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Author Topic: Grading Curve Question  (Read 11187 times)

lalala

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Re: Grading Curve Question
« Reply #50 on: March 13, 2006, 06:35:33 PM »
NotReally - why does your law school have such a sh-tty policy?  Not even calculating your GPA or giving you a placement?  No GPA or class placement on resume. That seriously p-sses off firms.  They'll assume the worst.


I've heard that Penn doesn't rank or issue official GPAs.  So it must not piss firms off that much -- Penn grads seem to do pretty well.

burghblast

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Re: Grading Curve Question
« Reply #51 on: March 13, 2006, 08:18:33 PM »
NU has a mandatory curve that applies only to classes with more than 40 students.  So essentially, I think everyone gets between an A+ and an A- in every class after the first year?  Who knows, guess I'll find out in a year.

3-7% of the class must get an A+
12-15%, A
10-15%, A-
15-30%, B+
20-35%, B
10-15%, B-
0-7.5%, C+
0-7.5%, C
0-7%, D
0-7%, F

As far as I know, professors do not give any grade lower than a B- under any circumstances.  To graduate with highest honors you need a 4.20GPA; high honors, 3.97; honors, 3.65.

J D

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Re: Grading Curve Question
« Reply #52 on: March 13, 2006, 08:51:55 PM »
NU has a mandatory curve that applies only to classes with more than 40 students.  So essentially, I think everyone gets between an A+ and an A- in every class after the first year?  Who knows, guess I'll find out in a year.

3-7% of the class must get an A+
12-15%, A
10-15%, A-
15-30%, B+
20-35%, B
10-15%, B-
0-7.5%, C+
0-7.5%, C
0-7%, D
0-7%, F

As far as I know, professors do not give any grade lower than a B- under any circumstances.  To graduate with highest honors you need a 4.20GPA; high honors, 3.97; honors, 3.65.

And I thought my school's curve was generous, sheesh...  ;)
"I never think of the future.  It comes soon enough."--Albert Einstein

modena99

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Re: Grading Curve Question
« Reply #53 on: July 25, 2006, 02:01:23 PM »
Class rank may mean something at schools with higher curves. However, you have to wonder how accurate rankings are considering the lack of feedback on exams and the lack of grade gradations. Some schools only give out B-, B, B+, A-, and A. This is a problem considering law schools don't give out many As. Feedback is a problem because we really get little justification for the grades, which creates all these myths surrounding grading.

Also, the effectiveness of low grading curves are very questionable at low ranking law schools. The low grading curves create high attrition, which results in a major shift in class rank after the first or second years. This is whether you consider percentile or simply numerical position. The class rank is practically useless and the grading faces the same problems as the higher ranked schools. The exception being the lower ranking schools do not have the grade inflation and gradation problems but the attrition problem. Then there's always the question of feedback and explanation of grades.

The curve is just a way for schools to cover their behinds for admitting people the ABA and mertiocrats don't believe should be in law school. These naysayers refuse to let the bar exam sort people out and refuse to let law schools accept responsibility for not preparing graduates. Now, I'm not saying the schools are necessarily admitting people out of the goodness of their hearts, but the curve is used to placate the ABA. The ABA is no stranger to threatening schools with the revocation of their accreditation. The Professors don't want this type of blow to their egos or pockets. It's not all about bar passage. It's about accreditation. There's a number of schools with poor bar passage rates but they still keep their accreditation for whatever political reasons. The problem with low ranking law schools is they don't (or can't) balance the necessity of improving the employment prospects of their students and starve off the ABA or demands of large recruiters at the same time.   

I think it is dishonest for any law school to not inform their students of their grading policy before admitting them. It is an important factor in considering whether you want to spend the time and money required for law school and law practice. There should be more accountability and transparency with these law schools.