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Author Topic: The Truths and Myths of Law School...  (Read 7755 times)

cbethun1

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2004, 11:23:19 AM »
CBethun1: I went to Georgia Tech for undergrad and currently attend law school at Georgia State.

GA Tech huh?  You guys stole that game from us this year.  >:( ...lol

Anyways, what type of numbers got you into GA State?  I sort of want to go to law school in GA but I'm not sure yet. 

sarahz

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2004, 12:20:28 PM »
Maybe its just me, but my undergrad school schedule + work + other activites = a minimum of a 50 hour weeks-often more like 70!  Thats prob. why i feel like this isnt taking up that much time.  I'm not just trying to get by...i do all the homework/studying that i feel is necessary but once i reach a point where i feel comfortable with the material, i'm not going to keep studying just for the sake of saying I spend 6 hours (or whatever) a day studying.  Each day is different & each person studies differently...I've seen people who take an hour to read 15 pages and people who read 15 pages in 20 minutes...But thats the point...there is this misperception that if people arent studying a million hours a night they are just "getting by"-people should be aware that not everyone needs the same amount of studying to do well...

Lavia

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #22 on: September 19, 2004, 12:42:31 PM »
I go to Georgia State law school too! I'm a 1L.

Lavia

CBethun1: I went to Georgia Tech for undergrad and currently attend law school at Georgia State.

squarre

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #23 on: September 19, 2004, 04:42:15 PM »
Cbethun1:  My undergrad GPA (somewhere close to 3.14 or so) wasn't great, partly due to slacking at times and partly due to 2 semesters that make law school look like a breeze.  On the lsat I got a 164.  Georgia State is actually the only place I applied this year because of my upcoming wedding so I can't really give you any personal info on other Georgia schools.  I do know a friend of mine's girlfriend got into to UGA with a 3.4 from Tech and 162 LSAT.

vw515

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #24 on: September 19, 2004, 04:56:10 PM »
Thank you Dean.

To anyone reading this thinking of coming to school or who is still trying to get comfortable remeber this:
Everyone studies differently
The key is understanding what you read not getting through the reading as fast as possible
I read Harry Potter The last one in a day and a half. Constitutional law takes me about an hour for ten pages on some days.
Study hard now dont slack off because the slackers will be in the jobs that dont pay school loans and those of us that put our education will God willing be at the top law firms in NY Cal.and Chicago remember that.
This is your career not like undergrad where you still were able to go another step foward if you screw up.
Some jobs wont even look at you if you are not in the top 10%.
Good luck fellow 1L's

disgruntled1L

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2004, 08:47:25 PM »
"This is your career not like undergrad where you still were able to go another step foward if you screw up.
Some jobs wont even look at you if you are not in the top 10%. "

this is true but...in my experience and from the experiences of others i have known who have already gone through LS...what you do while your in law school counts just as much...i'll risk a slightly lower grade to get something published or to be on a journal...classes are great but they are in no way a reliable indicator for your true ability.  Being able to say– yes i have good grades, maybe not the best, but i've had 3 articles published...that shows what you can do! 

So unless you want to make yourself prematurely gray at some top 10 slave driving firm...make sure to be involved and not make reading your entire life!!!!

eee

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #26 on: September 19, 2004, 09:41:19 PM »
for those of you who have the time (and, even those who dont!), i HIGHLY recommend reading Dean Tonsing's book, 1000 Days to the Bar But the Practice of law Begins Now ... it is by far the best book that's been written on how to survive, and excel in law school. its a pretty quick read (only 180 pages) but its really top notch. it pretty much covers every question you’ve ever had about law school... from briefing to outlining to time management to taking notes… so far it has been my bible in law school.  Having read it a few times this summer I can easily say that I am MUCH more prepared than the vast majority of my section.



Notice that (above) you find some law students are studying just a few hours each week – others are studying an extraordinary amount.  That’s  because they have different objectives and vastly different abilities, aptitudes, reading speeds, and study methods.

Because most law students are bright individuals, many can “get by” or even do “well” with a minimal amount of studying (“minimal” being a relative term). 

However, if you view law school as the beginning of your career as a lawyer, are you willing to settle for “getting by?”  I encourage students to perform at their personal best levels, preparing for the days when they will be representing clients whose freedom, lives, fortunes and families may well be at stake.  Start practicing now to be the kind of lawyer you would hire if you needed a lawyer. 

How does this translate into time spent studying?  You’ll read posts in this forum suggesting that studying quite a bit will cut down on those other essential parts of life that keep us happy, well-rounded, and psychologically well-nourished.  Think about this: if you are going to engage in a career as a lawyer, are you embarking on a career that will gobble up your life and not allow you to be happy? 

You see, a light week for most attorneys is in the neighborhood of sixty hours.  Why not devote as much time to law now as you will when you enter the professional practice?  Practice managing your time (during law school) in such a way that you are able to devote considerable time to your law practice, and still have as much time as you need to lead a well-balance life, packed with social opportunities, exercise, and fun – maintaining your psychological and spiritual health at the highest levels. Then, when you begin your professional practice – about 1000 days from the first semester of law school – you will be very experienced at balancing law and life.

Consider this:  14 hours in class; 42 hours outside of class (3 hours for every class hour). That adds up to 56 hours – one-third of the 168 hours we all have in each week.  If you sleep as much as 8 hours each night (7 X 8 = 56), that leaves you with 56 hours to attend to your personal health and well being, to socialize, to cook gourmet meals, to attend church, to play tennis, to fold the laundry, to do all those other things that make life worthwhile.

If you spend substantially more time than this, you run the risk of burning out, ruining your health, giving in to the stresses we all (lawyers and law students) face, and – therefore – doing less than your personal best. 

If you spend substantially less time than this, you probably won’t be attending to all the essential elements of high-level study and exam prep: reading, briefing, attending every class, taking notes, transforming your notes, creating course summaries (“outlines”), developing flow charts, and answering practice hypotheticals in writing.

For an in-depth discussion of how much time to spend studying, and how to use that time most efficiently, go to your law library and find the September issue of Student Lawyer, the ABA Law Student Division publication.  The cover article I wrote covers this whole topic, and provides a step-by-step method for allocating your time.  There you will find a sample of how a student can determine precisely how much time to spend studying each day.

If you have further questions about this, feel free to e-mail me.



dgatl

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #27 on: September 19, 2004, 09:44:03 PM »
I go to Georgia State law school too! I'm a 1L.

Lavia

CBethun1: I went to Georgia Tech for undergrad and currently attend law school at Georgia State.

Hey ATLANTA people!  I'm not at Georgia State... but i'm right down the street (albeit a long ass drive in this traffic) at Emory.  All my friends in this town are Ga Tech kids, so we may have even partied together.  How is GSU?  Do you all live in midtown or commute from other places?

vw515

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #28 on: September 20, 2004, 12:02:00 AM »
I agree about law review but would add Moot court and maybe even student government president or vice president. Forgot to put those in. I am involved in several national organizations. Can only do Law review or Moot court second year so I dont have that down as a priority but I am taking on leadership roles in national orginizations which my old boss told me is something he looks at on resumes Good Luck fellow 1L's ;D

SLJ0720

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Re: The Truths and Myths of Law School...
« Reply #29 on: September 24, 2004, 09:13:13 PM »
I am a IL and so far this is what my typical days are like:

Get up usually at 6:30 or 7:00
Arrive at school around 8:00
Study before first class until 9:00
Class 9:00 to 9:50
Study 10:00 to 11:00 until next class
Class 11:00 to 11:50
Study 12:00 to 1:00 until next class
Class 1:00 to 1:50
Get home around 2:15
Eat, watch TV 'til about 3:30
Study 3:30 to about 12:00, but take various breaks throughout evening, such as an hour for dinner, half-hour or so to talk to boyfriend on phone, usually take 20 minute break after I finish up the work for one subject.  

I usually don't do much on Friday nights because I am so tired, but I do study on Sat. and Sun.  It varies depending on how much I have to do for Monday, but I would say I spend about 5 hours each day, sometimes more on Sun. if I didn't get as much done on Sat.