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Author Topic: Concord Law School  (Read 69588 times)

LegalLatin78

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #100 on: October 25, 2006, 12:44:14 PM »
In all honest truth, here is what every single employer has told me about online law degrees/phd's/masters programs.  If you already have a successful career and want to go into consulting, then the online degree may work for you.  Not many places will take an online degree seriously.  I am not saying this out of agreement with that philosophy, just repeating what I have heard over and over again.  I have worked in arbitration, mediation, and dispute resolution.  Some of the arbitrators and mediators had studied and received degrees through DL.  I have yet to meet anyone in private practice or working for the gov't, state, local law who went through DL. 

landrover06

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #101 on: November 12, 2006, 03:03:36 AM »
I don't think the ABA will ever accredit Concord.  This is not a bad thing and is no reflection on Concord.  The ABA fears Concord.  How many students would prefer to sit in the privacy of their homes earning an ABA law degree without ever being subjected to the socratic method, the politics, aggravation of competitive classmates, and the high expense?  Enough to greatly diminish the demand for B&M law schools I can tell you that. 

So Concord has established a special niche for itself and the school is relatively new.  It will gain credibility as its graduates disseminate into practice and establish themselves.  It has an impressive bar passage rate for a newer school.  I am impressed with the school and would encourage anyone to take a serious look if their circumstances call for it.  A have always felt that a JD is a valuable degree no matter how you get it.

Mesquite

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #102 on: November 25, 2006, 05:57:50 AM »
  I have yet to meet anyone in private practice or working for the gov't, state, local law who went through DL. 

A buddy of mine told me a musician in the band "Country Joe and the Fish" did DL, or correspondence as it was called back then, and was now working as a public defender. 

Thinking he was full of BS, I researched it and lo and behold here is the story:

Barry Melton is THE public defender in Yolo county California.

http://www.counterculture.net/thefish/#bio

http://www.yolocounty.org/org/publicdefender/index.htm

and here is a quote from an interview with him from

http://www.riprense.com/barrymeltonq&a.htm

"MELTON: In California, there are three ways to become a lawyer--go to school, study with a lawyer or study by so-called "distance learning." In my day, "distance learning" meant correspondence study; however, more recently, the term has come to be associated with study over the Internet. I truly don't believe that one method is any harder than the others, as in the end all law students must pass a three-day examination to be admitted to practice. In music, self-directed study is called "woodshedding" and studying law is no more or less difficult than that. And there are well over 100,000 lawyers in California, so whatever it is that it takes to become a lawyer is well within the reach of most people."


brabdau

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #103 on: November 28, 2006, 12:14:15 PM »
I am almost positive that the states that allow you to transfer in after 5 years only apply to ABA graduates and will never let a non-aba grad practice.

I've checked a few states that interest me for practice, Arizona and Colorado, both allow you to take their bar after practicing 5 of the last 7 years.  Arizona requires you to hold a JD from an ABA approved school, however, Rule 34 allows for an exception, if you have been admitted to another states bar you can still sit for their bar regardless of your schools accreditation.  Colorado only requires you be admitted in another states bar for the last 5 of 7 years or if your state allows admittance into their bar by motion for Colorado attys then you can be admitted into Colorado’s bar by motion.

I haven't checked all states requirements, but there are definitely states that DO allow DL JD's to practice in their states.

Dexter

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #104 on: June 06, 2007, 07:37:01 PM »

2. What are Concord's Bar passage rates?
Answer: Concord is a new institution. It was founded in 1998. Only two classes have sat for the California Bar. Six out of the ten students passed the first time out of the original class. Six out of fourteen passed on the first try from the second class. To date: 12 out of 24 have passed the California Bar exam on their first try.

3. How does this compare with other schools?
Answer: Pretty well. On the last Cal Bar exam, 3 of 5 Stanford students passed the exam. Only 38% of USC law school grads passed the same exam. UCLA was the only California school that posted an exceptional pass rate on the Cal Bar at 79%. Cooley, an ABA school in Michigan ,recorded a 0 out of 22 on the same test; no Cooley grad passed the Cal Bar. What does that say about Concord? They are doing pretty well at this point. The Cal Bar seems to be a particularly tough exam.

HOW could your data be so wrong?! In 2004, the bar passage rate in California for first time takers for the following schools was as follows: Stanford - 90%; USC - 79%; UCLA - 89%.

You will NEVER see Stanford, USC, UCLA or any other upper-tier law schools with passage rates as low as you claim.

As far as your claim that California has a difficult bar exam, let's be real: the low passage rate in California is in large part attributable to types of students taking the exam...you have a lot of sub-par students going to sub-par law schools in California, which skews the bar results downward.

Watch your facts before you offer an online informercial again. (And you may want to mention the gaudy 41% passage rate for first time takers of the CA bar for Concord through July '06.)

VegasJD

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Re: Concord Law School
« Reply #105 on: June 28, 2010, 06:55:31 PM »

3. How does this compare with other schools?
Answer: Pretty well. On the last Cal Bar exam, 3 of 5 Stanford students passed the exam. Only 38% of USC law school grads passed the same exam. UCLA was the only California school that posted an exceptional pass rate on the Cal Bar at 79%. Cooley, an ABA school in Michigan ,recorded a 0 out of 22 on the same test; no Cooley grad passed the Cal Bar. What does that say about Concord? They are doing pretty well at this point. The Cal Bar seems to be a particularly tough exam.

HOW could your data be so wrong?! In 2004, the bar passage rate in California for first time takers for the following schools was as follows: Stanford - 90%; USC - 79%; UCLA - 89%.

You will NEVER see Stanford, USC, UCLA or any other upper-tier law schools with passage rates as low as you claim.

As far as your claim that California has a difficult bar exam, let's be real: the low passage rate in California is in large part attributable to types of students taking the exam...you have a lot of sub-par students going to sub-par law schools in California, which skews the bar results downward.
Watch your facts before you offer an online informercial again. (And you may want to mention the gaudy 41% passage rate for first time takers of the CA bar for Concord through July '06.)
Actually he was correct for the February 2004 exam.  Go to http://admissions.calbar.ca.gov/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=0T9sI2mkkqo%3d&tabid=2269 and you will see 3 of 5 for first time takers for Stanford, 3 of 8 for first time takers from USC and UCLA as 11 of 14.