Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: How accurate is this of admissions?  (Read 808 times)

legends159

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
How accurate is this of admissions?
« on: March 28, 2005, 09:35:46 PM »
Ok lets see:

So the law school starts off by giving you an index number based mainly on the GPA and the LSATs and then forms three piles:

1) The Automatic Accept Pile: Applicants in this pile are virtually assured of being admitted to the school. While the committee will look at the rest of the applicants' files, only unusual circumstances will cause an applicant to be rejected (i.e., conviction of murder, cheating on the LSAT, etc.)

2) The Automatic Reject Pile: Applicants in this pile are immediately rejected from the school. Unfortunately, the committee will not even look at the rest of the file.

3) The Middle Pile: Applicants in this pile can be either accepted to or rejected from the school, based on their indices plus everything else in the file. The academic index for each applicant is high enough to qualify the applicant for admission, but not high enough to guarantee acceptance. Thus, the admissions committee looks at everything else in the applicants' files. As to other criteria, a 1990 survey of law school admissions officers (DeLoggio, Loretta. 1992. DeLoggio Achievement Program) asked that they rank various criteria (other than LSAT and GPA) on a scale of 1-7. The criteria are discussed below in order of importance, based on the averaged answers to the 1990 survey. Remember, these are ranked based on the average response, so law schools will differ in their respective ranking of the criteria.

How accurate is this ranking of importance for admission?

1. Law School Admissions Test (LSAT)
2. Grade Point Average (GPA)
3. Personal Statement
4. Letters of Recommendation
5. Undergraduate Institution
6. Grade Trends
7. Major and Difficulty of Courses
8. Work Experience and/or Graduate Degrees
9. Writing Skill (from personal statement and Lsat writing sample)
10. Extracurricular Activities

Another question, do the top law schools care about extracurriculars? I feel that there would be so many people with high GPA and Lsats applying to these top schools that something such as leadership qualities could be the X factor. Please correct any of my misconceptions. Thanks.  







thisis1984

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 115
    • View Profile
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2005, 09:40:53 PM »

How accurate is this ranking of importance for admission?

1. Law School Admissions Test (LSAT)
2. Grade Point Average (GPA)
3. Personal Statement
4. Letters of Recommendation
5. Undergraduate Institution
6. Grade Trends
7. Major and Difficulty of Courses
8. Work Experience and/or Graduate Degrees
9. Writing Skill (from personal statement and Lsat writing sample)
10. Extracurricular Activities

Another question, do the top law schools care about extracurriculars? I feel that there would be so many people with high GPA and Lsats applying to these top schools that something such as leadership qualities could be the X factor. Please correct any of my misconceptions. Thanks. 



I think such rankings are meaningless.  It really depends on the applicant.  For instance, for an applicant with really great/unusual LORs, the LOR component might become quite significant.  For someone with really unusual work experience that catches the adcomms eye, the importance of the WE might shoot up to be more important than LORs.  See what I mean?  It's meaningless to rank these factors, with the exception of LSAT and GPA, which clearly are up there as the most important factors (but again, not always).

legends159

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2005, 09:45:03 PM »
Well ranking them would help me focus on what I need. I thought that the SATs was the most important factor in undergrad admissions with GPA second and I got screwed because I had very limited extraccuricular activities.

thisis1984

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 115
    • View Profile
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2005, 09:59:41 PM »
Well ranking them would help me focus on what I need. I thought that the SATs was the most important factor in undergrad admissions with GPA second and I got screwed because I had very limited extraccuricular activities.

Well, obviously you should be focusing mainly on GPA and LSAT.  But in my experience, GPA alone isn't enough to cut it -- you need great academics.  Anyone can pull off a good GPA, but what will really make you stand out is having a good GPA in tough classes, accompanied by research experience, academic honors and awards, great LORs that attest to your academic abilities, etc.  In other words, show you have a true interest in your studies, not just learning what you need to know for the tests.

Other than that, again, it really depends on you as an applicant.  You can shape your application around your strengths. If you have a passion for something -- gay rights, classical guitar, debating; whatever -- then throw yourself into it and it will certainly help show your depth as an applicant and improve your personal statement.  If you're a really dedicated scholar (i.e. tough classes, lots of research experience, advanced degrees, etc.) then make your application focus on that aspect of yourself.

Deuces Take Em

  • Guest
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2005, 10:35:14 PM »
There's no auto-reject pile based on index.  That's retarded.

Imagine a 2.2/150 applies to HLS.  The admin gets the application and throws it away, not looking at anything beyond GPA and LSAT.  So do all of the other T50 schools.

Guess what, now the black female nobellaureate from Uganda whose father runs half of the U.N. is going to Texas Southern University.  Plausible?  I think not.

The "below range" files are still read in their entirety, but perused for important factors much like the "above range" files would be for criminal offenses and the like.

ccorsi

  • Guest
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2005, 10:45:14 PM »
Your list is seriously lacking the number 3 factor - URM.  And any other diversity issue:  Disability, veteran, WE, etc.

C2

Javert

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1612
  • Time.
    • AOL Instant Messenger - Rov47
    • View Profile
    • Spirit of Sisyphus
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2005, 10:51:36 PM »
Yeah, ccorsi is right. The three most important factors are LSAT, raw GPA, and race. Everything else is far, far less important.
Attending: U Texas

"The truth is usually just an excuse for a lack of imagination." -- Garak, "Improbable Cause", Deep Space Nine

legends159

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2005, 11:12:20 PM »
Well its not MY list, I dont want to take credit for it nor criticism of any kind. I got it off some site about admissions. I'm guessing that diversity was not included in their list because each school has different ways of factoring race.

Just out of curiosity sake, how common is it for someone from community college or a tier 3 or 4 undergrad to make it into tier 1 law schools and even into the top 5?

Deuces Take Em

  • Guest
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2005, 01:33:38 AM »
T1, not hard.  T14, not too hard, if you've got the scores.  T3, you're really stretching it even with the scores, as you'll note the number of lower tiered UG's listed on HYS websites chart of represented UG's.

Don't worry, I'm right there w/ ya.

UHouston U.G.  Emphasis on the "UG"

legends159

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
Re: How accurate is this of admissions?
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2005, 04:24:52 PM »
Well of course logically more kids would get into the T3 law schools from top undergrads because there is a bigger pool of students who are hardworking and bright. BTW Deuces what year are you?