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Author Topic: 1L - First Brief  (Read 7135 times)

duma

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Re: 1L - First Brief
« Reply #30 on: September 01, 2004, 02:45:01 PM »
I have done the combination of book breifing and actually writing up the brief. I think that this is affective. I have everything I need for class right before me. I only type out the very important details that I will need to study.

After class, I add in my notes as to what the Prof thought was important. This is to help my outline, and try and decrease placing un-stressed facts into my brief.
The net affect after one week, I have more time to understand the case, and I have spent less time just typing (more time).

Just to be specific on details, the book has everything that you would type out (duh), I only mark them for quick access when I am asked a question. I use a different color highlighter to hit each point (Fact, Holding, Issue, etc) and I write in the margin how one relates to the other.

Example, if I have a Minor Deduction by the court, I mark it as such. I than will mark the part of facts they apply the minor deduction to.

Anyway, so far it is working for me, and I am less stressed about the time of reading and typing out the brief.

jeffjoe

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Re: 1L - First Brief
« Reply #31 on: September 01, 2004, 02:55:18 PM »
You only type up the important points that you need for study....

I thought that's what the brief was supposed to be.

Am I missing a point?

I have done the combination of book breifing and actually writing up the brief. I think that this is affective. I have everything I need for class right before me. I only type out the very important details that I will need to study.

After class, I add in my notes as to what the Prof thought was important. This is to help my outline, and try and decrease placing un-stressed facts into my brief.
The net affect after one week, I have more time to understand the case, and I have spent less time just typing (more time).

Just to be specific on details, the book has everything that you would type out (duh), I only mark them for quick access when I am asked a question. I use a different color highlighter to hit each point (Fact, Holding, Issue, etc) and I write in the margin how one relates to the other.

Example, if I have a Minor Deduction by the court, I mark it as such. I than will mark the part of facts they apply the minor deduction to.

Anyway, so far it is working for me, and I am less stressed about the time of reading and typing out the brief.
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duma

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Re: 1L - First Brief
« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2004, 12:35:52 AM »
You only type up the important points that you need for study....

I thought that's what the brief was supposed to be.

Am I missing a point?

The citation, statement of the case, SOME rational, SOME deduction, etc, IMO are not essential come exam time. My brief used to go for two to three pages, I have it down to one now. I use StoreLaw to combine my notes from class and info from my breif to make a key point for the case. I also add info from the book that the prof pointed out.
After the completion of a topic, I combine all the information in the Key point into the topic key point. I have started to think of this as a way of doing a short outline (topic key points), mid-range outline (topic key pionts and case key points), and finally the large outline (briefs, keypoints of the case, and topic key points).
I no longer see the need for a citation, statement, various facts, etc when they are not making the cut into any keypoint.

BennyQ

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Re: 1L - First Brief
« Reply #33 on: September 05, 2004, 02:48:11 AM »
I never really thought the point of a brief was class use.  Sure it can help when you need to recite on a case, but if you just recently read the material you shouldn't really NEED it.  I have really found the briefs to be beneficial when it is finals-time.  Here is my study-tip to 1L's: before your final, go through each brief.  Read only the facts you have written.  From the facts alone(if you have chosen them wisely), you should be able to recognize the issue AND the analysis the under the black-letter law.  In all likelihood, this will be the single most important skill on any final exam you will take.

jeffjoe

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Re: 1L - First Brief
« Reply #34 on: September 11, 2004, 05:44:42 PM »
My experience has been the opposite, so far.  Keep in mind I've just been in law school for a few weeks and I am in a night program.  I have to do my reading and briefs on the weekend ususally.  By the time I get to class, I don't remember anything about the cases.  I'd be lost without my briefs.

I never really thought the point of a brief was class use.  Sure it can help when you need to recite on a case, but if you just recently read the material you shouldn't really NEED it.  I have really found the briefs to be beneficial when it is finals-time.  Here is my study-tip to 1L's: before your final, go through each brief.  Read only the facts you have written.  From the facts alone(if you have chosen them wisely), you should be able to recognize the issue AND the analysis the under the black-letter law.  In all likelihood, this will be the single most important skill on any final exam you will take.
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lawgirl

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Re: 1L - First Brief
« Reply #35 on: September 11, 2004, 09:48:42 PM »
I use my briefs for in-class prep. We normally have too many cases to remember them all of the top of my head during the next week, so I use them there. I incorporate them (condensed form) later into my outline.