Law School Discussion

one bad grade

wha?

one bad grade
« on: February 26, 2005, 03:55:32 PM »
I'm applying to law schools next fall and I wanted to get people's opinions on a dilemma of mine.  I have a 3.7 gpa, went to an ivy, and have a work and extracurricular history that I feel pretty good about.  The problem is that I got a C+ my senior year (my only C) in an undergrad class about the supreme court, which was taught by a law professor at that school.  (And I plan on applying to that law school as well.)  I have given thought to writing an explanation as to the cause of this in my application, but I don't know whether it might just seem like a lame excuse.  Essentially, second semester senior year, I spent much of my time (when not in class, writing my thesis, busy w/community service, etc) taking care of my suicidal bf, who was about to get kicked out of the school because of his instability.  While I still managed to get decent grades in all my other classes, I didn't have the time necessary to devote to doing well in this class, and my grade suffered.  I don't want to sound like some whiny kid w/no control over my private life or something, but I still believe that this was a true contributor to my grade in that class.   Should I just let it go, or do you think I could make a real argument out of this? 

lanen

Re: one bad grade
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2005, 05:17:59 PM »
Don't do it.  Your gpa speaks for itself.   By writing a letter, you may just draw more attention to the grade

twarga

Re: one bad grade
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2005, 05:23:17 PM »
I agree.  Kick butt on your LSAT and no one will even notice your little C.

wha?

Re: one bad grade
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2005, 03:46:23 PM »
And what if I don't kick butt on the LSAT?  I mean, I had planned on just getting over it, but I don't believe that the grade will be easily overlooked, especially given the subject matter.

vegannramember

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Re: one bad grade
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2005, 03:52:00 PM »
this board makes me want to drive a nail through my temple.

NeverForever

Re: one bad grade
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2005, 03:58:33 PM »
I wouldn't worry about it. One C? Even if it is a "law" course, you're fine.

Re: one bad grade
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2005, 04:41:49 PM »
this board makes me want to drive a nail through my temple.

completely

Kait

Re: one bad grade
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2005, 05:42:46 PM »
I really think you are needlessly worrying about that one C+. I can understand being concerned because it was a law-related course and was taught by a professor at the law school, however you have to keep things in perspective. The adcomms are going to see that you have taken nearly 40 other courses throughout your undergrad years and earned good grades in all of those. One less-than-remarkable grade (even in a course with law-related material) is not going to change the overall impression your cumulative GPA will give. I'd personally advise against an addendum addressing it because it would simply draw undue attention to this one uncharacteristic grade.

If it helps any, think about this - those adcomms probably want your 3.7 in their stats so that they can bump up their numbers, pretty much regardless of the actual composition of the GPA (barring a collection of D's and F's).

Good luck - I'm sure you'll be fine!

Ninja

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Re: one bad grade
« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2005, 06:29:54 PM »
I wouldn't state directly that your other activities caused you to receive a lower grade.  Possibly you could use your statement to explain all your activities rather than directly say that your activities caused you to receive a low grade.

jg983

Re: one bad grade
« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2005, 06:48:07 PM »
I went through the same (exact) thing two semesters ago. It didn't reflect in my grades, but in my dropping out of everything else (clubs, work, etc.). I tried to explain it in my PS, but every time I read it, I thought, "Wow. Grow up. It was one semester." So I scrapped that statement and wrote a new one, with no mention of my personal problems. I think that if you're an otherwise strong candidate, spending too much time harping on a glitch on your record looks obsessive and pathetic. It's like someone with a 178 LSAT writing a PS trying to explain why he/she didn't get a 180.