Law School Discussion

Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?

I kinda' like the Socratic method. I feel it really makes me think and figure things out....probably the reason it is used?

I just don't want to spend the first day of law school making out with the 'porcelain throne' (I have watched the Paper Chase too many times~ :o)

Do you like the Socratic method and is it still widely used?

Alamss

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2005, 05:14:20 PM »
Thats about the only thing that intimidates me about law school. But honestly I think it works because whenever I have taken seminar classes where we had to talk a lot and present material I always studied up like crazy so I wouldn't be caught offgaurd and so I could participate well. I know I will be really studying up and trying to understand concepts in law partly because its not just that, well I need to do well to get a good job, but then I can just study good for the other class or next semester and make up for the slack in this class or this semester. The pressure of 'study now' is always there because there is always the real possiblity that today will be the day you will be grilled.

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2005, 05:49:07 PM »
What exactly is the Socratic method?  Asking questions? 

Why do I hear so much fearful talk of the Socratic method in law school?

What happens if you just say, "I don't know?" 

I don't really expect experienced answers, but I am very interested in the perceived fears (whether they are true of not). 

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2005, 05:58:42 PM »
True Socratic Method means the prof only asks questions. When a student gives an answer, another question follows, etc. There are no answers.

The Socratic Method is one of the main reasons I'm going to law school. I can find the answers myself; I don't need a person for that. I just need someone to fire up my natural curiosity in the right direction. I think that's what learning and teaching is supposed to be, and that's what the Socratic Method is.

I don't see anything scary about it at all- unless the prospect of having to think is frightening to some people ???

The only thing that scares ME about LS is getting and staying organized, which has never been my strong point.

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2005, 06:10:33 PM »
My experience is limited to an undergraduate course in procedural law where the instructor used the Socratic method. It was definitely an effective tool for teaching critical thinking skills.

If you are only comfortable in structured lectures where all you do is copy down notes from power-point presentations, not so good for you. However if you are a person who sits in class and always feels like you know the next thing your professor is going to blurt out, you might be at home. Instead of the professor giving you all the answers, you are expected to find them yourself.

You aren't expected to have all the right answers, what is important rather is that you can construct a coherent and logically valid argument from precedent and statutory law. In fact what is "legally" correct is open to a matter interpretation.

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2005, 06:14:11 PM »
To get a very good idea on what the Socratic Method is, read the master himself.  Here is the dialogue from "Euthyphro", where Socrates is trying to get Euthyphro to explain the meaning of piety:


http://eawc.evansville.edu/anthology/euthyphro.htm


It should take you no more than ten minutes to read, but you'll come away with a good idea of what the method is.  Now, imagine this with law profs, some hard-assed, some not, discussing the intricacies of cases.  Fun, huh?

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2005, 09:41:15 PM »
Alrighty then!! Sounds like fun! :o >:(

underwhelm

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2005, 09:51:59 PM »
Socrates was an ass. He argued with sycophants, that's why things always turned out where he wanted. Or at least that's how Plato portrays it. The Method, as it pertains to Socrates himself, is a joke.

Which isn't to say it isn't a useful pedagogical device. But if it is, it's in spite of Socrates rather than because of him.

Just keep that in mind if the method ever gets under your skin.

lawbuddy

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2005, 02:49:21 AM »
Personally, I think the Socratic method is hot.  It's the kinda thing that'd really excite me about class.  I always hated lectures, and would more often than not have a hard time either refraining from blurting out answers or losing focus of what was going on.

Having a teacher as someone to really question your knowledge, and attack your idea set from angles you probably hadn't considered makes me almost tingle.  I love the idea of a good challenge, and I can't imagine what techniques you can learn regarding critical thinking simply from the questions which your professors ask of you.

I'm gonna be so stoked to get into law school.

Re: Besides what we will do once we get in, how about the Socratic method?
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2005, 05:23:23 AM »
Socrates was an ass. He argued with sycophants, that's why things always turned out where he wanted. Or at least that's how Plato portrays it. The Method, as it pertains to Socrates himself, is a joke.

Which isn't to say it isn't a useful pedagogical device. But if it is, it's in spite of Socrates rather than because of him.

Just keep that in mind if the method ever gets under your skin.

yeah those foolish ancients.  What fools they were in shaping the edifice for the entire bbdy of western thought to follow.  Idiots, formulating epistemological and ontological theories still accepted today.  Man I tell you, everbody else that was alive during their time was shoveling sheep *&^% and cowering in fear before the moon, but these idiots were ... ok ok, you get the point.