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Author Topic: Catholic and American visits  (Read 5666 times)

GoHuskies05

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #30 on: February 24, 2005, 07:01:58 PM »
I had one when I visited one of my friend's there last spring.  It was pretty gross, then again we Chicagoans aren't used to being able to fold pizza and can be pizza snobs.

The pizza is awful, but it's still fun to eat it when it's three in the morning and you've had a few too many, so it serves its purpose.  If you come to the DC from Chicago, I suggest you learn how to cook.  There are very few good restaurants in the District, although having said that, I am starting to find some good eating down in Northern Virginia (I just found this awesome deli called the Italian Store, which I suggest people look up as they have great sandwiches).  Maryland and DC proper- forget about it, unless you go to Baltimore or Annapolis.  Baltimore has great food for cheap, very much like Chicago, but without the good pizza.  I could talk about food all day, so I won't start.  Oh, I just ate at the Prime Rib, which is a good steakhouse in the DC.  The DC has decent steakhouses, but nothing else.   

GoHuskies05

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #31 on: February 24, 2005, 07:08:12 PM »
I had one when I visited one of my friend's there last spring.  It was pretty gross, then again we Chicagoans aren't used to being able to fold pizza and can be pizza snobs.

What is your favorite pizza joint in Chicagoland?  Mine is Lou Malnati's for deep dish.  There's a place on Sheffield (I believe) just north of Lincoln Park called Pat's, which serves Sicilian style thin crust.  It is awesome.  Some of the best meatball pizza in the world.  The slices are small, but I had an eating contest there and ate 14 slices of pizza.  I'm not that big, but I can eat a lot. 

My friend keeps telling me about some great place for meatball pizza in Hoboken, New Jersey, but I haven't been there yet. 

If you come to the DC and you want good pizza, you will have to take the Amtrak north for three and a half hours, exit at Penn Station (New York), and then take a cab across the Brooklyn Bridge to Grimaldi's.  I guess if you're desperate you don't have to take the cab ride and you can get some good pizza in Greenwich Village at John's.


SuperMoni

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #32 on: February 24, 2005, 09:17:29 PM »
Quote
...If you come to the DC from Chicago, I suggest you learn how to cook.  There are very few good restaurants in the District...
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What are you talking about!  There are SO many great restaurants in DC!  You just have to be willing to spend the $$ to eat it.

GoHuskies05

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #33 on: February 24, 2005, 09:31:20 PM »
Quote
...If you come to the DC from Chicago, I suggest you learn how to cook.  There are very few good restaurants in the District...
Quote

What are you talking about!  There are SO many great restaurants in DC!  You just have to be willing to spend the $$ to eat it.

Sure, you can spend money and eat OK, but we're talking about a lot of money.  I usually eat out about 5 times a week, and I am not going to drop $50 each of these times on dinner.  Especially when the dinner is only worth $20 in any normal priced city. 

Maybe you know of some places I don't, and in that case, I'm all ears. 

For example, if you're in Chicago you can get great Italian, Greek, Thai, Chinese, American, Mexican (huge burritos as well) cuisine all in the price range of $7-15.  You cannot do this in the DC in my opinion. 

Here's a perfect example.  In Baltimore there is a famous restaurant called the Helmand (owned by President Karzai's half brother).  This is at least as good as any restaurant in the DC.  Entrees go for $9-20, so you can get out of there for under $30.  The portions are large and the food is unbelievable.  The only places in the District that compare are like Kincaid's, The Prime Rib, and Galileo, and no I'm not counting the Inn at Little Washington, which is a huge exception and not anywhere near DC.  I'm also not counting French places that serve itsy bitsy portions. 

In DC if you want decent cheap food, you either go to Virginia or Five Guys (which originated in VA) or Big Ben's Chili Bowl (which is really not that good). 

So anyway, I'm open for suggestions

elemnopee

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #34 on: February 24, 2005, 09:31:32 PM »

What are you talking about!  There are SO many great restaurants in DC!  You just have to be willing to spend the $$ to eat it.

There are a few gems, but overall the food is not comparable to other major cities.  The produce and meat is not fresh.  I think this is an East Coast thing, 9 out of 10 waiters suck.

Five Guys is nothing compared to In and Out.

BTW, there is a great Korean BBQ resturaunt by Pentagon City, amazing food, good service.

I think its a "I hate DC week" for me. it was so nice and sunny last week and then snowed today, what the hell?  DC is really a great city and perfect for anyone between 21 and 28.

GoHuskies05

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #35 on: February 24, 2005, 09:37:27 PM »

What are you talking about!  There are SO many great restaurants in DC!  You just have to be willing to spend the $$ to eat it.

There are a few gems, but overall the food is not comparable to other major cities.  The produce and meat is not fresh.  I think this is an East Coast thing, 9 out of 10 waiters suck.

BTW, there is a great Korean BBQ resturaunt by Pentagon City, amazing food, good service.

I think its a "I hate DC week" for me. it was so nice and sunny last week and then snowed today, what the hell?  DC is really a great city and perfect for anyone between 21 and 28.
Quote

Can you please tell me the name of this Korean BBQ restaurant.  I would love to go.  DC rocks as a city.  I love it here.  Food is awesome in NYC, Baltimore, Philly, and even Boston's North End, so I don't think it's an East Coast thing.  The service is awful unless you pay out the wazzu.  I love the snow.....this is great. 

elemnopee

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #36 on: February 24, 2005, 09:41:04 PM »
Woolae Oak

I just looked on their website and they are moving to Tyson's Corner.

http://www.woolaeoak.com

If you have never had Korean BBQ its quite an experience.

GoHuskies05

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #37 on: February 24, 2005, 09:49:11 PM »
Woolae Oak

I just looked on their website and they are moving to Tyson's Corner.

http://www.woolaeoak.com

If you have never had Korean BBQ its quite an experience.

Thanks so much.  I will be there this weekend.  I can't wait.  I love Korean BBQ.  I love all Korean food.  It has jumped way up on my list, as recently I had one of my best dining experiences at a Korean restaurant - but that's a story for another time.  Thanks again. 

P.S. notice how this place is NOT in DC proper.  Just trying to make my point. 

Matokah

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #38 on: February 24, 2005, 10:30:22 PM »
Quick question for people who took a tour and sit in on a class at Catholic: Were the people in the admissions office fairly accomodating?  I'm planning to visit on 11 March (a Friday) but I have yet to contact the admissions office.  I'm a little shy on the phone, so I just thought I'd ask.  That, and I've never been to DC ;)
University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law 2010!!

(LSN)

SuperMoni

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Re: Catholic and American visits
« Reply #39 on: February 24, 2005, 10:31:05 PM »

Sure, you can spend money and eat OK, but we're talking about a lot of money. I usually eat out about 5 times a week, and I am not going to drop $50 each of these times on dinner. Especially when the dinner is only worth $20 in any normal priced city...For example, if you're in Chicago you can get great Italian, Greek, Thai, Chinese, American, Mexican (huge burritos as well) cuisine all in the price range of $7-15. You cannot do this in the DC in my opinion...

Do you seriously go out to a sit down dinner 5 nights a week??  That's ridiculous--you need to learn how to cook!  You're obviously not going to eat at a gourmet restaurant everytime...Here are a few places of various cuisines that I like for some everyday dining or more, all with an ample amount of entrees under $20: (note: I go to GW, so I'm most familiar with the places around me ie Georgetown, Dupont, etc.)

Luigi's (Italian)
Cafe Japone (Japanese)
Brickskeller (American?  Who cares, they have 1500 beers!)
Lauriol Plaza (amazing Mexican, fabulous Margaritas) or Guapos, also good Tex-Mex
Zed's (Ethiopian)
One Fish, Two Fish (Asian fusion)
Panda Cafe (Chinese)
Mobey Dicks (Turkish I believe, great Shish Kebab)

...Just some of the ones that I regular on a student budget