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Author Topic: Practicing in Europe  (Read 591 times)

Ket

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Re: Practicing in Europe
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2005, 12:07:44 PM »
Anner, United Kingdom is and for more than 30 years has been part of EU.

Altogether, to my mind, it would be more difficult to practice law in France than in England since France is a civil law country. However, you can practice international law and EU law is also getting in elements of common law.

vkschicago

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Re: Practicing in Europe
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2005, 12:23:45 PM »
ooo, me too! only for me its london.  so technically it isn't europe since they aren't in the EU.

but anyway, yeh, lets get our heads together to find out!

I am looking to practice in London as well.  Great city. BTW the UK is in the EU. They joined after France no longer had De Gualle(sp?) to veto their application.  Sometime in the 70's.  The arent on the Euro though.  Switzerland is in Europe, but not in the EU, but they are still European :).

Anyways,  I am definitly interested in anything you guys find out :).


hope41

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Re: Practicing in Europe
« Reply #12 on: February 21, 2005, 04:24:01 PM »
I'd love to practice in Europe as well.  Would you have to bother with exams if you just join a firm in the US that has a European office?

Jumboshrimps

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Re: Practicing in Europe
« Reply #13 on: February 21, 2005, 04:32:23 PM »
The UK's legal system is similar to the American one. That is, they have a "common law" system which evolves by means of the judiciary. France, on the other hand (and most other first world countries), has a "civil law" system, which is dictated almost entirely by statutes and the legislative process. You should all be aware that these are very different animals.