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Author Topic: Kaplan LSAT course  (Read 2237 times)

Jrtzsweetie

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Kaplan LSAT course
« on: June 01, 2004, 10:06:44 AM »
Hi guys,
  I have a question and I'd gladly appreciate any advice/feedback I can get.  I'm thinking of taking the Kaplan LSAT prep course this July to help boost my LSAT score, but I've heard mixed reviews about the course - some say it's good and some say it's not worth the money, just put in the time and effort yourself.  Now I'm not too sure if I should go ahead and take the class.  Any advice/feedback?   Thanks guys...  :)

HarvardBound

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2004, 12:31:28 PM »
I would do it. I'm signed up for the Kaplan tutor and the class.  My first tutoring session helped a lot and it was just an intro session.  TRUST ME. A CLASS AND IF YOU CAN, A TUTOR MAKES A DIFFERENCE.  EVEN IF YOU HAVE TO PUT IT ON A CREDIT CARD, IT'S WORTH IT.  REMEMBER THAT THE LSAT REALISTICALLY CAN ONLY BE TAKEN ONCE.  MOST SCHOOLS AVERAGE THE SCORES SO IT'S ONLY WORTH IT TO TAKE IT ONE TIME.  DO WHAT IT TAKES TO GET THE HIGHEST SCORE POSSIBLE. 

Jrtzsweetie

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2004, 11:45:37 AM »
Thank you  :)  You're right - I should do whatever's possible to get a higher score.  It's just that I don't want to essentially waste my money, but if I don't take the class, I may regret it later.  Thanks!   :D

antiparasite

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2004, 12:27:54 PM »


 I can only STRONGLY agree with what Harvardbound is saying. I shot my LSAT scores to the roof after a prolonged customized Kaplan. the great thing with Kaplan is that they genuinely CARE about your success, since their reputation (and future customer base) hinges entirely on standardized testing..

    Don't go for the LSAT unless you feel entirely ready (relatively speaking). Take it once, rock it and get it over with..
 Good luck, you can surely do it :)

             -J-

laurel131

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2004, 02:49:37 PM »
I'd say to take the course - but with reserve. I took the Kaplan LSAT course last September *for the october LSAT* and my teacher for the course was a medical student. Granted, she obviously took a LSAT ..but never took the offical one, so she was clueless as to how the test is administered. She often found herself saying "i dunno" to most questions. Just make sure you get a good teacher for the course. I think I would have had a larger benefitfrom the course if I had a better teacher.

Good luck.

Jrtzsweetie

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2004, 03:23:32 PM »
Thanks a lot guys.  I really appreciate the advice.  Do you remember what book you used for the class?   

sarahz

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2004, 03:50:29 PM »
Dont bother with the lsat course!  I spent the money on it and learned NOTHING!  The classes are taught to the lowest intelligence level in the class-which in my case was a group of 40 yr old women who where hopeless.  The only thing the class is good for is forcing you to practice and take full length tests.  But as far as i'm concerned these are things that you can motivate yourself to do at home.  After the Kaplan class i took the LSATs and got a 150...i decided to study on my own and the second time got a 164!!

What made the difference-the LSAC official test books!!!!  Go buy yourself 10-12 tests and it will be all you need.  I found out after that LSAC is the only organization that can actually re-publish old test exactly as they were given, Kaplan, Princeton Review and the rest are actually more of an "inspired by the LSATs" type program/books.

Force yourself to study by doing one or two full length test a week from begining to end. (if you cant self motivate to do this, consider rethinking law school because it will be three years of self-motivated studying!)  By the time you take the test the timing part wont be a problem, you'll have a grasp on what is going to be asked and your brain wont start freezing from over use by the end of the 3rd section!

musicalone8123

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2004, 06:56:22 PM »
Why are you only considering Kaplan, though? I took Kaplan, but I believe there are better options.

If you're willing to put in the work with Kaplan, though, then your score will definitely increase. But what I took away from Kaplan, I could have gotten on my own...and could have gotten that and THEN some with other courses like Testmasters. I have had to self-study after Kaplan to get my score where I want it to be (if you want to get a 150-something, Kaplan will take you there...but probably not higher).

And I haven't studied my Kaplan materials in a long time because the Home Study Book, I realized, has fake LSAT questions in it...which I feel didn't hurt when my score was low but definitely doesn't help now that my score is higher and I know pretty well what the REAL questions are like! The Lesson Book has real questions in it, but the amount of questions in that book aren't enough. Then I got a Kaplan store book and found that the techniques the course teaches are basically the same as in their store book...DEFINITELY makes the course not worth the money.

I don't agree the classes are taught to the lowest intelligence level, but that might depend on where you take it. I usually felt like I was actually the only person in the class who understood my Kaplan instructor. The other students seemed to be confused all the time and, not to sound pretentious, but I went to better schools (high school AND college) than all those people and, thus, was probably more educated/intelligent. Consequently, the "lowest intelligent" people ended up really feeling like the class was a waste of time, money and didn't feel like the instructor was any good/knew what he was talking about--some even quit coming--while I was the only one saying decent things about it.

Do with this info what you may, but I really feel like you'd be better off either taking another prep course, depending on what your score goal is, or studying on your own by forcing yourself to take real practice tests under strict realistic conditions and availing yourself of some of the best study guides on the market (Master the LSAT, Logic Games Bible). Oh, and...I believe you will need MORE than 10-12 tests, also! Get both "10 Actual..." books, plus the newest book of 10 coming out and the newer tests that book doesn't include (I believe 39-43).

Good luck, and feel free to e-mail me with any specific questions (musicalone8123@yahoo.com)

schwing

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2004, 07:12:36 PM »
I took the Kaplan course. It cost about $1,000.00. I think it was helpful because I did more preparation than I would have done on my own. I'm not so sure the instruction itself was all that helpful. Kaplan gives you a practice LSAT the first day of the course to see where you score and if you have any glaring weaknesses. It's called a "diagnostic" LSAT. My Kaplan diagnostic score was 159 and my offical LSAT score was the same: 159. So does that mean Kaplan's course was a waste of money? No. After all, on the day of the actual LSAT I still got the 159. But it's true with a score like that you're not getting in to a top school. You should take some course, Kaplan, PowerScore, Princeton Review, etc. Take the best course and the most personalized instruction you can afford. Work as hard as you can and do as many practice exams as you can. Work especially on the Logic Games. There is a huge difference in your performance under pressure as opposed to when you have all the time in the world to figure out a question. Take the practice exams under timed conditions. Good luck on your LSAT and in law school.

Jrtzsweetie

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Re: Kaplan LSAT course
« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2004, 02:30:58 PM »
Hi guys,
    Thanks so much for the advice/feedback.  I'm still trying to figure out whether I should take Kaplan or another course.  But I do agree that studying on my own and using as many materials as possible (REAL LSATs) could produce good, if not the same results, as from a prep course.  I've started studying from MASTER the LSAT (Arco) and I ordered some prep tests.  I'll do this and see how it goes, then if I feel as if I need a course, I'll proceed from there.  But, thanks for all the responses.  I really do appreciate it. They make my worries not as worrisome...  :)

-D