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Author Topic: Do u get called on once or more than once???  (Read 48633 times)

basha

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Re: Do u get called on once or more than once???
« Reply #100 on: January 15, 2008, 05:05:38 PM »
hahaha, you're so funny, leger! ;)
The severity of the itch is proportional to the reach.

aXXo

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Re: Do u get called on once or more than once???
« Reply #101 on: January 18, 2008, 11:44:01 AM »
Every single time I got called on in class, I got PWNED because I wasn't paying any attention.  Several times I bet I got called on because it was clear that I was the only kid playing online poker, slouched in the back row.  Plus I don't brief. 

LVP

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Re: Do u get called on once or more than once???
« Reply #102 on: February 22, 2008, 10:55:42 PM »
Every single time I got called on in class, I got PWNED because I wasn't paying any attention.  Several times I bet I got called on because it was clear that I was the only kid playing online poker, slouched in the back row.  Plus I don't brief. 
It's okay, at least you realized you got called on.  1L Fall one guy was so engrossed in his IM/online poker/fantasy football/whatever he was doing that he didn't even realize the professor was saying his name.  He repeated himself a couple of times, and everybody was staring at the kid, but the kid was oblivious.

I don't remember what happened next - I think the prof just called on someone else and moved on.
Pizza is the reward, death is the risk.

#

crazymofo

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Re: Do u get called on once or more than once???
« Reply #103 on: February 22, 2008, 11:11:13 PM »
Every single time I got called on in class, I got PWNED because I wasn't paying any attention.  Several times I bet I got called on because it was clear that I was the only kid playing online poker, slouched in the back row.  Plus I don't brief. 
It's okay, at least you realized you got called on.  1L Fall one guy was so engrossed in his IM/online poker/fantasy football/whatever he was doing that he didn't even realize the professor was saying his name.  He repeated himself a couple of times, and everybody was staring at the kid, but the kid was oblivious.

I don't remember what happened next - I think the prof just called on someone else and moved on.

lmfao.  So that's the secret. 

PixyLaw

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Re: Do u get called on once or more than once???
« Reply #104 on: February 23, 2008, 10:27:44 AM »
...and the next day you will plagerize a Vandy Professor's Law Review article and post it on a law school discussion board without attributing the true author's work  ;)

Patrick J. Schiltz, On Being a Happy, Healthy, and Ethical Member of an Unhappy,Unhealthy, and Unethical Profession, 52 Vand. L. Rev. 871, 917 (1999)



leave your name off the seating chart - u'll never get called on - profs rarely reference the seating chart against the class roster


One day, not too long after you start practicing law, you will sit down at the end of a long, tiring day, and you just won't have much to show for your efforts in terms of billable hours. It will be near the end of the month. You will know that all of the partners will be looking at your monthly time report in a few days, so what you'll do is pad your time sheet just a bit. Maybe you will bill a client for 90 min for a task that really took you only 60 min to perform. However, you will promise yourself that you will repay the client at the first opportunity by doing 30 min of work for the client for "free." In this way, you will be "borrowing," not "stealing." And then what will happen is that it will become easier and easier to take these little loans against future work. And then, after a while, you will stop paying back these little loans. You will convince yourself that, although you billed for 90 min and spent only 60 min on the project, you did such good work that your client should pay a bit more for it. After all, your billing rate is awfully low, and your client is awfully rich.

And then you will pad more and more -- every 2 min telephone conversation will go down on the sheet as 10 min, every 3 hrs research project will go down with an extra quarter hr or so. You will continue to rationalize your dishonesty to yourself in various ways until one day you stop doing even that. And, before long -- it won't take you much more than 3-4 years -- you will be stealing from your clients almost every day, and you won't even notice it. You know what? You will also likely become a liar. A deadline will come up one day, and, for reasons that are entirely your fault, you will not be able to meet it. So you will call your senior partner or your client and make up a white lie for why you missed the deadline. And then you will get busy and a partner will ask whether you proofread a lengthy prospectus and you will say yes, even though you didn't. And then you will be drafting a brief and you will quote language from a Supreme Court opinion even though you will know that, when read in context, the language does not remotely suggest what you are implying it suggests. And then, in preparing a client for a deposition, you will help the client to formulate an answer to a difficult question that will likely be asked -- an answer that will be "legally accurate" but that will mislead your opponent. And then you will be reading through a big box of your client's documents -- a box that has not been opened in 20 years -- and you will find a document that would hurt your client's case, but that no one except you knows exists, and you will simply "forget" to produce it in response to your opponent's discovery requests.

Do you see what will happen? After a couple years of this, you won't even notice that you are lying and cheating and stealing every day that you practice law. None of these things will seem like a big deal in itself -- an extra 15 minutes added to a time sheet here, a little white lie to cover a missed deadline there. But, after a while, your entire frame of reference will change. You will still be making dozens of quick, instinctive decisions every day, but those decisions, instead of reflecting the notions of right and wrong by which you conduct your personal life, will instead reflect the set of values by which you will conduct your professional life -- a set of values that embodies not what is right or wrong, but what is profitable, and what you can get away with. The system will have succeeded in replacing your values with the system's values, and the system will be profiting as a result.

It is true that not every lawyer knowingly and blatantly lies on his time sheets. But there is a reason why padding time sheets has been called "a silent epidemic." Lots of lawyers pad time sheets in ways that are less obviously dishonest and more socially accepted. For example, a lawyer who needs to fly from L.A. to N.Y. for one client may do the work of another client during the 5-hr flight, and bill both clients 5 hrs -- the first for 5 hours of travel, the second for 5 hours of work. Another common practice is for lawyers not to fill out their time sheets until the end of the day - -or end of the week -- or even end of the month. When a lawyer sits down on July 31 and tries to remember how much time she devoted to a client's work on July 9, 272 it is only natural that she will underestimate the amount of time wasted on coffee breaks and personal phone calls and overestimate the amount of time devoted to the client's work. Another widely accepted way of padding time sheets is to bill in minimum increments of, say, .25 hours or .30 hours. This permits the enterprising lawyer to engage in four 2-min phone calls and bill 1 hour.

Ouch!

charming, so

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Re: Pictures Catalog Thing,,
« Reply #105 on: April 09, 2012, 04:33:15 PM »
I never said all profs use seating charts.  FWIW, every one of mine does, and they have our student ID pics on there as well.  I've heard of many other schools that have seating charts, and more and more with pics included after a few weeks of classes.

jc, the OP on top says his hypo would work in case the non-responding student would be taking a class not with his section ... which means that the professor would not have his picture in the section catalog

However, I don't think it's a viable idea for the reason that the professor can examine the attendance sheet to see if the student he called on was present but did not respond or he was really absent that day.

This would not work thou if you are kinda "conspicuous" or your professor has a crush on you ... ;)


Oh boy, someone has a crush on oneself!
The severity of the itch is proportional to the reach.

Stephanie K.

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Re: Der Besuch der Alten Dame
« Reply #106 on: April 12, 2012, 08:16:20 PM »
Quote


"The Visit of the Old Lady" is a 1956 tragicomedy by the Swiss dramatist Friedrich Dürrenmatt. The location of the drama is Gúllen, a once flourishing small town that lost its ancient bloom when its industrial plants closed down and business took a plunge. The forgotten, poverty-stricken inhabitants of Gúllen are by now used to a modest life, spending the major part of their days reminiscing about better times, until one day the arrival of the "Old Lady" alters the Gúlleners' existence at a stroke. Claire Zachanassian, a native of Gúllen whose profitable marriages to oil magnates, artists and industrialists have made her extremely rich, and her strange court consisting of two blind servants, two former gangsters, a butler and Husband Number 7, are met with sincere enthusiasm by the citizens of Gúllen at the railway station. And they are not disappointed. Claire promises to donate a billion to the township on one condition - Ill, a merchant of Gúllen, must be killed. In years gone by, Ill had a love affair with Claire. Claire became pregnant and claimed that Ill was the father. But with the help of two friends - now her two blind servants - Ill was able to escape responsibility.



Claire had to leave Gúllen and live as a prostitute, until she met her first rich husband. The stipulated murder is a planned revenge against Ill and the Gúllen inhabitants. In the course of time, Claire has acquired the industrial plants and the entire town, in order to ruin them. The first reaction of the Gúllen citizens is water-tight solidarity with Ill, but gradually it begins to spring leaks. Their opinions change from "poor soul, guilty of a childhood misdemeanor" to "irresponsible, immoral evil-doer". At the same time, the people of Gúllen indulge in new, luxury goods — on credit — represented by new, yellow shoes, which are soon worn by all citizens, including even police officers and the mayor. Even his own family are not spared the attraction of increasing lucre. His wife buys a fur coat, his son a car, and his daughter takes lessons in tennis. Only the teacher evokes the humanist tradition, and attempts, at first timidly, to interpose himself before the death sentence that has, by now, come to be seen as immutable. In the end, even Ill accepts his fate. In a climactic town gathering, Ill receives his sentence, which is immediately carried out by the people of Gúllen.

The fundamental underlying point of the play is that money can allure people's minds, especially those weakly determined. It also notices how money creates the power to control the world around. As the arrival of Claire Zachanassian shows, the promise of money can lead people to hate and even murder. It can pervert the course of justice, and even turn the local teacher, who is one of the few who manage to warn Alfred Ill of his impending doom. The teacher is a self-declared humanist, and his moral collapse, as well as that of the priest, demonstrates the power of money to overcome both religious and secular morality. It suggests that greed can turn anyone.The usage of this theme also develops around the main idea of "money-hungry".

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=3004098.msg5225273#msg5225273



This yellow thing - very creative on the part of the Durrenmatt - I mean, you can just imagine smth like that happening for real!