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Author Topic: Barbri outlines  (Read 8512 times)

jeffjoe

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Barbri outlines
« on: October 16, 2004, 10:49:42 PM »
So I gave up 50.00 to 'hold' the rate on the BARBRI and I got their first year review book which consists primarily of outlines.

Has anyone used these?  Do they help?

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zemog

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2004, 01:23:39 AM »
Isn't barbri for the bar?  I thought it was kind of early since I won't be taking it for another 4 years.  And also, I might get forced out after the 1L :(, so I didn't want to waste 50 bucks.

IHEARTLS

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2004, 02:36:22 AM »
I bought the FIRST YEAR REVIEW and UPPER LEVEL books off of ebay for $12.50 (for the set).  I've had them for about 4 weeks and after we finish a section I go back and review with the books.  I think they're great.  Enjoy!

Whit

PS: It's $175 for us to look in our rate!  NO FAIR!

JD_MSA

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2004, 09:31:34 AM »
Isn't barbri for the bar?  I thought it was kind of early since I won't be taking it for another 4 years.  And also, I might get forced out after the 1L :(, so I didn't want to waste 50 bucks.

I am a BarBri rep at my school.  They don't pay me to come on message boards and promote their product (in fact I don't get a paycheck from them at all) and I post here a lot, so hopefully you don't think I'm blowing smoke up your asses here.  I've personally used the outlines and I think they're outstanding.  I have the Upper Level Book in front of me right now.  :)

BarBri is widely considered the best bar prep course.  Upon signing up for the course (which you take right before the bar exam), you are immediately entitled to a First Year Review book and/or and Upper Level Review book (1Ls get the First Year Review book and then claim their Upper Level Review book next year to ensure that they get the newest edition).    These books contain the outlines for Torts, Property, Contracts, Crim, Con Law, Civ Pro, Evidence, Wills, Trusts, Corporations, and Crim Pro.  They also have a ton of review questions to help you prepare for exams. 

Before you buy the books on eBay, remember (1) the books are constantly updated, so the only way to get the newest edition (remember, the law changes all the time--this is especially true with recent developments in Con Law) is to sign up for BarBri; and (2) the outlines are FREE when you sign up for BarBri (which usually requires a deposit aomewhere in the neighborhood of $50-$200, depending on your state).  Also, by signing up, you are entitled to attend the exam review sessions that BarBri holds at many schools.   

I won't go into details why BarBri is the best bar prep course, but, chances are, you will sign up for BarBri at some point in the future.  If you sign up in your first year, you lock in the current tuition rate (which has been known to rise by as much as $200/yr.) and you get the outlines for free. 

jeffjoe

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2004, 03:14:24 PM »
I just glanced at the outlines for now.  Just not enuff time.

I noticed the criminal law outline had larceny, etc.  We are learning the consolidated theft statute, so this outline doesn't help.

But I used the contracts one to understand consideration a little better.  I'm glad to hear that others find them useful.  I won't turn my barbri first year book into a doorstop after all.
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ruskiegirl

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2004, 05:55:48 PM »
I have a BarBri bar review book (a hand-me-down) and I have found it helpful for outlining.  I take the basic outline from BarBri and fill it in with information from my casebook and class notes.  I haven't heard of the BarBri first year books before, but I will check them out. 

My only worry with using too many commercial outlines/supplements is that it tends to detract from the process of extrapolating the black letter law on your own. We have an academic support program for first years, and the tutor assigned to our mod has recommended that we start by outlining our class notes, case briefs, etc. without using commercial outlines, and then go back and fill in the gaps with supplements.  It makes sense to me, especially for students who go to schools where you aren't spoon-fed the black letter law and professors tend to "hide the ball" a little more.

jeffjoe

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2004, 06:17:39 PM »
I have a BarBri bar review book (a hand-me-down) and I have found it helpful for outlining.  I take the basic outline from BarBri and fill it in with information from my casebook and class notes.  I haven't heard of the BarBri first year books before, but I will check them out. 

I think we may be talking about the same thing.  The book is called the First Year Review and consists primarily of outlines for first year courses with some review questions and answers.

I had planned to create my own outlines, but I barely have time to take notes and brief cases.


I should mention that our profs don't seem to be hiding anything.  Our school has a heavy tendency toward the practical over the theoretical.
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ruskiegirl

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2004, 06:30:00 PM »
I have a BarBri bar review book (a hand-me-down) and I have found it helpful for outlining.  I take the basic outline from BarBri and fill it in with information from my casebook and class notes.  I haven't heard of the BarBri first year books before, but I will check them out. 

I think we may be talking about the same thing.  The book is called the First Year Review and consists primarily of outlines for first year courses with some review questions and answers.

I had planned to create my own outlines, but I barely have time to take notes and brief cases.


I should mention that our profs don't seem to be hiding anything.  Our school has a heavy tendency toward the practical over the theoretical.
Actually, mine is the actual Bar Review book, not the first year series you are talking about.  It has very basic outlines for the major areas of law. 

ruskiegirl

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2004, 06:37:49 PM »
It wouldn't make sense for your professors to hide the ball much.  NSL grads, as I understand it, can only practice in Tennessee, so you are probably reading many more cases from your local jurisdiction than schools that have a significant number of grads leaving the state upon graduation.  Such schools tend to teach more "theory"-- the process by which one can extract the law from the cases -- and focus less on teaching black letter law.  It wouldn't make sense for Stanford to teach predominantly California black letter law, because those grads would leave for jobs on the west coast would be completely lost.  Therefore, schools that tend to send grads to other jurisdictions for practice focus on teaching students how to figure out the law, no matter where they are.  It makes sense.  Each system serves its purpose and I wouldn't go so far as to say that one may be better than the other.

jeffjoe

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Re: Barbri outlines
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2004, 06:43:19 PM »
You're right.  NSL prepares us to practice in Tennessee and we read many Tennessee cases.

For contracts, we use a casebook, but for torts and criminal law we read opinions.  From crimes, we read very few cases outside Tennessee.

Our profs give us enough theory for us to understand the policy behind the law and sometimes not even that.

It wouldn't make sense for your professors to hide the ball much.  NSL grads, as I understand it, can only practice in Tennessee, so you are probably reading many more cases from your local jurisdiction than schools that have a significant number of grads leaving the state upon graduation.  Such schools tend to teach more "theory"-- the process by which one can extract the law from the cases -- and focus less on teaching black letter law.  It wouldn't make sense for Stanford to teach predominantly California black letter law, because those grads would leave for jobs on the west coast would be completely lost.  Therefore, schools that tend to send grads to other jurisdictions for practice focus on teaching students how to figure out the law, no matter where they are.  It makes sense.  Each system serves its purpose and I wouldn't go so far as to say that one may be better than the other.
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