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Author Topic: summers  (Read 1327 times)

inCA

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summers
« on: May 27, 2003, 08:36:30 AM »
Hi again!   So, what did you do during the summer after 1L (or 2L even).  Where did you work and what kind of programs does BU have for setting you up with firms, judges, government agencies, etc?  Did anyone work out of state?

When you were trying to get these jobs for the summer after 1L, what did potential employees look for (resume, transcript, etc.)?  Did people with law-related work experience before law school fare better?

Also, what did you do the summer before 1L?

Thanks a lot :):)

Andrew

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Re: summers
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2003, 01:42:36 PM »
My first summer I worked at a non-profit legal center ("The Hale and Dorr Legal Services Center of Harvard University").  I got a grant through a BU group called the Public Interest Project.  They give a lot grants but the competition can be stiff - and you have to earn the grant by raising money.

This summer I'm thus-far unemployed.  Actually I have a good sorta "quarter-time" job and a couple good leads for other jobs.  I have a lot of friends at big firms in NY and some in Boston (more in NY).  I wouldn't say that's the norm though.  The economy is bad and most people seem to be grabbing what they can get - working for a professor, a small firm, or public interest (often unpaid).  Hopefully things will pick up for everyone in the next year or two.

As far as resources, the Career Development office is somewhat helpful.  They have job listings, advice (cover letters, resumes), and they try to do a little more (alumni meetings and what not).

I'm not sure as to where everyone worked vs. wanted to work.  Most of my friends stayed in Boston the first year, and either stayed or went to NY the second.  It seems like most people that go to other states are from those states.

I doubt law-related experience had too much effect on people getting 1L jobs, but I'm not sure.  I didn't notice much difference between people who worked before law school and those who came straight from college.  Employers often ask for cover letters and resumes.  Sometimes they ask for a transcript (usually not undergrad unless you're doing patents), and a writing sample.  They rarely ask for references and when they do, they hardly ever call them.

Summer before 1L I finished up my job in San Francisco, moved all my stuff home to Seattle, came to Boston to find an apartment, and went back to Seattle where I can't remember doing much of anything before moving to Boston.

roger

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Re: summers
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2003, 02:37:38 AM »
1L (now): internship - us district court

mt

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Re: summers
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2003, 03:20:36 AM »
Just a couple of comments...  I'm a rising 2L, and was lucky to land a firm job this summer in Boston.  I only know of a handful of classmates that are working at large law firms this summer, and none of them had any prior law-related work experience.  That said, all (except one) of them did have at least two years of prior "corporate-related" work experience (e.g., consulting, financial services).  So while I don't think prior law-related work experience is necessary to get a summer firm job, those with some work experience were certainly at a comparative advantage.

Regarding resources at the school, you'll find that as soon as school starts, the CDO will tell you, "Don't worry about finding a summer job, focus on your class work."  In the main, they're right.  Your first-year grades are much more important in the long run -- employers seeking to fill their 2L summer positions focus a great deal on them.  But it's hard NOT to worry about finding a summer job because, after all, you'll have to find some way to pay the rent, buy groceries, etc.  Fair warning, you should expect little help from the CDO in finding a job for the summer after first-year (aside from the occasional resume review or panel discussion).  You're largely on your own.  That means, start networking early and often, set up informational interviews, and leverage personal contacts, etc.

Good luck.