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Author Topic: Withdraw v. Transferring  (Read 2332 times)

LawBound2005

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Withdraw v. Transferring
« on: October 05, 2004, 06:07:08 PM »
Hi--

I'm currently a law student at a 4th tier school.  Unfortunately, I am very disappointed with the faculty, law school facilities, and difficult nature of transferring out of the school (due to the strict grading curve, lack of faculty cooperation regarding letters of recommendation, etc).  I was wondering what some thought about withdrawing from the current law school I am at.  Would this be a smart move (considering my circumstances) or do you think it would adversely affect my chances of gaining admission into another school?  Bear in mind I have a low LSAT score, but do plan on retaking, in the event I do withdraw, in December.  Do you think, even with a higher LSAT score, that my dropping out for the reasons I stated above would harm my chances of being admitted into another school?  Does anyone know of others who have also withdrawn from their law schools, reapplied elsewhere, and were accepted?

Any information, recommendations, insight, is greatly appreciated!

Mark

stallionau

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Re: Withdraw v. Transferring
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2004, 10:28:18 PM »
Mark,

I made a last minute decision this summer to transfer from a Tier III school to a Tier I school. I also had a low LSAT score (I took it twice before applying - actually did worse the second time). Although I gave up a spot at the top of my class and a position on law review at my old school, it was the best decision I have made so far in my life. I was unhappy with my old school for many of the same reasons you mentioned. If you did well at your current school, I would recommend not to take the LSAT again. I have found that many schools barely look at transfer students' LSAT scores, and instead look primarily at your 1L performance (namely because LSAT is "supposed" to be an indicator of 1L performance). The reasons you listed are valid - especially in regard to faculty and facilities. I would also focus on why you want to transfer to the school of your choice. You should always try and stay positive as opposed to negative. However, I would check into your options about transferring in the winter - many schools require that you earn at least 30 credits from their school. I hope this helps - feel free to ask me any questions.

Tony

elo

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Re: Withdraw v. Transferring
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2004, 01:19:50 AM »
Do not, for any reason, withdraw. Nearly all law schools have a strict grading curve. If you're transferring, you need to beat it. Most schools will not pay much attention to LSAT scores for transfer applicants, as the grades accomplish what the LSAT is intended to (predict chance of success in law school). If your professors won't write LORs for you (which seems unlikely), then get them somewhere else.

stallionau

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Re: Withdraw v. Transferring
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2004, 03:32:47 PM »
I agree about not withdrawing - make sure you are accepted before you do anything drastic.