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Author Topic: Any shot for GMU?  (Read 901 times)

1LBored

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Re: Any shot for GMU?
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2005, 07:08:34 PM »
I think you've got a pretty good shot. The patent stuff will help a lot. You're applying for the PT program? I would think you'd definintely be in.

Late application might stick you on the waitlist (which I suspect is what happened to me), but you'd probably be one of the first people off of it.

GMULAW

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Re: Any shot for GMU?
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2005, 08:46:40 PM »
Based on some friends of mine that got rejected PT, your chances are not that good, but no news is good news (meaning you weren't an auto reject), so just hold out, they are looking at your application at least.  Law School is all about luck anyway, at least for me it is, so just wait till you hear.  You should be a shoe in for American PT and Catholic PT.
I will choose a path that's free, I will choose free will

dave303

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Re: Any shot for GMU?
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2005, 01:42:59 AM »
I applied in late january to GMU. They sent me a card that stated they would not send decision until at least 3/15. I think they have been pushing for higher and higher numbers to raise their rankings. I bet American and definetly Catholic are good shots. Maybe even GW.

eileen2004

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Re: Any shot for GMU?
« Reply #13 on: March 11, 2005, 09:14:23 AM »
You mean to tell me we have to pay 41.5 percent tax now?  That is absurd.  My agency director told me that I shouldn't have to pay any tax because it is "continuing education."

I think we've gone over this breakdown on employer gifts (which is how tuition benefits are categorized.)

25% flat Federal
9% flat DC
7.65 FICA

For you to have no tax burden law school would have to be necessary for you to keep your current job at your current level of pay.  If you can, check with other people in your agency who are currently in law school to see what their status is (yours may be different, at least in part, because you mentioned needing a certain amount of credits for work.)  The program administrator would also be a good person to call. 

Erapitt

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Re: Any shot for GMU?
« Reply #14 on: March 11, 2005, 09:33:27 AM »
I get a paygrade raise each year regardless.  Actually, its 2 paygrades each year that I go up.  Why would that affect it?  42 percent in taxes just seems so damn absurd.
Attending GW in Fall '06

vivarin

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Re: Any shot for GMU?
« Reply #15 on: March 11, 2005, 09:58:03 AM »
Yeah- I do get taxed on the tuition after the first $5200 each year, but I do own a home- so between that and education credits, I figure a law degree is worth whatever taxes I wind up paying.

I work for the US Patent and Trademark Ofice as an examiner.  They had the tuition program  few years back, but pulled it when our budget got tight.  The Office recently got more $$$, so we are gettign that perk back.  They could yank it at any time, though, which is why I hurried to get apps in this year as opposed to taking my time and applying next cycle.

BTW- they are currently on a hiring binge, if it's your cup of tea.

You know, I'm somewhat interested in being a patent examiner.  Can you tell me what the job entails?  I have a CS/Math background and have been working in the tech industry for th past 5+ years.  Would I be suitable to do this sorta thing?  I'm interested in doing IP for law as well, and am wondering if doing this job plus going to school PT would be a good idea.  What is the pay like?  Thanks!!!

NoVa

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Re: Any shot for GMU?
« Reply #16 on: March 11, 2005, 11:55:16 AM »

I think we've gone over this breakdown on employer gifts (which is how tuition benefits are categorized.)

25% flat Federal
9% flat DC
7.65 FICA

For you to have no tax burden law school would have to be necessary for you to keep your current job at your current level of pay.  If you can, check with other people in your agency who are currently in law school to see what their status is (yours may be different, at least in part, because you mentioned needing a certain amount of credits for work.)  The program administrator would also be a good person to call. 

You've thought about this cost much more than I have.  I have been basing my thoughts on the experience of someone else in my unit.  Plus- I figure that even if I do taxes on this money, or if it comes down to taking some loans to pay those taxes- I'm still getting a huge bargain.  Thanks for cluing me in a bit more.


Also- thanks to everyone else for input on my original question.
3.32, 160
4 years experience as a patent examiner
Attending: American
Accept: UMD, Catholic
WL: GMU
Reject:GULC, GWU

eileen2004

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Re: Any shot for GMU?
« Reply #17 on: March 11, 2005, 12:02:36 PM »
I get a paygrade raise each year regardless.  Actually, its 2 paygrades each year that I go up.  Why would that affect it?  42 percent in taxes just seems so damn absurd.

Change in paygrade doesn't affect your tax status or your benefits.  The distinction made by the IRS between taxable and non-taxable employer paid tuition is that for the tuition payments to be tax exempt, the employee must be required to be in that program in order to keep his current job or current level of compensation.  The inference is that if you didn't take the courses, you'd be demoted or fired.  Law school is almost never tax exempt, because the only people required to have a law degree to keep their current jobs are lawyers, and most of those already have law degrees.  Anyway, I'm not a specialist in tax law, so you can read the documentation on the IRS website yourselves if you're concerned about how this may apply to you. 

Also, there is a $5,250 exemption, so you will not have to pay tax on the first $5,250 paid by your employer each year.