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Author Topic: Attorneys and State Legislators  (Read 748 times)

jhusser

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Attorneys and State Legislators
« on: March 16, 2005, 03:18:28 PM »
Is it logistically feasible to be a state legislator while practicing law and still make a nice income (70k-ish total; legislative salary 25K,).  In my state the House of Representatives meets for about two and a half months.  So a lawyer who is a legislator could only practice about 9 months out of the year.  During those nine months that lawyer/legislator would probably need to spend 10-15 hours a week on legislative duties.  What type of law would be most useful for this scenario?  What about the size of this hypothetical persons firm?  I have read that big firms can accomodate legislators, but there seems to be a large window for a conflict of interest between big firm duties and state legislative duties simply because a big firm is involved in so many aspects of society.   I think a transactional attorney could balance a lawyer/legislator lifestyle better. What would be the effects of being a state legislator when this person starts to practice law?  Impediment, reservoir for contacts, prestige, etc?   

jhusser

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2005, 09:28:32 PM »
bump

A.J

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2005, 09:30:10 PM »
Obviously you're asking the wrong people.  Find a rep that has a degree and ask him.  Im sure that he/she wouldnt mind an email from a curious mind.

jhusser

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2005, 09:35:00 PM »
Ok

jessesamuel

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2005, 04:59:09 AM »
But then let us know what you find out!

jhusser

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2005, 03:57:33 PM »
But then let us know what you find out!

Better yet.  I hope to show you.

jessesamuel

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #6 on: March 18, 2005, 03:33:40 AM »
but before you show us in 5-10 years, tell us.

jhusser

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2005, 01:43:20 PM »
I like the Nader avatar.  I talked to a few legislators and a few law professors.  The law professors said that it could be possible to run a campaign while in law school if the campaign was largely as a 3L.  These professors also said that one should look at law school like a regular 40 or 50 hour a week job.  They said not to believe law students who say they study 40 to 80 hours a week after class and that these people were lying or miscalculating their time.  They said the only reason someone would study to 1 am is if they began at 9pm.   The legislators and professors both said to practice whatever type of law you liked, but it was increasings difficult to be a solo-practitioner or work in a small firm because one would need other lawyers in a firm to cover one's workload during the legislative session.  They also said that most big firm would want legislators to work for them.  I also learned that in some states there is a provision that legislator-attorneys can postone court dates of cases during the legislative session (this could be a pontential unethical advantage for defense lawyers).  I am still unresolved about the conflict of interest of working at a big firm while being a legislator. 

jessesamuel

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2005, 04:50:25 PM »
thanks. see you in the hallowed halls of..... well, maybe they're not so hallowed.

jhusser

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Re: Attorneys and State Legislators
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2005, 01:40:11 PM »
thanks. see you in the hallowed halls of..... well, maybe they're not so hallowed.

Come on all aspiring Politicians should be niave enough to think that everyone is upright and respectable.