Law School Discussion

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Author Topic: Concord Law School  (Read 70308 times)

ruskiegirl

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #60 on: January 15, 2005, 04:30:37 PM »
Good points.  I haven't suggested or at least I did not mean to suggest that DL and non-ABA or lower ranked schools are the equivalent to HYS and other very good 'regular' schools.

My point has been that my school and schools like it offer situations that work for their students.  It may be that we can't move to a better school, or our LSATs aren't as good or we have to work, or we have familys to care for. 

I do not expect my legal education to measure up to others.  I don't have the time or the opportunities.  At the same time, I don't need some of the opportunities that HYS provide.  NSL fits my needs and supports my goals. 

I don't know, but I have read in many places that HYS and others have grave flaws in their programs.  That's not my opinion.  It's the experts and pundits who say that.  If those experts and pundits are correct, there are parts of my education at NSL that will be superior to those schools, but you don't have an argument with me.  Your argument is with the experts and pundits.  I don't know the first think about HYS and the better schools.  I'm not in a position to judge them.  Any criticisms I've leveled against them are echoes of those experts and pundits.

But I don't think it helps the discussion for some people to abuse those who are in less prestigious and unconvential schools, because we may be happy with our choices.  These schools work for us.  Will they give us what we want in the future?  There's evidence that it will.  It will not land us in BIGLAW in Manhattan or a seat on the Supreme Court, but only the unrealistically optimistic among us even consider such things from a seat in a night law school.

I agree that there are justifiable reasons to attend night programs, DL programs and non-ABA schools.  There are financial, family and geographic considerations at stake for some students that are not at stake for others.  I don't get off on punishing people for rational choices that they made in life.  

I did not really have a problem with this thread until someone chose to "abuse" MY school, by insinuating that DL graduates have superior educations.  Notice, I did not say that I would be getting an education superior to yours; all I pointed out was that large firms, for whatever reason, prefer top graduates.  This preference has nothing to do with me or my opinion (for those of you defaming me), and I feel no need to apologize for it.  

The point is, while those people who attend non-traditional programs scream for respect, they defame other programs in the process.  Perhaps I am wrong, but I think it's highly hypocritical to demand that respect while providing anecdotal evidence that an attorney graduate from a top school is basically incompetent.  If you (this is directed to all the posters) want respect, show some!

DOWNY

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #61 on: January 15, 2005, 04:53:55 PM »
I noticed that one poster went too far in praising DL programs. 

I agree with you JeffJoe. Let's be best friends.

menotomy

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #62 on: April 15, 2005, 08:52:26 PM »
If you graduate from a non aba jd i think you can still be admitted to st thomas, miami's llm program, the tax llm is online, this will let you into some states the best way to go is to go the the rules of the state you want to practice in, many for example once admitted then you can go to and take their bar exam



7. Requirements for admission -- Applicants admitted to the practice of law in another jurisdiction of the United States
(a) Each applicant who has been admitted to the practice of law in another jurisdiction of the United States may be admitted upon motion and without examination in this state provided that at the time of application the applicant has been actively engaged in the practice of law for five of the preceding ten years in one or more jurisdictions of the United States, is currently licensed to practice in at least one such jurisdiction, and is not under suspension or revocation in any jurisdiction. Any part of the five-year admission requirement is waived to the extent that any jurisdiction in which the applicant is currently licensed and in which the applicant has actively engaged in the practice of law for not less than six months requires fewer than five years admission as a condition of admission upon motion and without examination for attorneys licensed in this state, provided, however, that at the time of application the applicant has been actively engaged in the practice of law for not less than three of the preceding ten years in one or more jurisdictions of the United States, is currently licensed to practice in at least one such jurisdiction and is not under suspension or revocation in any jurisdiction.

(b) Each applicant who at the time of application has been admitted and has engaged in the practice of law for less than five of the preceding ten years in one or more jurisdictions of the United States, is currently licensed to practice in at least one such jurisdiction, and is not under suspension or revocation in any jurisdiction may be admitted after examination as described in 6(a)-(e).

ruskiegirl

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #63 on: April 16, 2005, 03:53:52 AM »
If you graduate from a non aba jd i think you can still be admitted to st thomas, miami's llm program, the tax llm is online, this will let you into some states the best way to go is to go the the rules of the state you want to practice in, many for example once admitted then you can go to and take their bar exam



7. Requirements for admission -- Applicants admitted to the practice of law in another jurisdiction of the United States

Yes, but will it teach you to use proper punctuation in your sentences?

grownUp

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #64 on: April 19, 2005, 03:27:22 PM »
I'm hoping this thread has exhausted itself of the juvenile rantings presented over the last several board pages.

It seems a very important point has been underemphasized - DL coursework is an excellent opportunity for a GROWN-UP to continue their education. I have already done my undergraduate work(Stanford).  I have already paid off my student loans. I already have a career. I have kids, a mortgage, cars and even, gasp, a country club membership - What I don't have is Time.

Are there any adults out there who are considering DL law school? Specifically, Concord? What are you thinking?

drewnrupe

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #65 on: April 19, 2005, 04:06:35 PM »
Hey Grownup,
Seriously considering Concorde myself at the moment.  Gone through all the arguments know the limitations etc. still think it is my best way forward at the moment.  Have a career , want the knowledge, want to learn again, added string to my bow but not loking to start at a big law firm or practice law full time even.

I had first looked a this a few months back at whcich time On-Line lawschool meant Concord.  Has something changed or is it just that a number of what were correspondance schools now call themselves on-line ? There suddenly seems to be a lot more schools touting on-line JDs.

If we put aside all the restrictions of DL law schools has anybody any input on their differences relative to each other as opposed to telling me again how much better four years spent in class feeling OLD would be :-)  Dont get me wrong If I had the time to go to school full time I would consider it,  In my position the commitment to 4 evenings a week isnt practical either or I may consider that  ( despite the extra 10 G a year that would be for my local law schools part time program )

Thanks

D

Nontradstudent

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #66 on: April 20, 2005, 01:32:16 AM »
As another grown up  (hey! When did that happen? I don't recall signing a consent...)  With a career and commitments, DL is the only way for me.  I loked at almost all the DL schools, and it came down to Concord or NWCU.  They have similar pass rates on the baby and general bars. I was able to track down practicing alumni of both.  With most things being equal, it came down to cost.  NWCU is only 3,000 a year.  Much less than concord.

grownUp

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #67 on: April 20, 2005, 06:03:27 PM »
I suppose I should check out NWCU...

Is the solitary difference cost?

I have discovered the number of Online programs for Masters degrees has really grown over the past year. University of Minnesota (a very good school IMHO) is offering a bunch of DL courses. Oberlin(!) is too, and quite a number of other excellent traditional universities.

I'm finding that quite a few have the audacity to charge the same amount in tuition no matter if you are online on on campus.... It'll be interesting to watch this learning method continue to evolve. It certainly cannot replace the all important ON Campus experience, however once you have been there done that etc, etc.....

sharkfish

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #68 on: April 21, 2005, 11:12:57 PM »
You may want to take a look at the archives on my blog at

http://www.dljd.net

I am a Taft student and I like it so far.  I chose Taft partly because they are nationally accredited.

My blog has a lot of stuff.  It is organized chronologically though, so I'd start in Jan 2005 archives, unless you just want to read backwards. :)


law543

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #69 on: April 22, 2005, 06:16:46 PM »
<<Yes, but will it teach you to use proper punctuation in your sentences?>>

Apparently, your school hasn't taught you manners. Perhaps you require all posts you read to demonstrate perfect punctuation...nobody else is bound by that requirement, however...nor does it indicate an inability to use proper punctuation or grammer.

The poster provided information that is likely to be useful to somebody. Who cares about the punctuation? (besides you, I mean)

Law543