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Author Topic: NYLS  (Read 5226 times)

legalkitty

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Re: NYLS
« Reply #30 on: July 05, 2005, 02:30:49 PM »
I really love all of the camaraderie which takes place in the depths of T3-4.  I say the depths because everyone and their brother assume that if you don't go to the top schools, you are a worthless lawyer, and will never experience happiness, joy, monetary enjoyment, etc.  I disagree wholeheartedly.  I think that there are some fantastic lawyers who do very well for themselves.  Furthermore, if you look at some of the top law firms, there are always, sprinkled in of course, lawyers who attending "tier 4 toilets".  This whole thread has given me hope and joy...for I am in the same boat, and would like some of you advice and/or encouragement.  I have a GPA of 3.51, LSAT 150.  Some soft factors, if they even help, non-traditional student, 3 kids, US military, just returned from Iraq.  I was Summa Cum Laude for degree granting school.  Anyways, I am looking at schools such as Albany, Appalachian??, Northern Kentucky, Widener, Southern Illinois, Vermont, Syracuse, Capital, and a few others around the same Tier, such as Pace Gonzaga, Quinnipiac.  Any help, encouragement, advice would be appreciated.

I think Military experience helps tremendously, and a 150 really isn't that bad. Anything over a 149 is manageable. It looks like you have a good list going. Just apply early, and best of luck!!
Attending: Widener PA!!
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ktcarlin

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Re: NYLS
« Reply #31 on: July 05, 2005, 03:11:23 PM »
I really appreciate all of your encouraging words.  I have had a constant battle, intellectually, whether the LSAT is an appropriate benchmark of law success. 

In short it goes like this:

Pro: It is a very in-depth, concise test whether someone has specific abilities of logical reasoning and thinking.

Con: There are A LOT, if not possibly hundreds, of other variables which are required for successful law studies.

Pro argument: One argument is that what if you're a bad test taker?
Pro counter-argument: Many class grades are based upon "one" test.
Pro counter-rebuttal: I doubt, seriously, that there is such an abstract, time laden rules which bound law school tests.
ANYWAYS, this is a basic argument that goes on in my mind, and could go on for hours and paragraphs longer here.

Oh well, thank you all anyways.  And I hope and pray that all of you will successfully fulfill your dreams, and that the administrators for law schools will see beyond the mark of mere LSAT scores and view other, possible more essential and vital, tangibles.  I would even include GPA into that category.

legalkitty

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Re: NYLS
« Reply #32 on: July 06, 2005, 09:47:21 AM »
I really appreciate all of your encouraging words.  I have had a constant battle, intellectually, whether the LSAT is an appropriate benchmark of law success. 

In short it goes like this:

Pro: It is a very in-depth, concise test whether someone has specific abilities of logical reasoning and thinking.

Con: There are A LOT, if not possibly hundreds, of other variables which are required for successful law studies.

Pro argument: One argument is that what if you're a bad test taker?
Pro counter-argument: Many class grades are based upon "one" test.
Pro counter-rebuttal: I doubt, seriously, that there is such an abstract, time laden rules which bound law school tests.
ANYWAYS, this is a basic argument that goes on in my mind, and could go on for hours and paragraphs longer here.

Oh well, thank you all anyways.  And I hope and pray that all of you will successfully fulfill your dreams, and that the administrators for law schools will see beyond the mark of mere LSAT scores and view other, possible more essential and vital, tangibles.  I would even include GPA into that category.


My biggest problem with the LSAT (other than the fact that it is HIGHLY overrated, and BTW, there is a definite difference between a standardized test and a final for a class) is that LS is mostly essay questions, and the only essay that is on the LSAT is ungraded! My K prof said that a lot of people who do well in class end up failing out of the program because they can't communicate their ideas on paper. It really befuttles me as to why this skill is not addressed AT ALL  on the almighty LSAT.

Well, just remember, that once you get into LS no one will give two craps about how you did on the LSAT, and you'll be able to get on with your life. I am sure you'll do great!

Attending: Widener PA!!
http://www.aldf.org