Law School Discussion

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Author Topic: Serious Problem  (Read 3682 times)

NonBS

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Re: Serious Problem
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2004, 01:58:10 PM »
Wow. Do not listen to the bull advice given by ohiolaw. 

Law admissions are done almost completely by the numbers, soft factors like work experience or extra curriculars are only slightly important. Law proffessors, at least at the 1st tier schools, are incredibly talented legal scholars who have impressive legal experience.

BullGod

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Re: Serious Problem
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2004, 02:20:53 PM »
Stupid ("many law professors are typically poor attorneys or they would never have left practice") with a blinding sense of entitlement ("I will make it a point to give them a choice that they can either accept me or face a lawsuit for discrimination") is no way to go through life, son.

I would like to weigh in on this issue. First off if you have been out of school a while I think that will work to your advantage because your more mature (hopefully) and on task. Secondly, I would make application like everyone else. I am convinced a lot of admissions are based on who you know rather than talent so, you put your pants on like anyone else. Keep in mind the LSAT does not determine how well you will do in law school. In my mind it is nothing more than high stakes testing with no purpose. So when take the test the point of view that it is not a make or break situation. Third, make sure you get to know one or two lawyers that graduated from the law school you want to attend. I have creditable evidence that admission to a law school boils down to a "good ole boy" environment. I have already interviewed several second year law students in addition to three deans of law schools. When someone cannot give you straight answers to honest questions, you know the selection process is flawed. Finally, I would make it a point to send out 15 to 20 applications. I know this can be costly but you will be surprised to the results you get. I would say out of 20 applications you probably will get seven offers and the rest rejections. Of the seven figure out which one will cost you the least and then enroll. If I were you I would not pay to much attention to most of the people that get all hung up on law school rankings because each student has to take a required course of study to qualify to sit for the bar exam of the state you live in. You would have to check with your state supreme court to see if they have any additional requirements you need to do. Do not depend on a law school to direct you through the process because most of those people are clueless if you are an out of state applicate.

Remember one thing when you get to law school, look around you and your classmates. They all come from different backgrounds and levels of abilities. Everyone of you have a 4.0 GPA. The key is to keep that 4.0. I am a graduate student finishing my Masters Program and will be making application to a law school of my choice. I say that because I will make it a point to give them a choice that they can either accept me or face a lawsuit for discrimination. I seriously doubt a law school wants bad media attention.

Another thing to consider is many law professors are typically poor attorneys or they would never have left practice. Many discovered that they knew what was in the book and can tell you all about a subject but lack the ability to practice law. The real difference between you and the professor is he/she has passed a bar exam and you have yet to take one. A law license does not make you a lawyer by a long stretch.

Law school is no different than any other course of study. You either want to be there and get through it or you don't. I know some pretty good lawyers that are not rocket scientists and I know some extremely bright people that have law licenses that I would never let handle any legal business I might have.

I hope this helped you out and I wish you well.

Ignatius1491

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Re: Serious Problem
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2004, 04:01:39 PM »
The nice thing about South Texas and Southern is they specialize in finding decent lawyers from the pool of Texas applicants who couldn’t get into Texas, Baylor, SMU, or Houston.  This pool includes a lot of bright people who may have a tarnished academic record (for whatever reason).  They do look at factors beyond the GPA/LSAT table.  Those scores are of course important, but they may not be the dispositive factor that they are elsewhere.  Another school you may want to try right now is St. Mary’s.  It used to be a great school that turned out plenty of sharp Texas litigators, but it took a nose dive in recent years (due in large part to poor leadership and faculty-hiring decisions) and now they are in a kind of rebuilding mode.  Anyway, my point is that at these smaller, “less-prestigious” schools, GPA and LSAT are not the Alpha-Omega they are at others.  Good luck!

Mulder

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Re: Serious Problem
« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2004, 05:17:09 PM »
The nice thing about South Texas and Southern is they specialize in finding decent lawyers from the pool of Texas applicants who couldn’t get into Texas, Baylor, SMU, or Houston.  This pool includes a lot of bright people who may have a tarnished academic record (for whatever reason).  They do look at factors beyond the GPA/LSAT table.  Those scores are of course important, but they may not be the dispositive factor that they are elsewhere.  Another school you may want to try right now is St. Mary’s.  It used to be a great school that turned out plenty of sharp Texas litigators, but it took a nose dive in recent years (due in large part to poor leadership and faculty-hiring decisions) and now they are in a kind of rebuilding mode.  Anyway, my point is that at these smaller, “less-prestigious” schools, GPA and LSAT are not the Alpha-Omega they are at others.  Good luck!

I appreciate the situation. I started at UH, stumbled out in three semesters with less than a 2.0, then went to North Harvard Community College (H-Town folks will get that joke) part time and was accepted on probation to UTSA. Then completely kicked ass my last 2 years and graduated with a 3.53 overall at UTSA and a 3.9 in my major. Got a 157 on LSAT. Got rejected at UH. Got accepted to STCL.