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Author Topic: anyone ever transferred out of cooley?  (Read 7456 times)

NeedOut

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Re: anyone ever transferred out of cooley?
« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2005, 12:34:44 PM »
just because i have seen so many of these posts i will reply

i started cooley in jan/05, 7 months ago
i had a 159 lsat and got a 75% tuition deferrment, so i am paying 6K a year instaed of 24K, which is why i though it was so great (i am not from around here so i didnt know about most of the cooley bashing)

anyways, i took 5 credits and did well, A in Con law, A- in torts and crim law, B in property, and B- in contracts. overall 3.3 gpa. not bad.
i dont know about other schools, but i had 5 exams in 6 days and it sucked, my last two exams were property and contracts and they were my lowest marks so go figure.


80% of the profs are good, but 25% of the class shouldnt be in law school. there are definatly slackers who get weeded out through the year. if i remember correctly, 15% of students wash out, and another 15% transfer the first year. thus top and bottom students leave so it all works out.

i am pretty smart, not genius, but definately as good as any sucessful lawyer out there in practice. i had no intention of being a lawyer when i took the lsat, and only studied a book for a few weeks before i took it. in retrospect i could probobly gotten low 160s if i was more serious 3 years ago and took prep courses and all that *&^%. but my plan was to go into academic research, and law did not appeal to me then. but i ended up not getting into my masters program, so i opted for something different.

i really think i am top 5 in my class of 100. now i am smart, and i worked really, really hard, but something tells me there too many people who are not naturally smart, and just making it by through plowing through and using every study aid known to man. i dont use any study aid at all. but i want to be in a place where everyone has a little bit of natural smarts and you are inspired by the people around you.

so i transferred to michigan state and am starting in sept 05
thier intellectual property program is very well regarded according to those stupid rankings i hate, and i think i read that an IP lawyer in Michigan on average makes 90K, that pretty good money for michign and you can live a good life.


so yes, you can transfer out. i could have applied to better ranked schools then MSU for thier JD rankings, but my plan is to do an IP LLM, so that is what i am aiming for. plus i like MSU. plus i dont put too much stock in all this ranking *&^%.the quality of life indicator for most people between teh ages of 25-75 has to do with much much more then the ego ranking of your school. there are alot of people living crappy lives out there who are drs and laywers and such.


anyways, if any future cooley students have any specific questions about how to do well or transfer or *&^%, post em and i will try to reply

sirriff






how'd you do that? I asked MSU if they would do that for me (i'm in the same situation) and they said no, try in the spring because they wanted more grades

chonghyuk78

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Re: anyone ever transferred out of cooley?
« Reply #21 on: September 04, 2005, 08:53:39 PM »
There was a post in one of the boards where a Cooley student (4.0 GPA) transferred into Harvard Law, so I guess anything's possible if you want it bad enough.

voss749

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Re: anyone ever transferred out of cooley?
« Reply #22 on: November 21, 2005, 09:47:00 AM »
The attritrion rate from cooley in the first two years is close to 50%
Probably 25% of those people should never have been at law school.
 
The other 25% could have succeeded at a different law school with more
academic support.
 
Cooley is hard and not in a good way.

Those guys who had 3.1 GPAs and above GPAS at cooley
would be successful at ANY law school. The guy
with the 3.8 at cooley probably should have gotten
LSAT coaching and could have gotten into a better law school