
Thanks Slick.
If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought, not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.
Oliver Wendell Holmes

lawgroupie

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Re: Professor Lewis' LSAT
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2005, 04:28:42 PM »
Blaine,

If you are that intelligent, why aren't you at one of the Ivy'a? With a whopping score comes whopping scholarships.

Blaine Dixon's Love Child

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Re: Professor Lewis' LSAT
« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2005, 04:00:24 AM »
Groupie, I'm not Blaine. I'm Blaine Dixon's Love Child. There is a difference. I could never come close to filling the shoes of the man, the myth, the legend...T. Blaine Dixon. If you don't know who he is, you had better be finding out. He is a major player on Sidco Drive.

Georgetown is a great school they say. But if you aced the LSAT you would have gone to Harvard or Chicago and you would be Attorney General or wearing one of the black dresses on the Supreme Court...not practicing franchise law in nashville and teaching school at night.

When I said I would have aced the LSAT, that is what is known as humor. I partied my way to a 2.8 GPA during undergrad. Why else would I go to a non-ABA school?

coto29

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Re: Professor Lewis' LSAT
« Reply #25 on: March 10, 2010, 02:39:52 PM »
Nixon and Ben Stein are the only two people to ever have a 180 on the LSAT.