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Author Topic: Outlining Torts  (Read 3920 times)

edythec

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2004, 04:08:43 PM »
Don't worry about the case names.  There are very few cases you need to know by name (there are some, but few).  Yes, it sounds impressive in class to be able to say something like in the case Harry v Sally the plaintiff yada yada yada, but the important thing is to remember the law that the case developed.  The only cases I would try to remember by name would be those that are mentioned for you to know, but are not covered in class (hint, hint).
"Ever notice that 'What the hell' is always the right decision?" - Marilyn Monroe

Dicta

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2004, 10:22:25 AM »
He's only mentioned 2 or so...
Do you mean cases that are on the syllabus we didn't go over?
Come on Edythe, help some 1Ls out!
Susan
Until you go too far, you will never know how far you can go.
TS Eliot (poorly paraphrased by myself)

edythec

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2004, 08:43:03 AM »
Sorry guys, I've been dying in Property!  Davidson will tell you point blank if a case is important enough to remember by name.  Only one I remember right now is McIntyre V Ballentine and I don't think you have covered it yet.  Know your elements and how they apply.  Use the cases only as examples.  Make sure you have read any cases that didn't get covered in class, because on the final he will ask about a section that doesn't get covered in class.  I don't remember him asking such items on the mid-term however.  The exam is all multiple choice, the extra credit T/F (the class did ask for extra credit, right?).  The problem with the test is that all of the answers are "right".  You have to pick which one is the most right or the least wrong. All of the questions are scenario based.  I did my outline based simply on the elements of the torts.  If I remember correctly, the torts up until mid-term are pretty straight forward.  Now your elements backwards and forwards and know how they apply.
"Ever notice that 'What the hell' is always the right decision?" - Marilyn Monroe

lawgroupie

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2004, 11:22:32 AM »
It sounds as if the test consists mainly of fact patterns, right?

1L Story

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2004, 01:30:51 PM »
First, having to know case names varies by professor.  I have two that require case names on the exam:  Torts and Civ Pro.  Thus, I needed outlines that included black letter law and case names.  I worked on my own, but just ran out of time.  I got some great ones a friend recommended on ebay though.  Try this link if you want to see it:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=3144&item=3942399605&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

edythec

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2004, 01:51:15 PM »
All of my information is based on last years exams for Mr. Davidson's Tort Class.  The exam consisted of almost 100% fact patterns.  He will draft a rather large fact pattern that contains multiple torts.  Then he will ask several questions concerning the fact pattern.  There are 4 to 6 answers for each question.  The difficulty is that of the answers only one maybe two are readily identifiable as being wrong.  All the other answers appear to either be correct or equally correct.  You have to pick out which answer is the most right or the least wrong.  The best advice I can give you is to know your tort elements, understand the elements and at test time, trust your instincts.
"Ever notice that 'What the hell' is always the right decision?" - Marilyn Monroe

Dicta

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #16 on: November 19, 2004, 02:49:38 PM »
All right, that is helpful! I guess we should ask for extra credit...is there anything else we should ask?
Did you use mneumonics for elements?
Susan
Until you go too far, you will never know how far you can go.
TS Eliot (poorly paraphrased by myself)

edythec

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #17 on: November 19, 2004, 03:21:15 PM »
I know this is going to sound crazy, but I don't remember if I used mnemonics in Torts!  I know I did in Contracts - I still remember MY LEGS (statute of Frauds).  In torts, trust your instincts.  Don't go back once you have answered the questions!  Everybody I have talked to says the ones they changed they got wrong.  Don't get too freaked out, just get your outline made and read it until it makes you swear you will throw up if you have to read it again, then read it again.  Same concept for Contracts, but contracts is mostly essay with just 3 or 4 multiple choice.
"Ever notice that 'What the hell' is always the right decision?" - Marilyn Monroe

Dicta

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2004, 10:26:30 PM »
I do really well with mnemonics.
There is just sooo much to Torts.
I did some of the Barbri fact patterns this weekend. You are right, it's definitely best to go with the first answer! Do you remember how many questions there were?
Susan
Until you go too far, you will never know how far you can go.
TS Eliot (poorly paraphrased by myself)

lawgroupie

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Re: Outlining Torts
« Reply #19 on: November 22, 2004, 12:24:21 PM »
Jeff,

I tried to download flashlaw and it is not free. Where did you get your version? I went to flashlaw.com, and they said you had to buy as aspen publication first, and the cost is several hundred dollars.