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Author Topic: LSAT  (Read 3189 times)

Peter

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LSAT
« on: August 31, 2001, 11:49:47 AM »
I am doing some research into the LSAT, and I am seeking a chart that would enable me to convert current scores (120 - 180) into their equivalent scores on the old LSAT (20 - 50). If you know of any source of information that would enable me to obtain this information, please respond.

harvard 1L

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Re: LSAT
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2001, 12:20:26 PM »
i think that's all on the Law School Admission Council website (www.lsac.org)  They administer the test... they should have the statistics.  good luck!

tokyojoe

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Re: LSAT
« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2002, 07:54:23 PM »
The LSAT is about as effective in anything relating to law school study as is eating a bunch of bananas. It is a joke and means nothing.

jgutta

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Re: LSAT
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2004, 11:48:34 AM »
Is it still possible to get into law school with a GPA of 3.8 but a LSAT score of 146.  Also can anybody tell me what UGPA stands for.

First Year

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Re: LSAT
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2004, 05:19:30 AM »
UGPA usually means Undergraduate Grade Point Average. As far as the GPA but low LSAT score, anything is possible, but try to be realistic as well. I had a high GPA, in the same range as you and an LSAT score that was a bit higher. I started learning that although your grades count a lot, your LSAT is a good indicator of which schools to apply to. If you look at top tier schools, the GPA is in the same range, if not lower than your GPA, yet the LSAT is probably much higher. The schools tend to go off of the LSAT more because its the leveling of the playing field in their minds. Someone could come from Harvard with a 3.0 and someone come from a lower ranked undergrad that has a 3.9, but the LSAT is the standardized test that evens everyone out. So it weighs a lot. But dont give up hope, just ask the schools your thinking about what they believe your odds are, apply to a wide range of schools, and make sure to beef up your application and essay with as much as you can. I have a friend who had my GPA, a higher LSAT score, and came from a high ranked undergrad, and didn't get accepted to any law school, whereas I got into 4 or 5 with scholarships. So, just come to terms with your score and know that it doesnt count you out by any means.

ryan1113

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Re: LSAT
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2004, 06:11:05 PM »
Is it still possible to get into law school with a GPA of 3.8 but a LSAT score of 146.  Also can anybody tell me what UGPA stands for.

That would get you a 25% tuition scholarship at Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Michigan (the largest law school in the country).  If you retook the LSAT and got two points higher on the LSAT, you could get a 50% tuition scholarship.  Consider whether you were going to slow on the LSAT or spending too much time on the scattered 'impossibly hard' questions that LSAC includes on the test.  Learning to identify and skip these questions will give you more time to spend on the easy to moderate difficulty questions which most have the potential to solve.

If you do well and get decent grades your first year, it's easy to transfer to a better law school (at least tier II).  Many schools require 28 or 30 credits to apply as a transfer student.