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Author Topic: Cornell waitlist  (Read 3977 times)

Maharishi

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Cornell waitlist
« on: March 26, 2004, 06:01:08 PM »
I'm stuck on Cornell's LLM waitlist...

Does anyone have a clue about my chances to get in after the wait? ;)

pallavi

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Re: Cornell waitlist
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2004, 03:37:36 PM »
Hi there , I am also on the waiting list of Cornells LLM progm.I ve been told the chance is quite good , but there is no ranking system for the wait list , hence u just need to get lucky I guess . Rather let me als know when u get a reply . send me a post directly on my email add .
I wil keep u posted if I hear something .

te loren

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Re: Cornell waitlist
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2004, 12:36:30 AM »
hang in there. usually, those who apply to cornell apply to other schools, too. chances are if they get admitted to other schools to which they decide to go, then slots get freed.i'm an LLM at another Ivy law school so i get to hear all these anecdotal tales. good luck.

Pallavi

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Re: Cornell waitlist
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2004, 08:50:20 AM »
Thank you loren for writing in . I am feeling more confident now . I also wanted to ask somone already doing LLm , as to how difficult it is to pass the degree . I ve never felt so silly in my life ,but am getting cold feet thinking of attending LLM classes at Cornell . The level of competence sure must be hell difficult .
Any peice of advice on that .

te loren

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Re: Cornell waitlist
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2004, 10:03:25 AM »
I believe it depends on a lot of circumstances-the kind of law you want to specialize in, your previous experience if you have worked before, your country's legal system if you are a foreigner and definitely, you command of the english language and knowledge and appreciation for the American culture and lifestyle. I hear Cornell grades are not very generously given as opposed to say, Harvard; and the Cornell graduate law program is smaller than most of the other leading law schools, so that might be a factor, too. Smaller classes tend to be better; they give you a more personal interraction with the people in the class.where else did you apply to? NYU is easy to get into, i think. and the other schools in Wash. DC.
good luck.

Pallavi

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Re: Cornell waitlist
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2004, 03:43:15 PM »
Loren, I ve mailed to you , I hope u dont mind . Kindly reply back when u get time .
and my area of interest is corporate laws .My command over english is good , and I am glad cornell has a small class . it wld be an advantage certainly .

Maharishi

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Re: Cornell waitlist
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2004, 09:53:13 AM »
NYU, easy to get into?  ???

I was rejected there... They seem to require a strong work experience, and I don't have any in law.

By the way, do you guys think that the usual rankings (US News, Leiter...) apply to LLM programs as well?

te loren

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US News Rankings
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2004, 05:10:36 PM »
First off, I have issues in tegard to the rankings game. The lists-US News, Brennan, Princeton, etc- they can be helpful guides as to the general quality of the law schools. You should look at the individual programs instead.
If the rankings are credible at all, I believe they do not apply to LLM programs as the different law schools have their individual preferences-NYU/Georgetown, tax; Harvard, Yale, Stanford, government, regulation, etc, Columbia, interntational/corporate law. There is an LLM ranking link in this forum-the only one-where Columbia is number 1, Harvard is no. 2. But that, too must be taken with a grain of salt.

NYU is easier to get into than all the other so-called top law schools as NYU gets as many as 400 LLMs each year, two or three times more than any leading law school, but perhaps, not really easy compared to more accommodating schools. Yes, experience counts a lot since these schools want to have a diverse profile not only in terms nationality but more in terms of what you bring to the academic community since LLMs are graduate students. They are expected to contribute their experience to the intellectual discourse. And then there is the prestige part. They would rather take someone who has worked at say, the Rwanda Criminal Court or the Yugoslavia court over one who's wet behind the ears.

What I know is since they don't conduct interviews, the application letter and the recommendations carry so much weight, all things being, more or less, equal.