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Author Topic: NW California?  (Read 6060 times)

Nontradstudent

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NW California?
« on: August 21, 2004, 02:09:05 PM »
Hi all,

I'm looking for people who attend or have attended NWCU law school. I am  enrolling in a distance learning JD program to complement my nursing career and political activism. Does anybody here have any tips on the first year? 

David550

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2004, 07:12:40 PM »
I attend NWCU and passed the BB on my first attempt. I investigated all the available schools and chose NWCU. I believe their online program is the best.

Good luck,
David550

Vincent

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2004, 09:24:17 PM »
I enrolled in NWCU in July 2004. Don't let anyone fool you. If you wish to be sucessful in anything (whatever it may be), you need the committment and dedication. Correspondence law school is no different. The bottom line: invest the time, effort, and resources to suceed!!

law543

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2004, 02:09:14 PM »
I enrolled in NWCU in July 2004. Don't let anyone fool you. If you wish to be sucessful in anything (whatever it may be), you need the committment and dedication. Correspondence law school is no different. The bottom line: invest the time, effort, and resources to suceed!!

I agree. I have recently enrolled...and just being disciplined enough to manage my time well to be sure the reading gets done is work. Thankfully I've always been a motivated person...because you have almost zero accountibility with DL. If you don't do the work...nobody is going to scream at you...you just suffer academically.

As an undergrad I had an easy time...the reading was a breeze...and most of the work was a joke. As an aside...I used to hate how each professor would treat a new class as if they had never received instructions on how to do a research paper or do a presentation or some other project. It really tries your patience.

I enjoy school so much, though, it is not even an issue with me. My company pays my tuition at NW...and I will work as counsel for the company once I pass the bar.

I was drawn to NW because of the wonderful staff...they really treated me well when I visited and I could tell they care very much about the quality of education...and about YOU as a student. I was going to choose Concord...but they were shits to me on the phone. They are a little too haughty for DL educators, IMHO. You'd think they think they are the online equivilent to Harvard or something. Barf.

law542

chaser

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2004, 01:11:03 PM »
The advantages of NWCU over traditional are (in my subjective opinion):

1) You must post your assignments on discussion boards, where the whole school can see them.  In regular school, if you mess up sometimes only the teacher sees it.  This forces you to stick your neck out there.

2) You can watch lectures in Realtime as many times as you want, and rewind lectures to the point where you started to lose or couldn't keep up with what the professor was saying.

3) You get a set of CD's which contain verbal class outlines, and if you have a relatively long commute or drive a lot, you can play them over and over again in your car.  The only way to remember some of law's archaic and esoteric terms is through repetition and rote memorization.

4) They have internet chats that are supervised by a professor.  I haven't participated in one yet, but they sound pretty good.

The downside, of course, is that "real" lawyers have to argue verbally, and hold their ground verbally, and you can't get any of that through DL.

That's why I'm trying to start a study group, but I'm not having much luck.

Till then, I'll have to live with that down side.
"Civilization is the process of reducing the infinite to the finite."  Oliver Wendell Holmes

sc017545

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2005, 07:48:13 PM »
I know that the school is not accredited, so what good is it then?  I am interested in the LLM program, and want to know what avenues are available for the program's graduate.  I am not even a Cali resident.  Does anyone know what kinds of companies will hire graduates of the LLM progam, especially seeing that I do not even have a JD, just a bachelor's degree in marketing?

law543

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2005, 06:22:33 PM »
The advantages of NWCU over traditional are (in my subjective opinion):

1) You must post your assignments on discussion boards, where the whole school can see them.  In regular school, if you mess up sometimes only the teacher sees it.  This forces you to stick your neck out there.

2) You can watch lectures in Realtime as many times as you want, and rewind lectures to the point where you started to lose or couldn't keep up with what the professor was saying.

3) You get a set of CD's which contain verbal class outlines, and if you have a relatively long commute or drive a lot, you can play them over and over again in your car.  The only way to remember some of law's archaic and esoteric terms is through repetition and rote memorization.

4) They have internet chats that are supervised by a professor.  I haven't participated in one yet, but they sound pretty good.

The downside, of course, is that "real" lawyers have to argue verbally, and hold their ground verbally, and you can't get any of that through DL.

That's why I'm trying to start a study group, but I'm not having much luck.

Till then, I'll have to live with that down side.

I live in San Diego...would your study group be near that part of California? I am a 1L at NWCU.

Law543

sc017545

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2005, 01:38:01 PM »
Would you recommend the JD or LLM program for students who are interested in the law program at NWCU

chaser

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2005, 04:55:36 PM »
Sorry, I haven't looked at this page for a long time and didn't mean to be rude not responding.

I am in Atlanta, GA. 

I took the NWCU Mock bar in June, and it was a wonderful experience!  The school really goes all out.

I have also participated in the Chats since I posted, and you pretty much get the Socratic experience through that--you take a position, and you have to defend it, etc.

Most of the professors at NWCU got LL.M.'s at NWCU, and they are all very good lawyers.

This is just personal advice--but I would get an LL.M. from a brick-and-mortar if at all possible--preferably one that is ABA certified. 

Having said that, everyone I know who got an LL.M. from NWCU is working as a lawyer, so there must be some merit to it.

I think the bulk of the LL.M. experience is writing your thesis--I could be wrong.  If I am correct, then I think it is not so much where you go, but can you WRITE???

Thanks, and sorry again about the long delay in answer.
"Civilization is the process of reducing the infinite to the finite."  Oliver Wendell Holmes

Kehinde

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Re: NW California?
« Reply #9 on: September 16, 2005, 02:49:39 PM »
1) You must post your assignments on discussion boards, where the whole school can see them.  In regular school, if you mess up sometimes only the teacher sees it.  This forces you to stick your neck out there.

2) You can watch lectures in Realtime as many times as you want, and rewind lectures to the point where you started to lose or couldn't keep up with what the professor was saying.

I was browsing through NWCULAW and wondered if there was a fee they charged to access the Blackboard.  Or is one automatically signed in once they're accepted?

Also, are the lectures to watch limited to a set number per year or is it sort of like a lecture library where you can pick and choose whatever you want to watch? Thanks.
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