Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?  (Read 2270 times)

Victor

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2198
    • View Profile
What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« on: March 05, 2005, 06:10:49 AM »
This whole transfer of numbers and acceptances causes a lot of stress and anger, even when race is not a matter. Posters argued over RuskieGirl final grades, there are posters arguing over SWB's acceptance, and then theres this whole comparison stuff that goes on . . . is there any justification for this nonsense? Seems like disclosing information causes more bad than good. I understand disclosing an acceptance by your dream school, but, naively, posters disclose everything. All this disclosure makes one look like an incompetent bungler. Posters release information like numbers, school, location, first/last name and pictures. So when you walk in on your first day at law school some people will know you and you will not know them. They will know your strong points and weaknesses and you will not know anything about them. Is this a good idea?

It's very careless for one to release everything to the competition . . . I'm not speaking about someone in particular but rather making a general observation.

Where is the building? I share with only posters I know I can build with. LSD as a whole just isn't that. You definitely have to make some filtration of who to share some information with. I recommend keeping some things private in lieu of releasing everything to potential enemies/stalkers/annoyers. This LSD thing is something new, I highly doubt law school students in the past had something like this. LSD can be a good thing but it can also be a bad thing.


Regal_Muse

  • Guest
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2005, 02:21:30 PM »
Excellent point Victor. I think disclosing too much information can be used against that individual if in the wrong hands. For me, people know where I got accepted at but they aren't going to know which school I finally end up at. That's the irony in all this. Probably two or three people from the board will know my final destination, which may suprise everyone. My advice to newbies: enjoy the message board. I wouldn't necessarily talk about your top choices or where you'll end up at for privacy reasons.

lil_token

  • Guest
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2005, 07:54:25 PM »
This whole transfer of numbers and acceptances causes a lot of stress and anger, even when race is not a matter. Posters argued over RuskieGirl final grades, there are posters arguing over SWB's acceptance, and then theres this whole comparison stuff that goes on . . . is there any justification for this nonsense? Seems like disclosing information causes more bad than good. I understand disclosing an acceptance by your dream school, but, naively, posters disclose everything. All this disclosure makes one look like an incompetent bungler. Posters release information like numbers, school, location, first/last name and pictures. So when you walk in on your first day at law school some people will know you and you will not know them. They will know your strong points and weaknesses and you will not know anything about them. Is this a good idea?

It's very careless for one to release everything to the competition . . . I'm not speaking about someone in particular but rather making a general observation.

Where is the building? I share with only posters I know I can build with. LSD as a whole just isn't that. You definitely have to make some filtration of who to share some information with. I recommend keeping some things private in lieu of releasing everything to potential enemies/stalkers/annoyers. This LSD thing is something new, I highly doubt law school students in the past had something like this. LSD can be a good thing but it can also be a bad thing.



Some truly great points, Vic!  Thanks for making this thread.

I think unfortunately, the bigger problem on BLSD specifically, is that information is disclosed to a few people and "migrates" to the rest of the board.  What ever happened to keeping your mouth shut?  If there's something someone shares with you over PM or AIM and they didn't post it on the regular board, chances are they don't want you sharing that information with other people, ESPECIALLY damn newbies and non-regular posters.

And yes, sadly enough, good intentions often get warped into discussions about validity of acceptances, guesses about 1L grades and other absolutely unfounded conclusions.  The good news is that most of this bull is confined to these pre-law boards and half the things people will say to you on here, behind the veil of anonymity, they would not dare say to your face.  Furthermore, once you get to law school, most people don't give a *&^% what you did to get there -- the more important query is what you can do once you are. 


Victor

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2198
    • View Profile
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2005, 09:28:22 PM »
Check out this thread by BigTex just days after this thread was created:

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/topic,27879.0.html

hey not you hey

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 222
  • Hey. Not you. Hey.
    • View Profile
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2005, 01:12:11 AM »
They will know your strong points and weaknesses and you will not know anything about them. Is this a good idea?

It's very careless for one to release everything to the competition . . . I'm not speaking about someone in particular but rather making a general observation.


I guess I don't consider other LS attendees to be enemies.  True, some people are attending the same schools on this board, but are you trying to tell me that you won't befriend classmates in LS?  I'd like to think that you won't see everyone else in your classrooms as simply competition.  I mean, it's a competitive job market and class rank matters yadda yadda yadda, but quite frankly, I could never go in with such a combative attitude.

If we're simply talking about the internet and sharing knowledge, yes, it's ALWAYS a good idea to assume that someone you don't expect is reading what you share on message boards like this, blogs, emails, etc.  I've been extremely surprised at what people can find with a simple Google search.  It's always a good idea to cover your ass, but I don't think it has to be a game of cat and mouse with people who *may* be fellow students in the future.

faith2005

  • Guest
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2005, 10:55:01 AM »
i didn't really think too much about this issue until that conversation on the pre-law board where that guy started attacking me personally based on my lsn page. i figure if somebody was really interested and researched all of my posts and attended my undergrad or know people there they could figure out who i was. but i didn't think anything i have posted could get somebody that interested. but after that thread i realized that folks seem to be really upset about people getting in with numbers that are lower than theirs and "taking their spot." so i am not sure if people wouldn't take it to the next level and try to take you out if they knew where you were going to ls.

faith2005

  • Guest
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2005, 11:33:38 AM »
but i did put up a page on lsn b/c when i first saw that site i became really discouraged about applying to law school. i figured that i wasn't going to get in anywhere, b/c no one had #'s similar to mine that i saw. so i figured that having my page up, next year somebody else will see it and think that perhaps they have a chance at going to a tier 1 law school despite the low scores.

Victor

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 2198
    • View Profile
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2005, 11:40:02 AM »
but i did put up a page on lsn b/c when i first saw that site i became really discouraged about applying to law school. i figured that i wasn't going to get in anywhere, b/c no one had #'s similar to mine that i saw. so i figured that having my page up, next year somebody else will see it and think that perhaps they have a chance at going to a tier 1 law school despite the low scores.


See thats really sweet.



TrojanChispas

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 4702
  • , a worthy adversary
    • View Profile
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2005, 03:56:30 PM »
i like to think that i have been good at not disclosing info to those that i dont trust and keeping sensetive info to myself that i know about others... it just seems like common internet courtesy.  it is clear who the regular posters are, who can be trusted and who the nut jobs are...
Arab Majority May Not Stay Forever Silent
http://www.nysun.com/article/36110?page_no=1

risingMC

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1251
    • View Profile
Re: What good comes out of disclosing all this information?
« Reply #9 on: March 23, 2005, 10:33:42 AM »
but i did put up a page on lsn b/c when i first saw that site i became really discouraged about applying to law school. i figured that i wasn't going to get in anywhere, b/c no one had #'s similar to mine that i saw. so i figured that having my page up, next year somebody else will see it and think that perhaps they have a chance at going to a tier 1 law school despite the low scores.

That's why I didn't delete my lsn page after the BigTex melee. When I first thought about applying to law school, I couldn't figure out where I really had a decent shot at. There were maybe 5 hispanics/latinos with numbers similar to mine, so that helped ... but I couldn't help thinking that it'd be really much more useful if more minorities put there info up. Yeah, you could possibly be giving AA-haters more ammunition, but I personally feel that this is out-weighed by the help you're going to be giving to future minority applicants.